חיפוש
הדפסה
שיתוף
הפריט שבחרת:
מקום
רוצה לעזור לנו לשפר את התוכן? אפשר לשלוח הצעות

קהילת יהודי ויימאר

Weimar

A city in Thuringia, Germany.

A few Jews lived in Weimar as early as the Middle Ages. They were affected by the plague pogroms as well as by the expulsion from the Wettin areas. It was not until the 18th century that a small private community could be constituted. In April 1770 Duchess Anna Amalia von Weimar appointed Jacob Elkan to a court Jew in the Principality of Weimar. In the following years two more families moved to Weimar, so that in 1789 three Jewish families lived in the town.

These joined together to form a "private community". In 1805 Jacob Elkan set up a prayer room and a mikveh in his house, this building still exists today and is located at 25 Windischenstrasse. The initials of the community founder's name can still be read on the capstone of the entrance portal. After Elkan's death the building was used exclusively for residential purposes. Presumably from 1805 religious services were held in other private rooms of the Löser or Ulmann families. Jacob Elkan was also the founder of a Jewish cemetery in Weimar, which was used from 1774 to 1898. In the 20th century the site fell into disrepair and was then used as an orchard after the property passed into non-Jewish ownership. In 1983 part of the Jewish cemetery was restored and is now a memorial.

A religious community in the sense of a corporation under public law, could never be founded in Weimar. In 1903 some of the Jewish residents of Weimar joined together in the "Israelite Religious Association" which in 1925 had 25 members. In addition 80 other Jews lived in Weimar who did not join the association. In 1933 there were 91 Jewish inhabitants and in 1939 there were still eleven Jewish families  living here. In the years between 1942 and 1945, the Jewish residents who remained in Weimar were deported to the Nazi concentration and death camps in Eastern Europe. With the last deportations Jewish life in Weimar was irretrievably destroyed.

------------------------------------

This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.

סוג מקום:
עיר
מספר פריט:
258126
חובר ע"י חוקרים של אנו מוזיאון העם היהודי
מקומות קרובים:
פריטים קשורים:
Moholy-Nagy, László (Ladislaus) (born as Laszlo Weisz), (1895-1946), painter, designer and photographer born in Borsod, Hungary (Thden part of Austria-Hungary). In 1914 he was inducted into the Austro-Hungarian army. In 1917 he was severely wounded on the Russian front. During his convalescence he began drawing portraits and landscapes. Upon his discharge from the army he returned to Budapest, where he obtained the degree of Doctor of Law.

In Berlin he contributed paintings to the Sturm exhibits (1922-25). He taught at the Bauhaus Art University at Weimar, later at Dessau (1923-28), Germany. Under the pressure of political developments in Germany he left the Bauhaus and traveled throughout Europe (Hungary, Switzerland, Finland, Norway, France, Greece, Italy, Amsterdam). Subsequently he went to London, England, where he did publicity work for Imperial Airways and the London Transport Board. From 1937 on he lived in the United States.

From 1937 to 1938 he was principal of the New Bauhaus, Chicago, a school for the education of designers and architects, coordinating art, science and technology, sponsored by the Association of Arts and Industries. When the school closed after one academic year, Moholy-Nagy continued the work, upon enlistment of new faculty members, under the name of School of Design in Chicago which, through its teaching methods, becamne influential in art education in the United States.

In his own work Moholy-Nagy sought to use light as a medium of expression especially in photography and film and to analyze light in his paintings (exhibited in Paris and London, 1937), causing the functions of art and applied art to overlap. His film effects were used in H. G, Well's motion picture "The Shape of Things to Come". In Germany he had designed stage settings. Both in two- and in three-dimensional art he demanded that the creative artist know and use the possibilities afforded by science and technology. Experiments and theories were graphically embodied in such books as "Malerei-Photography-Film" (1925); "Vom Material zur Architektur" (1929); "The New Vision" (New York, 1931 and 1938).

Moholy-Nagy died in Chicago.
Joachim, Joseph (1831-1907), composer and violinist,born in Kopcseny (now Kittsee), Hungary (then part of the Austrian Empire, now in Austria). His family moved to Budapest, where Joseph began to study the violin at the age of five. He became a pupil of Hellmesberger and Boehm in Vienna, and then of David and Hauptmann in Leipzig, Germany. In 1843 Joachim made his first public appearance in Leipzig. One year later, he went to London, England, where his performance of the Beethoven Concerto with the London Philharmonic established his English reputation. In 1849 he went to Paris, France, where he performed with Hector Berlioz. From 1849 to 1854 he was concertmaster of Franz Liszt's orchestra at Weimar, Germany, and from 1854 to 1864, concertmaster and conductor of the Royal Hanover Orchestra.

Although Joachim had converted to Protestantism in 1855, he resigned from the Hanover Orchestra in 1864 when they refused to engage the violinist J. M. Gruen because he was a Jew.

Many works were dedicated to Joachim, including the Schumann, Brahms, Dvorak and Bruch violin concertos, Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody no. 12 and Schumann's Fourth Symphony (second version, 1853). In 1868, Joachim became director of the Hochschule fuer Musik in Berlin which, under his guidance, developed into one of the leading music institutions of the world. One year later he founded the celebrated Joachim String Quartet which, during its long and active existence, held a honoured position amongst the chamber music ensembles of the world. It was the Joachim String Quartet which was largely responsible for the popularity of the then much neglected last quartets of Beethoven. Joachim's playing the violin had remarkable dignity, repose, and artistic finish, earning him the title of "king of violinists." His interpretations of the concertos of Mozart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn and Brahms, and the solo sonatas of Bach were unequalled in his time for profundity of conception and for his command over their technical and esthetic problems.

His own compositions include the "Magyar concert"; "Hamlet nyitany" ("Hamlet Overture", op. 4), "Nocturne" (for violin and small orchestra op. 12) and "Dem Andenken Kleists" (op.14). Joachim's three concertos for violin were obviously modeled after Brahms, while other works for orchestra were derived from works or Schumann and Mendelssohn. Probably his most important works are the cadenzas for the concertos of Beethoven and Brahms which are still performed by leading violinists. He composed also a set of "Hebrew Melodies" for viola and piano. As a teacher, Joachim had a far-reaching influence on many of the leading violinist of his generation. His pupils included Hubay, Gregorovitch and Nachez.

Joachim was on friendly terms with Hans von Buelow, Anton Rubinstein, Remenyi, Clara and Robert Schumann, Mendelssohn, and Brahms. His advice and criticism proved invaluable to Brahms during the writing of his violin concerto. In 1877 he received an honorary degree from the University of Cambridge. He was also recipient of honorary degrees from German universities. In 1899, the fiftieth anniversary of his concert career was celebrated throughout the world of music.

Joachim died in Berlin.
Heymann-Marks, Margarete (Grete) (1899-1990), ceramic artist and Bauhaus student born in Koln, Germany. She attended school in Koln and later in Duesseldorf. In 1920 she attended Bauhaus classes in Weimar and in 1921 became a member of the Bauhaus workshop in Dornenburg, Saxony. In 1923, together with her husband Gustav Loebenstein, she established a Workshop for Artistic Ceramics in a Hael, a small town north of Berlin. The company became known for its quality products some of which were exported to the USA and England. By 1930 it employed some 120 people. Heymann continued to run the company by herself after her husband was killed in an accident. In 1933 the business was temporarily shut down after one of her employees denounced her to the Nazis as a "state enemy". It later reopened, but in 1935 she was forced to sell it for a nominal sum. With the help of one of her British clients, she fled to England in 1936 and settled in Stoke on Trent, the home of many pottery factories. She proceeded to establish a new plant in Stoke and resumed production of many of her old designs together with new ones. Her products were known as Grete Pottery. Lack of demand forced the company to close at the beginning of World War II.

Her work was considered very beautiful and advanced for its time. Composed of simple shapes, mostly circles and triangles, her ceramics had a very modern look. A strong individualist, who did not accept the gender discrimination of Weimar Germany, Grete Heymann always stuck to her own artistic ideas. After World War II she remarried educator Harold Marks and with him she moved to London where she reinvented herself as a painter.

לילה תתרואשווילי (1941 -2007) דוקטור לפילולוגיה, נולדה בעיר כוטאיסי, גאורגיה, משפחה דתית. אמה, דורה, הייתה כלכלנית ואביה, מיכאיל, היה מתמטיקאי ושימש כיו"ר ועדת הביקורת של בית הכנסת. תתרואשווילי סיימה בהצטיינות את לימודיה בבית הספר # 19 בשנת 1958. המשיכה את לימודיה בחוג לשפה גרמנית בבית הספר לשפות זרות של המכון הפדגוגי ובשנת 1969 סיימה את לימודי התואר השני בפילולוגיה גרמנית באוניברסיטה של ​​טביליסי.

משנת 1973 עבדה במכון לספרות גאורגית ע"ש שותא רוסתוולי באקדמיה למדעים של גאורגיה והתמחה בחקר הספרות גיאורגית ויחסיה עם ספרות בשפות אחרות. בשנת 1980 חיברה את המחקר "בעיית הפנתיאיזם בכתבים הפילוסופיים של גתה הצעיר" ובשנת 1997 סיימה את עבודת הדוקטורט על "וז'ה פשבלה וגתה - יחסים אידיאולוגיים והשקפת עולם".

תתרואשווילי שימשה כחברת נשיאות האגף הגאורגי של אגודת גתה הבינלאומית וכמזכירת האגודה בין השנים 1975 - 1991. השתתפה בכנסים הבינלאומיים בוויימאר, גרמניה, ומשנת 1981 הייתה חברה במרכז הבינלאומי לחקר גתה במוסקבה ובויימאר. תתרואשוילי פרסמה מאמרים מדעיים רבים אשר עסקו בספרות גרמנית קלאסית ובספרות השוואתית בגאורגיה ובחו"ל. בשנת 1982 פרסמה מונוגרפיה על עבודותיהם של גתה ווג'ה פשבלה. מחקריה נאספו בספר "מחקר ספרותי ומדעי. מכתבי, מסה" אשר יצא לאור בשנת 2013 לאחר מותה.

--------------------------------------------

ביוגרפיה זאת חוברה ע"י פרופ' דודו צ'יקבשוילי ונרשמה במאגרי המידע של בית התפוצות באדיבותה של המחברת.

כנר. נולד ביאסי, רומניה. למד בקונסרבטוריון של וינה והופיע לראשונה בגוואנדהאוס בלייפציג ב-1879. ב-1881 מונה לכנר ראשון באופרה של וינה ובתזמורת הפילהרמונית של וינה. תפקיד זה מילא עד 1938, כשנאלץ לעזוב את אוסטריה לאנגליה. לימד גם באקדמיה הלאומית של וינה עד 1924. ב-1882 הקים את רביעיית כלי-הקשת רוזה. אחיו, אדוארד רוזה, שנספה לימים בשואה, היה הצ'לן שלה. רביעיית כלי-הקשת שלו נחלה הצלחה רבה ורכשה מוניטין הן באירופה והן בארה"ב. ארנולד רוזה היה נשוי לאחותו של גוסטב מאהלר, יוסטינה. נפטר בלונדון, אנגליה.

ארפורט (Erfurt)


עיר בתורינגיה, גרמניה. עד מלחמת העולם השנייה השתייכה ארפורט למחוז סקסוניה.

המאה ה-21

ב-1998 בית הכנסת העתיק שוחזר ומתקיימים לימודי יהדות בו. ב-2003 נמנו בקהילה 550 אנשים, רובם מהגרים מברית המועצות לשעבר. ראש הקהילה הוא ריינהרד שארם ורב הקהילה הוא קונסנטין פאל. קיים מרכז תרבות של הקהילה ובו מתקיימים שיעורי יהדות וחברה כגון: קונצרטים, תכניות רדיו ומפגשים על כוס קפה. בית העלמין היהודי הישן נסגר ונפתח בית עלמין חדש. הוקם בו חדר טהרה והספדים נאמרים בסגנון מיוחד . בעיר מתקיימים סיורים במוזיאון, בבית הכנסת העתיק ובמקווה העתיק.

היסטוריה

היהודים מוזכרים לראשונה בארפורט במאה ה-12. בתחילה תחת חסותו של המלך, ובמחצית השנייה של המאה ה-12 הם עברו לסמכותו של הארכיבישוף ממיינץ, שחיבר עבורם נוסח שבועה בגרמנית. ב-1209 ויתר המלך גם על זכותו לגבות מסים מהיהודים, ובשנת 1212 הוענקה הזכות במפורש לארכיבישוף.  בפרעות שהתחוללו ב-1221 נשרף בית הכנסת. יהודים נרצחו או השליכו את עצמם לתוך הלהבות; ביניהם היה הפייטן והחזן שמואל בן קלונימוס. אף על פי כן, הקהילה היהודית של ארפורט המשיכה להתקיים ואף התרחבה. לאחר זמן מה הוקם בית כנסת חדש, ורבנים מפורסמים בחרו בארפורט כמקום מושבם. לפי המשוער, בין 1286 ל-1293, ר' אשר בן יחיאל (הרא"ש) וקלונימוס בן אליעזר הנקדן בעל "מסורה קטנה", גרו בארפורט. כתב היד של קלונימוס בן אליעזר שמור בארפורט עד היום. במהלך ימי הביניים ניהלו יהודי ארפוט את טקס התפילה בנוסח של סקסוניה. ספר הפולחן של הקהילה נשמר במכללת היהודים, לונדון (מס' 104, 4).

בתחילת המאה ה-14 ההגנה על היהודים עברה לידי העירייה. אך הגנה זו לא הועילה, ובתחילת במרס 1349 התרגשה עליהם שואת "המגיפה השחורה" שבה נרצחו יותר ממאה איש ורבים שלחו אש בבתיהם ומתו על קידוש השם, ביניהם ר' אלכסנדר זוסלין הכהן, בעל "ספר האגודה". היהודים הנותרים גורשו מן העיר. ישראל בן יואל זוסלין מזכיר את הקדושים המעונים של ארפורט בקינה (ספר הדמעות, 2, 126-7). ב-1357 מועצת העיר התירה ליהודים לשוב ולגור בעיר ולבנות בית כנסת חדש. ב-1391 ביטל המלך את כל חובות הנוצרים ליהודי ארפורט והעבירם לידי העירייה תמורת 2,000 גולדן. העירייה תבעה את הסכום הזה מן היהודים, אך הבטיחה להחזיר להם חלק מהחובות. לאחר מכן נאלצו היהודים לשלם מס מיוחד לאוצר המלך.

בשנת 1418 הם נאלצו להצהיר בשבועה, על גודל רכושם, בבית הכנסת, והמלך גבה מהם מסים חדשים על בסיס זה. בשנת 1458 היהודים גורשו שוב מן העיר.

במאה ה-15 נמנתה ארפורט עם הקהילות הגדולות והחשובות ביותר בגרמניה, בהנהגת גדולי תורה: ר' מאיר בן ברוך הלוי; תלמידו היה ר' הלל מארפורט. באמצע המאה ר' יעקב בן יהודה וייל לימד בארפורט. בתקופה זו מילאו יהודי ארפורט תפקיד חשוב בבנקאות בתורינגיה.

בסביבות 1820 השתמשו השלטונות הפרוסיים במצבות של בית העלמין היהודי למען ביצור העיר.

היישוב היהודי התחדש בארפורט בעשור השני של המאה ה-19, כאשר הוקם בית כנסת חדש, וגדל מ-144 נפש ב-1844 לכדי 546 בערך ב-1880 (1.03% מכלל האוכלוסייה); 795 ב-1910 (0.72%); ו-831 ב-1933 (%0.6 מכלל האוכלוסייה).

לאחר עליית הנאצים, עזבו רוב היהודים את ארפורט, ב-1939 נמנו רק 263 יהודים בעיר. ב-9 בנובמבר 1938 הועלה בית הכנסת באש והקהילה נאלצה לשלם את מחיר הדלק ששימש להצתה ובעד פינוי ההריסות. הגברים הוחזקו בתנאי השפלה בבית ספר מקומי וגורשו לבוכנוואלד. 173 היהודים האחרונים בעיר הועברו לטרזיינשטאדט בפברואר 1945.

הקהילה היהודית אחרי השואה

הקהילה חודשה אחרי השואה. בשנת 1952 נבנו בית כנסת חדש ומקווה. בשנת 1961 התגוררו בעיר 120 יהודים. הוצא ספר זיכרון לקורבנות השואה. בשנת 1998 שוחזר בית הכנסת העתיק ומתקיימים בו שיעורי יהדות. בארכיון המרכזי לתולדות העם היהודי בירושלים שמורים פנקסי קהילת ארפורט לשנים 1936-1855. אחד מכתבי היד המפורסמים של התוספתא נמצא בארפורט, ונקרא על שמה. על פי סול ליברמן, בהקדמה למהדורת התוספתא בי-פשוטו, התוספתא נכתבה כנראה במאה ה-12 בגרמניה.

 

גוטה GOTHA

עיר בטורינגיה, גרמניה. עד 1990 בגרמניה המזרחית.

יהודים מבני המקום נזכרים בתעודות מקלן, מאמצע המאה ה-13. שמונה יהודים מגותא הוצאו להורג בשל עלילת-הדם בווייסנזה (1303). טבח נערך בקהילה בשנים 1349 ו-1391, והיא חדלה להתקיים, כפי הנראה, ברדיפות 1460-1459. עד 1848 לא הורשו יהודים להתגורר בדוכסות גותא. כעבור שלושים שנה מנתה הקהילה כ- 250 איש; בית-כנסת נחנך ב- 1903. בתחילת שנות ה-30 פעלו בקהילה המשגשגת (בת 350 נפש) בית-ספר, ספריה ושש אגודות צדקה. אור ליום 10 בנובמבר 1938 ("ליל-הבדולח") הוצת בית-הכנסת ו-28 מאנשי המקום נלקחו לבוכנוואלד. 80 היהודים האחרונים גורשו ב- 1939.

Naumburg

A town in the district of Kassel in Hesse, Germany.

First Jewish presence: Middle Ages; peak Jewish population: 81 in 1855; Jewish population in 1933: approximately 35

Jews were massacred in Naumburg in 1494, two years after which their synagogue was destroyed. Further Jewish settlement was forbidden in 1499, but records of a court case from 1503 mention a Jew. By 1692, six Jewish families had moved to Naumburg. Between 1793 and 1795, the community built a new synagogue on Gerichtstrasse (present-day 9 Graf-Volkwin- Strasse); in 1844, the building was enlarged to accommodate a school (it housed an apartment for the teacher) and a mikveh, both of which were moved to the synagogue from other locations. Naumburg’s synagogue had a seating capacity of 67 (40 men, 27 women), additional seating for guests and an impressive array of brass lighting fixtures. In 1826, the Jews of Naumburg consecrated a new cemetery (it was also used by Jews from Elben, Altenstaedt and Martinhagen). Then part of the district of Wolfhagen, the community belonged to the provincial rabbinate in Kassel. In 1931/32, three children received religious instruction. A chevra kadisha was active in the community, with which (by 1933) the Jews of Altendorf, Altenstaedt, Elben, Heimarshausen and Riede had been affiliated.

On October 3, 1938, the local police ordered Jews to leave town within four weeks. On November 11, 1938 (after Pogrom Night), SA men destroyed the synagogue’s interior, heavily damaged the mikveh and school, plundered and burned down the empty Rosenstein and Blumenkorn apartments and partially destroyed the Rosenstein family residence. Naumburg’s fire department extinguished fires that were lit in the Rosenstein and Blumenkorn homes. According to eyewitnesses, Jews were detained near the stone quarry, guarded by SA men, while this was going on. The last community leader immigrated to Chile; his predecessor made it to Argentina. In all, five families emigrated—three went to South America and two to Israel. By November 1939, all Jews had left Naumburg, many of whom were deported from Kassel to Riga on December 9, 1941. At least 28 local Jews perished in the Shoah. A memorial plaque was unveiled at the former synagogue site on November 14, 2004.

----------------------------------------

This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.

Jena

A city in Thuringia, Germany.

Around 1400 there was a small Jewish community in Jena. In 1431 a synagogue that was located on Jüdengasse and Leutragasse is mentioned. From the middle of the 16th century to 1850 Jews were forbidden to settle in Jena. It was not until the second half of the 19th century that a small Jewish community formed again, but it never received the status of a religious community. The newly founded "Israelite Religious Community" endeavored to provide regular religious instruction for school-age children and worship service. Both took place in the private rooms of community members. The buildings in Scheidlerstrasse 3 and in the former Schützenstrasse 52 are now privately owned and used as residential buildings. The number of members of the Jena community developed as follows: In 1880 there were 30 Jewish residents in Jena, in 1890 there were 64, in 1895 already 85, in 1900 the number fell to 61 and in 1905 there were 145 Jews in Jena. The deceased of the community were buried in the Jewish cemetery of the Erfurt community. Although the Jena congregation was given the opportunity to set up a burial place in a separate section of the Catholic cemetery, the predominantly conservative congregation refused.

In 1925 there were 277 Jewish residents in Jena. In 1933 it was less than half with 111. By the end of 1938 all Jewish businesses were "Aryanized" or closed, the Jews living in Jena at that time were crammed into so-called "Jewish houses". From 1942 the deportations to the to the Nazi concentration camps began. After the end of the war eleven survivors of Jena Jews returned from Theresienstadt, and they again founded a small community which only existed for a very short time.

It was only after 1990 when the USSR collapsed, that Jewish emigrants came to Jena and formed a new community.

----------------------------------------

This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz. 

במאגרי המידע הפתוחים
גניאולוגיה יהודית
שמות משפחה
קהילות יהודיות
תיעוד חזותי
מרכז המוזיקה היהודית
מקום
אA
אA
אA
רוצה לעזור לנו לשפר את התוכן? אפשר לשלוח הצעות
קהילת יהודי ויימאר

Weimar

A city in Thuringia, Germany.

A few Jews lived in Weimar as early as the Middle Ages. They were affected by the plague pogroms as well as by the expulsion from the Wettin areas. It was not until the 18th century that a small private community could be constituted. In April 1770 Duchess Anna Amalia von Weimar appointed Jacob Elkan to a court Jew in the Principality of Weimar. In the following years two more families moved to Weimar, so that in 1789 three Jewish families lived in the town.

These joined together to form a "private community". In 1805 Jacob Elkan set up a prayer room and a mikveh in his house, this building still exists today and is located at 25 Windischenstrasse. The initials of the community founder's name can still be read on the capstone of the entrance portal. After Elkan's death the building was used exclusively for residential purposes. Presumably from 1805 religious services were held in other private rooms of the Löser or Ulmann families. Jacob Elkan was also the founder of a Jewish cemetery in Weimar, which was used from 1774 to 1898. In the 20th century the site fell into disrepair and was then used as an orchard after the property passed into non-Jewish ownership. In 1983 part of the Jewish cemetery was restored and is now a memorial.

A religious community in the sense of a corporation under public law, could never be founded in Weimar. In 1903 some of the Jewish residents of Weimar joined together in the "Israelite Religious Association" which in 1925 had 25 members. In addition 80 other Jews lived in Weimar who did not join the association. In 1933 there were 91 Jewish inhabitants and in 1939 there were still eleven Jewish families  living here. In the years between 1942 and 1945, the Jewish residents who remained in Weimar were deported to the Nazi concentration and death camps in Eastern Europe. With the last deportations Jewish life in Weimar was irretrievably destroyed.

------------------------------------

This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.

חובר ע"י חוקרים של אנו מוזיאון העם היהודי

ינה
נאומבורג
גוטה
ארפורט

Jena

A city in Thuringia, Germany.

Around 1400 there was a small Jewish community in Jena. In 1431 a synagogue that was located on Jüdengasse and Leutragasse is mentioned. From the middle of the 16th century to 1850 Jews were forbidden to settle in Jena. It was not until the second half of the 19th century that a small Jewish community formed again, but it never received the status of a religious community. The newly founded "Israelite Religious Community" endeavored to provide regular religious instruction for school-age children and worship service. Both took place in the private rooms of community members. The buildings in Scheidlerstrasse 3 and in the former Schützenstrasse 52 are now privately owned and used as residential buildings. The number of members of the Jena community developed as follows: In 1880 there were 30 Jewish residents in Jena, in 1890 there were 64, in 1895 already 85, in 1900 the number fell to 61 and in 1905 there were 145 Jews in Jena. The deceased of the community were buried in the Jewish cemetery of the Erfurt community. Although the Jena congregation was given the opportunity to set up a burial place in a separate section of the Catholic cemetery, the predominantly conservative congregation refused.

In 1925 there were 277 Jewish residents in Jena. In 1933 it was less than half with 111. By the end of 1938 all Jewish businesses were "Aryanized" or closed, the Jews living in Jena at that time were crammed into so-called "Jewish houses". From 1942 the deportations to the to the Nazi concentration camps began. After the end of the war eleven survivors of Jena Jews returned from Theresienstadt, and they again founded a small community which only existed for a very short time.

It was only after 1990 when the USSR collapsed, that Jewish emigrants came to Jena and formed a new community.

----------------------------------------

This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz. 

Naumburg

A town in the district of Kassel in Hesse, Germany.

First Jewish presence: Middle Ages; peak Jewish population: 81 in 1855; Jewish population in 1933: approximately 35

Jews were massacred in Naumburg in 1494, two years after which their synagogue was destroyed. Further Jewish settlement was forbidden in 1499, but records of a court case from 1503 mention a Jew. By 1692, six Jewish families had moved to Naumburg. Between 1793 and 1795, the community built a new synagogue on Gerichtstrasse (present-day 9 Graf-Volkwin- Strasse); in 1844, the building was enlarged to accommodate a school (it housed an apartment for the teacher) and a mikveh, both of which were moved to the synagogue from other locations. Naumburg’s synagogue had a seating capacity of 67 (40 men, 27 women), additional seating for guests and an impressive array of brass lighting fixtures. In 1826, the Jews of Naumburg consecrated a new cemetery (it was also used by Jews from Elben, Altenstaedt and Martinhagen). Then part of the district of Wolfhagen, the community belonged to the provincial rabbinate in Kassel. In 1931/32, three children received religious instruction. A chevra kadisha was active in the community, with which (by 1933) the Jews of Altendorf, Altenstaedt, Elben, Heimarshausen and Riede had been affiliated.

On October 3, 1938, the local police ordered Jews to leave town within four weeks. On November 11, 1938 (after Pogrom Night), SA men destroyed the synagogue’s interior, heavily damaged the mikveh and school, plundered and burned down the empty Rosenstein and Blumenkorn apartments and partially destroyed the Rosenstein family residence. Naumburg’s fire department extinguished fires that were lit in the Rosenstein and Blumenkorn homes. According to eyewitnesses, Jews were detained near the stone quarry, guarded by SA men, while this was going on. The last community leader immigrated to Chile; his predecessor made it to Argentina. In all, five families emigrated—three went to South America and two to Israel. By November 1939, all Jews had left Naumburg, many of whom were deported from Kassel to Riga on December 9, 1941. At least 28 local Jews perished in the Shoah. A memorial plaque was unveiled at the former synagogue site on November 14, 2004.

----------------------------------------

This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.

גוטה GOTHA

עיר בטורינגיה, גרמניה. עד 1990 בגרמניה המזרחית.

יהודים מבני המקום נזכרים בתעודות מקלן, מאמצע המאה ה-13. שמונה יהודים מגותא הוצאו להורג בשל עלילת-הדם בווייסנזה (1303). טבח נערך בקהילה בשנים 1349 ו-1391, והיא חדלה להתקיים, כפי הנראה, ברדיפות 1460-1459. עד 1848 לא הורשו יהודים להתגורר בדוכסות גותא. כעבור שלושים שנה מנתה הקהילה כ- 250 איש; בית-כנסת נחנך ב- 1903. בתחילת שנות ה-30 פעלו בקהילה המשגשגת (בת 350 נפש) בית-ספר, ספריה ושש אגודות צדקה. אור ליום 10 בנובמבר 1938 ("ליל-הבדולח") הוצת בית-הכנסת ו-28 מאנשי המקום נלקחו לבוכנוואלד. 80 היהודים האחרונים גורשו ב- 1939.

ארפורט (Erfurt)


עיר בתורינגיה, גרמניה. עד מלחמת העולם השנייה השתייכה ארפורט למחוז סקסוניה.

המאה ה-21

ב-1998 בית הכנסת העתיק שוחזר ומתקיימים לימודי יהדות בו. ב-2003 נמנו בקהילה 550 אנשים, רובם מהגרים מברית המועצות לשעבר. ראש הקהילה הוא ריינהרד שארם ורב הקהילה הוא קונסנטין פאל. קיים מרכז תרבות של הקהילה ובו מתקיימים שיעורי יהדות וחברה כגון: קונצרטים, תכניות רדיו ומפגשים על כוס קפה. בית העלמין היהודי הישן נסגר ונפתח בית עלמין חדש. הוקם בו חדר טהרה והספדים נאמרים בסגנון מיוחד . בעיר מתקיימים סיורים במוזיאון, בבית הכנסת העתיק ובמקווה העתיק.

היסטוריה

היהודים מוזכרים לראשונה בארפורט במאה ה-12. בתחילה תחת חסותו של המלך, ובמחצית השנייה של המאה ה-12 הם עברו לסמכותו של הארכיבישוף ממיינץ, שחיבר עבורם נוסח שבועה בגרמנית. ב-1209 ויתר המלך גם על זכותו לגבות מסים מהיהודים, ובשנת 1212 הוענקה הזכות במפורש לארכיבישוף.  בפרעות שהתחוללו ב-1221 נשרף בית הכנסת. יהודים נרצחו או השליכו את עצמם לתוך הלהבות; ביניהם היה הפייטן והחזן שמואל בן קלונימוס. אף על פי כן, הקהילה היהודית של ארפורט המשיכה להתקיים ואף התרחבה. לאחר זמן מה הוקם בית כנסת חדש, ורבנים מפורסמים בחרו בארפורט כמקום מושבם. לפי המשוער, בין 1286 ל-1293, ר' אשר בן יחיאל (הרא"ש) וקלונימוס בן אליעזר הנקדן בעל "מסורה קטנה", גרו בארפורט. כתב היד של קלונימוס בן אליעזר שמור בארפורט עד היום. במהלך ימי הביניים ניהלו יהודי ארפוט את טקס התפילה בנוסח של סקסוניה. ספר הפולחן של הקהילה נשמר במכללת היהודים, לונדון (מס' 104, 4).

בתחילת המאה ה-14 ההגנה על היהודים עברה לידי העירייה. אך הגנה זו לא הועילה, ובתחילת במרס 1349 התרגשה עליהם שואת "המגיפה השחורה" שבה נרצחו יותר ממאה איש ורבים שלחו אש בבתיהם ומתו על קידוש השם, ביניהם ר' אלכסנדר זוסלין הכהן, בעל "ספר האגודה". היהודים הנותרים גורשו מן העיר. ישראל בן יואל זוסלין מזכיר את הקדושים המעונים של ארפורט בקינה (ספר הדמעות, 2, 126-7). ב-1357 מועצת העיר התירה ליהודים לשוב ולגור בעיר ולבנות בית כנסת חדש. ב-1391 ביטל המלך את כל חובות הנוצרים ליהודי ארפורט והעבירם לידי העירייה תמורת 2,000 גולדן. העירייה תבעה את הסכום הזה מן היהודים, אך הבטיחה להחזיר להם חלק מהחובות. לאחר מכן נאלצו היהודים לשלם מס מיוחד לאוצר המלך.

בשנת 1418 הם נאלצו להצהיר בשבועה, על גודל רכושם, בבית הכנסת, והמלך גבה מהם מסים חדשים על בסיס זה. בשנת 1458 היהודים גורשו שוב מן העיר.

במאה ה-15 נמנתה ארפורט עם הקהילות הגדולות והחשובות ביותר בגרמניה, בהנהגת גדולי תורה: ר' מאיר בן ברוך הלוי; תלמידו היה ר' הלל מארפורט. באמצע המאה ר' יעקב בן יהודה וייל לימד בארפורט. בתקופה זו מילאו יהודי ארפורט תפקיד חשוב בבנקאות בתורינגיה.

בסביבות 1820 השתמשו השלטונות הפרוסיים במצבות של בית העלמין היהודי למען ביצור העיר.

היישוב היהודי התחדש בארפורט בעשור השני של המאה ה-19, כאשר הוקם בית כנסת חדש, וגדל מ-144 נפש ב-1844 לכדי 546 בערך ב-1880 (1.03% מכלל האוכלוסייה); 795 ב-1910 (0.72%); ו-831 ב-1933 (%0.6 מכלל האוכלוסייה).

לאחר עליית הנאצים, עזבו רוב היהודים את ארפורט, ב-1939 נמנו רק 263 יהודים בעיר. ב-9 בנובמבר 1938 הועלה בית הכנסת באש והקהילה נאלצה לשלם את מחיר הדלק ששימש להצתה ובעד פינוי ההריסות. הגברים הוחזקו בתנאי השפלה בבית ספר מקומי וגורשו לבוכנוואלד. 173 היהודים האחרונים בעיר הועברו לטרזיינשטאדט בפברואר 1945.

הקהילה היהודית אחרי השואה

הקהילה חודשה אחרי השואה. בשנת 1952 נבנו בית כנסת חדש ומקווה. בשנת 1961 התגוררו בעיר 120 יהודים. הוצא ספר זיכרון לקורבנות השואה. בשנת 1998 שוחזר בית הכנסת העתיק ומתקיימים בו שיעורי יהדות. בארכיון המרכזי לתולדות העם היהודי בירושלים שמורים פנקסי קהילת ארפורט לשנים 1936-1855. אחד מכתבי היד המפורסמים של התוספתא נמצא בארפורט, ונקרא על שמה. על פי סול ליברמן, בהקדמה למהדורת התוספתא בי-פשוטו, התוספתא נכתבה כנראה במאה ה-12 בגרמניה.

 

אדוארד רוזה
לילה תתרואשווילי
היימן-מרקס, מרגרטה
יואכים, יוסף
מוהולי-נאג'י, לסלו (לדיסלאו)
כנר. נולד ביאסי, רומניה. למד בקונסרבטוריון של וינה והופיע לראשונה בגוואנדהאוס בלייפציג ב-1879. ב-1881 מונה לכנר ראשון באופרה של וינה ובתזמורת הפילהרמונית של וינה. תפקיד זה מילא עד 1938, כשנאלץ לעזוב את אוסטריה לאנגליה. לימד גם באקדמיה הלאומית של וינה עד 1924. ב-1882 הקים את רביעיית כלי-הקשת רוזה. אחיו, אדוארד רוזה, שנספה לימים בשואה, היה הצ'לן שלה. רביעיית כלי-הקשת שלו נחלה הצלחה רבה ורכשה מוניטין הן באירופה והן בארה"ב. ארנולד רוזה היה נשוי לאחותו של גוסטב מאהלר, יוסטינה. נפטר בלונדון, אנגליה.

לילה תתרואשווילי (1941 -2007) דוקטור לפילולוגיה, נולדה בעיר כוטאיסי, גאורגיה, משפחה דתית. אמה, דורה, הייתה כלכלנית ואביה, מיכאיל, היה מתמטיקאי ושימש כיו"ר ועדת הביקורת של בית הכנסת. תתרואשווילי סיימה בהצטיינות את לימודיה בבית הספר # 19 בשנת 1958. המשיכה את לימודיה בחוג לשפה גרמנית בבית הספר לשפות זרות של המכון הפדגוגי ובשנת 1969 סיימה את לימודי התואר השני בפילולוגיה גרמנית באוניברסיטה של ​​טביליסי.

משנת 1973 עבדה במכון לספרות גאורגית ע"ש שותא רוסתוולי באקדמיה למדעים של גאורגיה והתמחה בחקר הספרות גיאורגית ויחסיה עם ספרות בשפות אחרות. בשנת 1980 חיברה את המחקר "בעיית הפנתיאיזם בכתבים הפילוסופיים של גתה הצעיר" ובשנת 1997 סיימה את עבודת הדוקטורט על "וז'ה פשבלה וגתה - יחסים אידיאולוגיים והשקפת עולם".

תתרואשווילי שימשה כחברת נשיאות האגף הגאורגי של אגודת גתה הבינלאומית וכמזכירת האגודה בין השנים 1975 - 1991. השתתפה בכנסים הבינלאומיים בוויימאר, גרמניה, ומשנת 1981 הייתה חברה במרכז הבינלאומי לחקר גתה במוסקבה ובויימאר. תתרואשוילי פרסמה מאמרים מדעיים רבים אשר עסקו בספרות גרמנית קלאסית ובספרות השוואתית בגאורגיה ובחו"ל. בשנת 1982 פרסמה מונוגרפיה על עבודותיהם של גתה ווג'ה פשבלה. מחקריה נאספו בספר "מחקר ספרותי ומדעי. מכתבי, מסה" אשר יצא לאור בשנת 2013 לאחר מותה.

--------------------------------------------

ביוגרפיה זאת חוברה ע"י פרופ' דודו צ'יקבשוילי ונרשמה במאגרי המידע של בית התפוצות באדיבותה של המחברת.

Heymann-Marks, Margarete (Grete) (1899-1990), ceramic artist and Bauhaus student born in Koln, Germany. She attended school in Koln and later in Duesseldorf. In 1920 she attended Bauhaus classes in Weimar and in 1921 became a member of the Bauhaus workshop in Dornenburg, Saxony. In 1923, together with her husband Gustav Loebenstein, she established a Workshop for Artistic Ceramics in a Hael, a small town north of Berlin. The company became known for its quality products some of which were exported to the USA and England. By 1930 it employed some 120 people. Heymann continued to run the company by herself after her husband was killed in an accident. In 1933 the business was temporarily shut down after one of her employees denounced her to the Nazis as a "state enemy". It later reopened, but in 1935 she was forced to sell it for a nominal sum. With the help of one of her British clients, she fled to England in 1936 and settled in Stoke on Trent, the home of many pottery factories. She proceeded to establish a new plant in Stoke and resumed production of many of her old designs together with new ones. Her products were known as Grete Pottery. Lack of demand forced the company to close at the beginning of World War II.

Her work was considered very beautiful and advanced for its time. Composed of simple shapes, mostly circles and triangles, her ceramics had a very modern look. A strong individualist, who did not accept the gender discrimination of Weimar Germany, Grete Heymann always stuck to her own artistic ideas. After World War II she remarried educator Harold Marks and with him she moved to London where she reinvented herself as a painter.
Joachim, Joseph (1831-1907), composer and violinist,born in Kopcseny (now Kittsee), Hungary (then part of the Austrian Empire, now in Austria). His family moved to Budapest, where Joseph began to study the violin at the age of five. He became a pupil of Hellmesberger and Boehm in Vienna, and then of David and Hauptmann in Leipzig, Germany. In 1843 Joachim made his first public appearance in Leipzig. One year later, he went to London, England, where his performance of the Beethoven Concerto with the London Philharmonic established his English reputation. In 1849 he went to Paris, France, where he performed with Hector Berlioz. From 1849 to 1854 he was concertmaster of Franz Liszt's orchestra at Weimar, Germany, and from 1854 to 1864, concertmaster and conductor of the Royal Hanover Orchestra.

Although Joachim had converted to Protestantism in 1855, he resigned from the Hanover Orchestra in 1864 when they refused to engage the violinist J. M. Gruen because he was a Jew.

Many works were dedicated to Joachim, including the Schumann, Brahms, Dvorak and Bruch violin concertos, Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody no. 12 and Schumann's Fourth Symphony (second version, 1853). In 1868, Joachim became director of the Hochschule fuer Musik in Berlin which, under his guidance, developed into one of the leading music institutions of the world. One year later he founded the celebrated Joachim String Quartet which, during its long and active existence, held a honoured position amongst the chamber music ensembles of the world. It was the Joachim String Quartet which was largely responsible for the popularity of the then much neglected last quartets of Beethoven. Joachim's playing the violin had remarkable dignity, repose, and artistic finish, earning him the title of "king of violinists." His interpretations of the concertos of Mozart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn and Brahms, and the solo sonatas of Bach were unequalled in his time for profundity of conception and for his command over their technical and esthetic problems.

His own compositions include the "Magyar concert"; "Hamlet nyitany" ("Hamlet Overture", op. 4), "Nocturne" (for violin and small orchestra op. 12) and "Dem Andenken Kleists" (op.14). Joachim's three concertos for violin were obviously modeled after Brahms, while other works for orchestra were derived from works or Schumann and Mendelssohn. Probably his most important works are the cadenzas for the concertos of Beethoven and Brahms which are still performed by leading violinists. He composed also a set of "Hebrew Melodies" for viola and piano. As a teacher, Joachim had a far-reaching influence on many of the leading violinist of his generation. His pupils included Hubay, Gregorovitch and Nachez.

Joachim was on friendly terms with Hans von Buelow, Anton Rubinstein, Remenyi, Clara and Robert Schumann, Mendelssohn, and Brahms. His advice and criticism proved invaluable to Brahms during the writing of his violin concerto. In 1877 he received an honorary degree from the University of Cambridge. He was also recipient of honorary degrees from German universities. In 1899, the fiftieth anniversary of his concert career was celebrated throughout the world of music.

Joachim died in Berlin.
Moholy-Nagy, László (Ladislaus) (born as Laszlo Weisz), (1895-1946), painter, designer and photographer born in Borsod, Hungary (Thden part of Austria-Hungary). In 1914 he was inducted into the Austro-Hungarian army. In 1917 he was severely wounded on the Russian front. During his convalescence he began drawing portraits and landscapes. Upon his discharge from the army he returned to Budapest, where he obtained the degree of Doctor of Law.

In Berlin he contributed paintings to the Sturm exhibits (1922-25). He taught at the Bauhaus Art University at Weimar, later at Dessau (1923-28), Germany. Under the pressure of political developments in Germany he left the Bauhaus and traveled throughout Europe (Hungary, Switzerland, Finland, Norway, France, Greece, Italy, Amsterdam). Subsequently he went to London, England, where he did publicity work for Imperial Airways and the London Transport Board. From 1937 on he lived in the United States.

From 1937 to 1938 he was principal of the New Bauhaus, Chicago, a school for the education of designers and architects, coordinating art, science and technology, sponsored by the Association of Arts and Industries. When the school closed after one academic year, Moholy-Nagy continued the work, upon enlistment of new faculty members, under the name of School of Design in Chicago which, through its teaching methods, becamne influential in art education in the United States.

In his own work Moholy-Nagy sought to use light as a medium of expression especially in photography and film and to analyze light in his paintings (exhibited in Paris and London, 1937), causing the functions of art and applied art to overlap. His film effects were used in H. G, Well's motion picture "The Shape of Things to Come". In Germany he had designed stage settings. Both in two- and in three-dimensional art he demanded that the creative artist know and use the possibilities afforded by science and technology. Experiments and theories were graphically embodied in such books as "Malerei-Photography-Film" (1925); "Vom Material zur Architektur" (1929); "The New Vision" (New York, 1931 and 1938).

Moholy-Nagy died in Chicago.
מוהולי-נאג'י, לסלו (לדיסלאו)
Moholy-Nagy, László (Ladislaus) (born as Laszlo Weisz), (1895-1946), painter, designer and photographer born in Borsod, Hungary (Thden part of Austria-Hungary). In 1914 he was inducted into the Austro-Hungarian army. In 1917 he was severely wounded on the Russian front. During his convalescence he began drawing portraits and landscapes. Upon his discharge from the army he returned to Budapest, where he obtained the degree of Doctor of Law.

In Berlin he contributed paintings to the Sturm exhibits (1922-25). He taught at the Bauhaus Art University at Weimar, later at Dessau (1923-28), Germany. Under the pressure of political developments in Germany he left the Bauhaus and traveled throughout Europe (Hungary, Switzerland, Finland, Norway, France, Greece, Italy, Amsterdam). Subsequently he went to London, England, where he did publicity work for Imperial Airways and the London Transport Board. From 1937 on he lived in the United States.

From 1937 to 1938 he was principal of the New Bauhaus, Chicago, a school for the education of designers and architects, coordinating art, science and technology, sponsored by the Association of Arts and Industries. When the school closed after one academic year, Moholy-Nagy continued the work, upon enlistment of new faculty members, under the name of School of Design in Chicago which, through its teaching methods, becamne influential in art education in the United States.

In his own work Moholy-Nagy sought to use light as a medium of expression especially in photography and film and to analyze light in his paintings (exhibited in Paris and London, 1937), causing the functions of art and applied art to overlap. His film effects were used in H. G, Well's motion picture "The Shape of Things to Come". In Germany he had designed stage settings. Both in two- and in three-dimensional art he demanded that the creative artist know and use the possibilities afforded by science and technology. Experiments and theories were graphically embodied in such books as "Malerei-Photography-Film" (1925); "Vom Material zur Architektur" (1929); "The New Vision" (New York, 1931 and 1938).

Moholy-Nagy died in Chicago.