חיפוש
הדפסה
שיתוף
הפריט שבחרת:
1 \ 2
נמחקו
נוספו
מקום
רוצה לעזור לנו לשפר את התוכן? אפשר לשלוח הצעות

קהילת יהודי קרואטיה

Croatia

Republika Hrvatska  - Republic of Croatia, a former Yugoslav republic, member of the European Union (EU). 

21st Century

Estimated Jewish population in 2018: 1,700 out of 4,200,000

Koordinacija židovskih općina u Republici Hrvatskoj (Coordinating Committee of the Jewish Communities in Croatia)
Phone: 385 1 4922692
Fax: 385 1 4922694
E-mail: jcz@zg.t-com.hr
Websites: www.zoz.hr` www.croatian-jewish-network.com

 

סוג מקום:
מדינה
מספר פריט:
124491
חובר ע"י חוקרים של אנו מוזיאון העם היהודי
מקומות קרובים:

פריטים קשורים:
Somlyo, Zoltan (1882-1937), poet, translator and journalist, born in Alsodomboru, Hungary (then part of Austria-Hungary, now Donja Dubrava, Croatia). He wrote poetry for many newspapers in various Hungarian cities and published some twenty volumes of poetry and short stories.

They reflected his life of bitter poverty and ceaseless struggle. In the humble atmosphere of his parental home he established many unconscious contacts with the suffering Jewish past and humble resignation, compelling recourse to one's own innermost self. These currents remained dominant throughout his life and nothing could divert them.

Many of his poems are deeply suffused with Jewish feeling, and not only those dedicated to the various phases of religious life, such as "Barmicvo", "Tekiah" and "Az apam" ("My Father"). In "Konnyezo szem" ("Tearful Eye") the spirit of Talmudic Haggadah is alive. All his poetry is highly subjective; the abyss between this life and himself is ever present, but he accepted his fate as a Jew. Although many of his poems belong to the finest specimens of Hungarian poetry, he was wholly ignored by official criticism. He was hardly "a salon star " amongst Jews; he was just a sensitive recording instrument of all the anguish, misfortune and tragic fatality of humankind and especially of his own Jewish people.

In his first published volume he gave himself the name of Az atkozott kolto ("The accursed poet"; 1911). Other volumes of his poetry were: "Eszakra indulok" ("I Set Out Northward"; 1912); "Vegzetes verssorok" ("Fatal Verses"; 1916); "A halal arnyekaban" ("In the Shadow of Death"; 1917); "A ferfi versei" ("Poems of the Man"; 1922); and a posthumous volume of several verse. His "Oszi regeny" ("Autumnal Novel") describes the circle of young poets around Endre Ady at Nagyvarad. He contributed to all Jewish magazines, especially to "Mult es Jovo".

Somlyo died in Budapest.
Frankfurter, David (1909–1982), student of medicine who shot a Nazi official in protest against the persecution of Jews under the Nazi regime. Frankfurter was born in Daruvar, Croatia (then part of the Austria-Hungary). His father was rabbi in Daruvar and later the chief rabbi in Vinkovci. The Frankfurter family moved to Vinkovci in 1914. He graduated from elementary and secondary school, and in 1929 began to study medicine. His father sent him to Germany to study dentistry, first in Leipzig and then, in 1931, to Frankfurt am Main. In the course of his studies he witnessed the Nazi advent to power and the initiation of anti-Jewish measures. He was obliged to leave Germany and so continued his studies in Switzerland, settling in Bern in 1934.

The Nazi movement began to gain ground among the Germans and German speaking Swiss. Convinced of the danger, Frankfurter kept an eye on Wilhelm Gustloff, who as head of the Foreign Section of the Swiss Nazi party (NSDAP), had ordered the Protocols of the Elders of Zion to be published in Switzerland. In 1936, unable to endure further the torrent of insults, humiliations and attacks on the Jewish people even in neutral Switzerland, Frankfurter bought a gun. On 4th February 1936 he went to Gustloff's home, now head of the Nazi party in Switzerland. When Gustloff, who was in the adjoining room, entered his office where Frankfurter was sitting opposite a picture of Hitler, Frankfurter presented himself as a Jew and then shot him five times in the head, neck and chest; he left the premises, went into the next house and asked to use the telephone. He rang the police and confessed to the murder. He then went to the police station and calmly told the police what had happened.

Gustloff was made a Blutzeuge/Martyr of the Nazi cause and his assassination later became part of the official propaganda.Although the assassination was well-received by the largely anti-Nazi population of the country, the Swiss government prosecuted the case strictly owing to concerns about its status of neutrality. Frankfurter was convicted and sentenced to an eighteen-year prison term. At the end of World War II, having served 9 years of his sentence, he applied for a pardon on February 27, 1945 which was granted on June 1, on condition that he left the country and paid court costs.

He settled in Israel and published a book about his experience, Nakam ("Vengeance", 1948). In 1969 the banishment order was rescinded and Frankfurter visited Switzerland. In Israel he worked for the Ministry of Defence and later as an officer in the Israeli army.
Spiller, Ljerko (1908-2008), violinist born in Crikvenica, Croatia. After World War I the family moved to Zagreb, Croatia (then part of Yugoslavia), where he studied violin at the National Music School. He then went to Paris, France, in 1928 and studied at the École Normale de Musique de Paris. Spiller graduated in 1930 and was offered a position as lecturer in the same institution. In 1935 he was awarded a prize at the Warsaw Violin Competition, one of the world's top competitions. Before World War II broke out he succeeded in escaping from Europe and went to Argentina where he settled in Buenos Aires as a violinist, teacher and conductor. He became concertmaster for the LRA Radio del Mundo symphony orchestra and the Buenos Aires Amigos de la Musica. He was made an associate professor emeritus at the University of La Plata and conductor and violinist of festival in Córdoba.

Spiller was frequent guest at master classes in Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Croatia and for some years was a lecturer at Altensteig castle near Stuttgart. Spiller was in 1971 named as the best Argentine professor of instruments, he was awarded OEA and CIDEM honorary diplomas in Washington DC as well as two Argentinian Konex Awards as a teacher for classical music. He was appointed musical adviser to the governments of Germany, France, Switzerland and Austria. On the occasion of the Vaclav Huml sixth international violin competition in 1997, Ljerko Spiller received the Croatian Order of Danica Hrvatska.

Spiller is the author of one of the best violin textbook by which generations of young people study.
תמונות פנים בית הכנסת בדוברובניק,
קרואטיה, 1993
צילום אוקטב מוסקונה
המרכז לתיעוד חזותי ע"ש אוסטר, בית התפוצות,
אוסף אוקטב מוסקונה)

בית הכנסת והמרכז הקהילתי, רייקה, קרואטיה, 2019. בית הכנסת האורתודוקסי הזה נבנה בסגנון מודרניסיטי בעיצובם של האדריכלים ויטוריו אנגיל ופיטרו פברו ונחנך בשנת 1932. המבנה שופץ בשנת 2008.

צילום: חיים ה. גיוזלי.

המרכז לתיעוד חזותי ע"ש אוסטר, בית התפוצות, באדיבות חיים ה. גיוזלי

Somlyo, Zoltan (1882-1937), poet, translator and journalist, born in Alsodomboru, Hungary (then part of Austria-Hungary, now Donja Dubrava, Croatia). He wrote poetry for many newspapers in various Hungarian cities and published some twenty volumes of poetry and short stories.

They reflected his life of bitter poverty and ceaseless struggle. In the humble atmosphere of his parental home he established many unconscious contacts with the suffering Jewish past and humble resignation, compelling recourse to one's own innermost self. These currents remained dominant throughout his life and nothing could divert them.

Many of his poems are deeply suffused with Jewish feeling, and not only those dedicated to the various phases of religious life, such as "Barmicvo", "Tekiah" and "Az apam" ("My Father"). In "Konnyezo szem" ("Tearful Eye") the spirit of Talmudic Haggadah is alive. All his poetry is highly subjective; the abyss between this life and himself is ever present, but he accepted his fate as a Jew. Although many of his poems belong to the finest specimens of Hungarian poetry, he was wholly ignored by official criticism. He was hardly "a salon star " amongst Jews; he was just a sensitive recording instrument of all the anguish, misfortune and tragic fatality of humankind and especially of his own Jewish people.

In his first published volume he gave himself the name of Az atkozott kolto ("The accursed poet"; 1911). Other volumes of his poetry were: "Eszakra indulok" ("I Set Out Northward"; 1912); "Vegzetes verssorok" ("Fatal Verses"; 1916); "A halal arnyekaban" ("In the Shadow of Death"; 1917); "A ferfi versei" ("Poems of the Man"; 1922); and a posthumous volume of several verse. His "Oszi regeny" ("Autumnal Novel") describes the circle of young poets around Endre Ady at Nagyvarad. He contributed to all Jewish magazines, especially to "Mult es Jovo".

Somlyo died in Budapest.
Spiller, Ljerko (1908-2008), violinist born in Crikvenica, Croatia. After World War I the family moved to Zagreb, Croatia (then part of Yugoslavia), where he studied violin at the National Music School. He then went to Paris, France, in 1928 and studied at the École Normale de Musique de Paris. Spiller graduated in 1930 and was offered a position as lecturer in the same institution. In 1935 he was awarded a prize at the Warsaw Violin Competition, one of the world's top competitions. Before World War II broke out he succeeded in escaping from Europe and went to Argentina where he settled in Buenos Aires as a violinist, teacher and conductor. He became concertmaster for the LRA Radio del Mundo symphony orchestra and the Buenos Aires Amigos de la Musica. He was made an associate professor emeritus at the University of La Plata and conductor and violinist of festival in Córdoba.

Spiller was frequent guest at master classes in Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Croatia and for some years was a lecturer at Altensteig castle near Stuttgart. Spiller was in 1971 named as the best Argentine professor of instruments, he was awarded OEA and CIDEM honorary diplomas in Washington DC as well as two Argentinian Konex Awards as a teacher for classical music. He was appointed musical adviser to the governments of Germany, France, Switzerland and Austria. On the occasion of the Vaclav Huml sixth international violin competition in 1997, Ljerko Spiller received the Croatian Order of Danica Hrvatska.

Spiller is the author of one of the best violin textbook by which generations of young people study.
Frankfurter, David (1909–1982), student of medicine who shot a Nazi official in protest against the persecution of Jews under the Nazi regime. Frankfurter was born in Daruvar, Croatia (then part of the Austria-Hungary). His father was rabbi in Daruvar and later the chief rabbi in Vinkovci. The Frankfurter family moved to Vinkovci in 1914. He graduated from elementary and secondary school, and in 1929 began to study medicine. His father sent him to Germany to study dentistry, first in Leipzig and then, in 1931, to Frankfurt am Main. In the course of his studies he witnessed the Nazi advent to power and the initiation of anti-Jewish measures. He was obliged to leave Germany and so continued his studies in Switzerland, settling in Bern in 1934.

The Nazi movement began to gain ground among the Germans and German speaking Swiss. Convinced of the danger, Frankfurter kept an eye on Wilhelm Gustloff, who as head of the Foreign Section of the Swiss Nazi party (NSDAP), had ordered the Protocols of the Elders of Zion to be published in Switzerland. In 1936, unable to endure further the torrent of insults, humiliations and attacks on the Jewish people even in neutral Switzerland, Frankfurter bought a gun. On 4th February 1936 he went to Gustloff's home, now head of the Nazi party in Switzerland. When Gustloff, who was in the adjoining room, entered his office where Frankfurter was sitting opposite a picture of Hitler, Frankfurter presented himself as a Jew and then shot him five times in the head, neck and chest; he left the premises, went into the next house and asked to use the telephone. He rang the police and confessed to the murder. He then went to the police station and calmly told the police what had happened.

Gustloff was made a Blutzeuge/Martyr of the Nazi cause and his assassination later became part of the official propaganda.Although the assassination was well-received by the largely anti-Nazi population of the country, the Swiss government prosecuted the case strictly owing to concerns about its status of neutrality. Frankfurter was convicted and sentenced to an eighteen-year prison term. At the end of World War II, having served 9 years of his sentence, he applied for a pardon on February 27, 1945 which was granted on June 1, on condition that he left the country and paid court costs.

He settled in Israel and published a book about his experience, Nakam ("Vengeance", 1948). In 1969 the banishment order was rescinded and Frankfurter visited Switzerland. In Israel he worked for the Ministry of Defence and later as an officer in the Israeli army.

Slovenia

Republika Slovenija - Republic of Slovenia

A country in central Europe, member of the European Union (EU). Until 1991 part of Yugoslavia. 

21st Century

Estimated Jewish population in 2018: 100 out of 2,100,000.  Main Jewish organization:

Jewish Community of Slovenia
Phone: 386 (0) 31 376 468
Email: office@jewish-community.si  
Website: https://jewish-community.si/

דוברובניק Dubrovnik

(באיטלקית ראגוזה)

עיר נמל בקרואטיה. בעבר ביוגוסלביה.

אחרי גירוש ספרד (1492) עברו בדוברובניק גולים רבים בדרכם לארצות שבשליטת הטורקים, והיו שהשתקעו במקום; עליהם נוספו מגורשי דרום-איטליה בשנים 1515-1514. הצלחתם במסחר גררה צווי- גירוש חוזרים ונשנים, ואלה בוטלו בהתערבות השולטן הטורקי. היהודים סחרו בעיקר בבדים, משי, עורות ותבלינים.

ב-1546 הוקם גיטו והורחב כעבור ארבעים שנה, כאשר הקהילה מנתה 50 איש, מהם בעלי משפחות. היו ביניהם רופאים בשירות המדינה, שטיפלו גם בלא יהודים. משפחת הרב אהרן בן דוד הכהן היתה החשובה ביותר בעיר במאות 17-16; היא הגיעה מפירנצה שבאיטליה ועמדה בקשרי מסחר עם יהודים בכל רחבי אירופה. ב-1614 נתנו השלטונות הקלות לסוחרים יהודיים כדי להניעם להשתקע בעיר. בשל עלילת-דם על יהודי אחד בשם יצחק ישורון (בשנת 1622) עזבו רבים ולזמן מה נותרו בעיר ארבע משפחות בלבד.

הכנסייה לחצה על הסנאט המקומי להצר את רגלי היהודים בעיר, אולם השלטון הטורקי עמד תמיד לימינם וסיכל את המזימות נגדם.

במאה ה-18 מנתה העיר 6,000 תושבים, מזה יותר מ-200 יהודים. בתעודות נזכרים בתי-ספר יהודיים, מורים, מוכר-ספרים יהודי וחתונות יהודיות. יהודים נטלו חלק במסחר הבין-לאומי והיו מחלוצי הביטוח הימי. כאשר ירדה דוברובניק מגדולתה המסחרית נאסר על כל הזרים, ויהודים בכלל זה, לעסוק במסחר, וב-1755 שוב הוגבלו לגיטו.

תחת השלטון הצרפתי בשנים 1815-1808 בוטלו כל ההגבלות על היהודים, וכשהתחלף השלטון הוטלו על יהודי המקום התקנות האוסטריות, וביניהן החובה להשיג בווינה היתר נישואין לזוגות חדשים. שוויון-זכויות מלא ליהודים באימפריה האוסטרית ניתן רק ב-1873.

ב-1939 התגוררו בדוברובניק 250 יהודים.

במהלך מלחמת העולם השנייה נכבשה העיר בידי האיטלקים באפריל 1941 ונכללה במדינה הקרואטית בהנהגת פאווליץ'; הרכוש היהודי הוחרם. האיטלקים מנעו גירוש כללי של יהודים, ולעיר נמלטו פליטים יהודים רבים ממקומות אחרים ביוגוסלאביה. בנובמבר 1942 ריכזו האיטלקים לדרישת הגרמנים את 750 יהודי דוברובניק באי לופוד הסמוך; משם הועברו ביוני 1943 למחנה ראב בצפון-דאלמאטיה, ועמם יהודים אחרים משטחי הכיבוש האיטלקי ביוגוסלאביה. בתקופה שבין הכניעה האיטלקית להשתלטות הגרמנים הועברו רובם בידי פרטיזנים לשטחים משוחררים; את הנותרים שלחו הגרמנים למחנות-השמדה. אחרי המלחמה עלו 28 יהודים משארית הפליטה לארץ-ישראל.

ב- 1969 התגוררו בדוברובניק 31 יהודים; רב הקהילה שימש כרב ראשי לדרום דאלמאטיה, להרצוגובינה ולמונטנגרו. מדי פעם בפעם נערכת תפילה בציבור בבית-הכנסת הישן.

במלחמת בוסניה - קרואטיה בראשית שנות התשעים נפגע בית הכנסת בהפגזות. אחרי המלחמה תוקן המבנה ושופץ במימון קופת הקהילה.

בשנת 1998 היו בקהילה היהודית של דוברובניק שלושים יהודים. כראש הקהילה כיהן ד"ר ברונו הורוביץ, יליד סטאניסלאבוב, פולין.

אופטיה

אבציה, באיטלקית

ספליט Split

(במקורות היהודיים אישפלטרא, באיטלקית ספאלאטו)

עיר נמל בקרואטיה. בעבר יוגוסלביה.


יהודים התיישבו במקום כנראה עוד בימי הרומאים. בסמוך לעיר נתגלה בית-עלמין יהודי מן המאה השלישית לספירה, אבל מציבות יהודיות ראשונות בספליט מקורן במאה ה-16.

באותו הזמן ישבו בעיר יהודים "ספרדים מערביים" יוצאי ספרד או איטליה, ויהודים "ספרדים מזרחיים" משטחי הכיבוש הטורקיים בבלקנים, ולימים התמזגו לקהילה ספרדית אחת. יהודים אשכנזים היו מעטים בעיר, ביניהם הייתה משפחת מורפורגו ממאריבור. זאת הייתה תקופת שלטונה של וונציה (שנמשכה עד המאה ה-19) ויהודי המקום היו משוחררים מעול האינקוויזיציה וזכו בהקלות רבות במסחר עם הקיסרות העותמאנית.

בסוף המאה ה- 16 הקים היהודי דניאל רודריגז נמל חופשי בספליט באישורהסנאט הוונציאני, ויהודי אחר, יוסף פנסו, תרם להרחבתו כעבור מאה שנה. רבים מיהודי ספליט התעשרו, ושלטונות המקום הטילו הגבלות על רכישת נכסי דלא ניידי בידי נוצרים, כדי שלא ימהרו למשכן אותם אצל בעלי-חוב יהודיים.

בהתקפת הטורקים בשנת 1657 הופקדה בידי היהודים הגנת אחד המגדלים בעיר, מאז נודע המגדל בשמו "העמדה היהודית".

בתחילת המאה ה-18 נעשו נסיונות לסלק את היהודים ממסחר במזונות ומעיסוק בחייטות, ובשנת 1738 הוטלו עליהם גזירות, כגון איסור יציאה משכונת מגוריהם (נקבע גיטו) בשעות הלילה, איסור העסקת נוצרים, וחובת לבישת ה"כובע היהודי". הגיטו בוטל בימי המשטר הנפוליוני. אחרי שעברה העיר לשלטון אוסטריה בשנת 1814, הונהגו בה "החוקים היהודיים" של אוסטריה. שוויון זכויות מלא השיגו היהודים רק בשנת 1873.

כבר בסוף המאה ה-18 נותרו בספליט 173 יהודים בלבד, והגירתם, בעיקר לאיטליה, נמשכה כל הזמן, במקום המשפחות היהודיות שהיגרו באו משפחות מקרואטיה ובוסניה.

ערב מלחמת העולם השנייה (ספטמבר 1939) ישבו בספליט קרוב ל- 300 יהודים.


תקופת השואה

בימי המלחמה, כשכבשו האיטלקים את המקום באפריל 1941, נמצאו בספליט כ- 400 יהודים, ביניהם פליטים מאוסטריה, מצ'כוסלובקיה ואחרים. הצבא האיטלקי מנע פגיעות ביהודים, וב-1943 אף הותיר מעבר של כאלפיים פליטים יהודים מקרואטיה.

ביוני 1942 הרס אספסוף קרואטי מוסת את בית הכנסת, את מוסדות הקהילה ובתים ועסקים רבים של יהודים. בלחץ גרמני הוכנסו יהודים למחנות איטלקיים באיי החוף, ובספטמבר 1943, עם כניעת איטליה לבעלות הברית, נמלטו מאות מהם לאיטליה. הנותרים נאלצו להירשם אצל הגרמנים ושולחו למחנה ליד בלגראד. רובם לא שרדו עד תום המלחמה.


אחרי המלחמה שבו יהודים לחיות בספליט. ב-1947 חיו שם 163 יהודים.

ב-1970 התגוררו בספליט כ-120 יהודים. בית- חולים צבאי חדש שהוקם בעיר נקרא על שם הרופא היהודי, ד"ר איזידור פריירא-מוליץ, שהיה מייסד חיל הרפואה היוגוסלאבי.

Yugoslavia

Jugoslavija / Југославија 

A former country in the western Balkan peninsula. Yugoslavia was established as an independent state at the end of World War I and until 1941 was known as the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. The country was ocupied by the Italian and German forces during World War II. It was re-established in 1945 as the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia until its dissolution in 1992.  

Istria

Peninsula in the northern Adriatic, Croatia.

 

History

Jews were living in Istria in the latter part of the 14th century, as there is record of them opening a money lending enterprise in Capodistria in 1380. Other such businesses were established in the towns of Isola, Pirano, Rovigno, Pola, and Veglia.

Jews from Germany settled in Istria in the 1480s, mainly in the towns of Trieste, Muggia, Pirano, Parenzo, and Capodistria. They engaged in banking and trade under the protection of local rulers, and later the republic of Venice.

The most important of the banks was in Pirano. “ Capitoli,” agreements between the municipality and the bankers, approved by the republic of Venice in 1484, show that Pirano was obliged to provide the Jews with animals for slaughter according to Hebrew rites, a field for a cemetery, and to permit them to invite other Jews, including teachers for their sons, to settle in the city. Jewish males above the age of 13 were required to wear an “O” (from GuideO, Italian for Jew) on their clothing, except when travelling through Venetian domains.

In 1502 a German Jew Asher Lemmlein (Lammlin) appeared in Istria announcing the coming of the Messiah within six months, providing the Jews showed great repentance and practiced charity. He predicted that a pillar of cloud and smoke would precede the Jews on their way to Jerusalem. Lemmlein gained many adherents including Christians but he suddenly died or disappeared when his prophecies were not fulfilled. The movement he began came to an abrupt end.

Jewish banks in Istria continued to function with interruptions until the middle of the 17th century. In 1634 a Monti di Pieta, a form of organized charity granting loans at moderate interest run by the Catholic Church as an alternative to money lenders, was established in Pirano, and subsequently others were opened elsewhere in Istria. By the end of the 17th century, having lost their hold on the business of money lending, most Jews left Istria and settled in Italy.

After the middle of the 18th century the only significant Jewish community remaining in Istria was that of Trieste.  

זאגרב ZAGREB

(בגרמנית AGRAM)

בירת הרפובליקה הקרואטית. בעבר העיר השנייה בגודלה ביוגוסלביה.


במאה ה-10 ישבו יהודים בזאגרב, וידועה פנייתו של חסדאי אבן שפרוט לשני נכבדי הקהל בעיר, מר שאול ומר יוסף, למסור איגרת בשמו ליוסף מלך הכוזרים.

במאה ה-13 הגיעו לזאגרב יהודים מצרפת, ממאלטה ומאלבאניה. במאה ה- 15 התיישבו בזאגרב סוחרים יהודים ומלווים בריבית מהונגריה, מבורגנלאנד וממוראביה.

ב-1526 גורשו היהודים מקרואטיה.

היישוב היהודי בזאגרב התחדש כשהתיישבו במקום יוצאי מרכז-אירופה באמצע המאה ה-18 ובשנות ה-40 של המאה ה-19, ומנה כ-50 משפחות. נוסדה קהילה חרדית קטנה (ראשון הרבנים בה היה ר' אהרן פאלוטה) וב-1867 נחנך בית-כנסת חדש (ונהרס ב-1941). הרב הושע יעקובי היה מנהיגה הרוחני של הקהילה במשך 50 שנה, וביוזמתו פעלה הקהילה בתחומי התרבות, החינוך והסעד. הנדבן לודביט שווארץ הקים אז את בית האבות שפעל בקהילה עד שנות השמונים למאה העשרים. ב-1898 הוקם ארגון של תלמידי תיכון וממנו יצאו עסקני ציבור ומנהיגים ציוניים.

זכויות-אזרח ניתנו ליהודים רק ב-1873, וגם זאת למורת רוחם של הנציגים הקרואטים. עם זאת נמצאו יהודים שהזדהו עם התחייה הלאומית הקרואטית, ויהושע פראנק, יהודי מומר, הביא להקמת סיעה על שמו שנעשתה במרוצת הזמן המפלגה האנטישמית בהנהגת פאוליץ' והאוסטאשה.

בין שתי מלחמות-העולם שכן בזאגרב מרכז ההסתדרות הציונית ביוגוסלביה, בהנהגת ד"ר אלכסנדר ליכט. פעלו ארגוני נוער ונשים, מועדון "מכבי" ומקהלה, ויצאו לאור מחשובי העיתונים היהודיים במדינה.

יהודים היו בין חלוצי היצוא (של יינות, עצי-בניין) והתעשייה המקומית (רהיטים, בירה) ובין מפעילי התחבורה. ד"ר מאברו זקס היה מחלוצי הרפואה המשפטית בקרואטיה ודוד שווארץ המציא את ספינת-האוויר שהכשירה את פיתוח ה"צפלין". לאבוסלאב (ליאופולד) הארטמאן אירגן את ספריות-ההשאלה הראשונות בקרואטיה וייסד בית-דפוס. עד 1941 יצא לאור בזאגרב במשך חמש שנים כתב-עת לאמנות יהודית.

ערב מלחמת העולם השנייה התגוררו בזאגרב כ-12,000 יהודים.


תקופת השואה

במהלך מלחמת העולם השנייה, ב-25 במרס 1941, הצטרפה יוגוסלביה המלוכנית להסכם המשולש (רומא-ברלין-טוקיו). ב-10 באפריל אותה השנה נכנסו הגרמנים לזאגרב והפאשיסטים המקומיים הכריזו על הקמת "מדינה עצמאית קרואטית". היהודים והסרבים הוצאו מחוץ לחוק. היהודים סבלו מרדיפות, רבים נשלחו לעבודות כפייה במיכרות המלח והשאר שולחו למחנות-ריכוז.

בינואר 1942 גורשו כל יהודי זאגרב מהעיר ורכושם הוחרם.

עם שחרורה של זאגרב ב-1945 נותרו בעיר כ-3,000 יהודים.

יהודי יוגוסלביה לקחו חלק חשוב בתנועה האנטי-פאשיסטית ובמלחמה לשחרור הארץ. הם היו בין מארגני המרד הראשונים ויותר מ-10 יהודים עוטרו באות הגבורה הגבוה ביותר "גבור עממי של יוגוסלביה". ביניהם היו: פאוול פאפו וד"ר סטפן פוליצר.

ב-1970 מנתה הקהילה היהודית בזאגרב כ-1,300 נפש.

רייקה Rijeka

שמה האיטלקי פיומה

עיר-נמל בקרואטיה.


עד 1918 הייתה באוסטריה-הונגריה, מאז ועד 1945 באיטליה; אחרי מלחמת העולם השנייה ביוגוסלאביה.

בשנת 1717 הוכרזה רייקה עיר חופשית, וכעבור שישים שנה - כנמלה של הונגריה. עד אמצע המאה ה-19 הייתה הקהילה המקומית ספרדית ברובה, של יוצאי ספליט ודוברובניק, שהתפללו ב"נוסח איספלטו". אחרי 1848 הצטרפו ל"הונגארים" גם יוצאי גרמניה, בוהמיה ואיטליה. בית-כנסת חדש הוקם ב-1902 ואותו זמן מנה היישוב היהודי כולו כאלפיים נפש. בעקבות הרפורמה בשנת 1930 הייתה פיומה הקהילה האורתודוקסית היחידה באיטליה; הדרשות היו נמסרות בגרמנית או באיטלקית. ב-1920 ישבו בפיומה ובאבאציה הסמוכה כ- 1,300 יהודים.

עם הפעלת חוקי הגזע באיטליה ב-1938 הוטלו הגבלות על יהודים אזרחי המדינה; על יהודי חוץ נגזר מעצר במחנות. ג'ובאני פאלאטוצ'י, ראש מחלקת הזרים במשטרת פיומה, המציא ליהודים ניירות "אריים" ורבים מהם שלח לדודו הבישוף בדרום-איטליה ולמוסדות לטיפול באנשים שנפשם התערערה בתנאי המלחמה. אחרי כיבוש יוגוסלאביה באפריל 1941 השתלט הצבא האיטלקי על דאלמאטיה ועל חלקים אחרים בקרואטיה הקוויזלינגית. נמצאו קצינים איטלקיים שסייעו לקבוצת פאלאטוצ'י והעבירו אליה כ-500 פליטים מקרואטיה. עם כניעת איטליה בספטמבר 1943 השמיד פאלאטוצ'י את התיקים במשרדו והזהיר את היהודים מפני המאסר הצפוי מידי הגרמנים; רובם נשארו בחיים. פאלאטוצ'י עצמו נאסר בספטמבר 1944 ומת בדאכאו כעבור שנה.


אחרי המלחמה המשיכו יהודים לחיות ברייקה, ב-1947 התגוררו ברייקה היוגוסלאבית ובסביבה כ-170 יהודים. ב-1970 חיו בעיר כמאה יהודים.

הקהילות היהודיות של רייקה ואופטיה בין שתי מלחמות העולם (איטלקית ואנגלית)
http://www.bh.org.il/jewish-spotlight/fiume/?page_id=1150
במאגרי המידע הפתוחים
גניאולוגיה יהודית
שמות משפחה
קהילות יהודיות
תיעוד חזותי
מרכז המוזיקה היהודית
מקום
אA
אA
אA
רוצה לעזור לנו לשפר את התוכן? אפשר לשלוח הצעות
קהילת יהודי קרואטיה

Croatia

Republika Hrvatska  - Republic of Croatia, a former Yugoslav republic, member of the European Union (EU). 

21st Century

Estimated Jewish population in 2018: 1,700 out of 4,200,000

Koordinacija židovskih općina u Republici Hrvatskoj (Coordinating Committee of the Jewish Communities in Croatia)
Phone: 385 1 4922692
Fax: 385 1 4922694
E-mail: jcz@zg.t-com.hr
Websites: www.zoz.hr` www.croatian-jewish-network.com

 

חובר ע"י חוקרים של אנו מוזיאון העם היהודי

רייקה
זאגרב
ISTRIA
יוגוסלביה
ספליט
אופטיה
דוברובניק
סלובניה
רייקה Rijeka

שמה האיטלקי פיומה

עיר-נמל בקרואטיה.


עד 1918 הייתה באוסטריה-הונגריה, מאז ועד 1945 באיטליה; אחרי מלחמת העולם השנייה ביוגוסלאביה.

בשנת 1717 הוכרזה רייקה עיר חופשית, וכעבור שישים שנה - כנמלה של הונגריה. עד אמצע המאה ה-19 הייתה הקהילה המקומית ספרדית ברובה, של יוצאי ספליט ודוברובניק, שהתפללו ב"נוסח איספלטו". אחרי 1848 הצטרפו ל"הונגארים" גם יוצאי גרמניה, בוהמיה ואיטליה. בית-כנסת חדש הוקם ב-1902 ואותו זמן מנה היישוב היהודי כולו כאלפיים נפש. בעקבות הרפורמה בשנת 1930 הייתה פיומה הקהילה האורתודוקסית היחידה באיטליה; הדרשות היו נמסרות בגרמנית או באיטלקית. ב-1920 ישבו בפיומה ובאבאציה הסמוכה כ- 1,300 יהודים.

עם הפעלת חוקי הגזע באיטליה ב-1938 הוטלו הגבלות על יהודים אזרחי המדינה; על יהודי חוץ נגזר מעצר במחנות. ג'ובאני פאלאטוצ'י, ראש מחלקת הזרים במשטרת פיומה, המציא ליהודים ניירות "אריים" ורבים מהם שלח לדודו הבישוף בדרום-איטליה ולמוסדות לטיפול באנשים שנפשם התערערה בתנאי המלחמה. אחרי כיבוש יוגוסלאביה באפריל 1941 השתלט הצבא האיטלקי על דאלמאטיה ועל חלקים אחרים בקרואטיה הקוויזלינגית. נמצאו קצינים איטלקיים שסייעו לקבוצת פאלאטוצ'י והעבירו אליה כ-500 פליטים מקרואטיה. עם כניעת איטליה בספטמבר 1943 השמיד פאלאטוצ'י את התיקים במשרדו והזהיר את היהודים מפני המאסר הצפוי מידי הגרמנים; רובם נשארו בחיים. פאלאטוצ'י עצמו נאסר בספטמבר 1944 ומת בדאכאו כעבור שנה.


אחרי המלחמה המשיכו יהודים לחיות ברייקה, ב-1947 התגוררו ברייקה היוגוסלאבית ובסביבה כ-170 יהודים. ב-1970 חיו בעיר כמאה יהודים.

הקהילות היהודיות של רייקה ואופטיה בין שתי מלחמות העולם (איטלקית ואנגלית)
http://www.bh.org.il/jewish-spotlight/fiume/?page_id=1150
זאגרב ZAGREB

(בגרמנית AGRAM)

בירת הרפובליקה הקרואטית. בעבר העיר השנייה בגודלה ביוגוסלביה.


במאה ה-10 ישבו יהודים בזאגרב, וידועה פנייתו של חסדאי אבן שפרוט לשני נכבדי הקהל בעיר, מר שאול ומר יוסף, למסור איגרת בשמו ליוסף מלך הכוזרים.

במאה ה-13 הגיעו לזאגרב יהודים מצרפת, ממאלטה ומאלבאניה. במאה ה- 15 התיישבו בזאגרב סוחרים יהודים ומלווים בריבית מהונגריה, מבורגנלאנד וממוראביה.

ב-1526 גורשו היהודים מקרואטיה.

היישוב היהודי בזאגרב התחדש כשהתיישבו במקום יוצאי מרכז-אירופה באמצע המאה ה-18 ובשנות ה-40 של המאה ה-19, ומנה כ-50 משפחות. נוסדה קהילה חרדית קטנה (ראשון הרבנים בה היה ר' אהרן פאלוטה) וב-1867 נחנך בית-כנסת חדש (ונהרס ב-1941). הרב הושע יעקובי היה מנהיגה הרוחני של הקהילה במשך 50 שנה, וביוזמתו פעלה הקהילה בתחומי התרבות, החינוך והסעד. הנדבן לודביט שווארץ הקים אז את בית האבות שפעל בקהילה עד שנות השמונים למאה העשרים. ב-1898 הוקם ארגון של תלמידי תיכון וממנו יצאו עסקני ציבור ומנהיגים ציוניים.

זכויות-אזרח ניתנו ליהודים רק ב-1873, וגם זאת למורת רוחם של הנציגים הקרואטים. עם זאת נמצאו יהודים שהזדהו עם התחייה הלאומית הקרואטית, ויהושע פראנק, יהודי מומר, הביא להקמת סיעה על שמו שנעשתה במרוצת הזמן המפלגה האנטישמית בהנהגת פאוליץ' והאוסטאשה.

בין שתי מלחמות-העולם שכן בזאגרב מרכז ההסתדרות הציונית ביוגוסלביה, בהנהגת ד"ר אלכסנדר ליכט. פעלו ארגוני נוער ונשים, מועדון "מכבי" ומקהלה, ויצאו לאור מחשובי העיתונים היהודיים במדינה.

יהודים היו בין חלוצי היצוא (של יינות, עצי-בניין) והתעשייה המקומית (רהיטים, בירה) ובין מפעילי התחבורה. ד"ר מאברו זקס היה מחלוצי הרפואה המשפטית בקרואטיה ודוד שווארץ המציא את ספינת-האוויר שהכשירה את פיתוח ה"צפלין". לאבוסלאב (ליאופולד) הארטמאן אירגן את ספריות-ההשאלה הראשונות בקרואטיה וייסד בית-דפוס. עד 1941 יצא לאור בזאגרב במשך חמש שנים כתב-עת לאמנות יהודית.

ערב מלחמת העולם השנייה התגוררו בזאגרב כ-12,000 יהודים.


תקופת השואה

במהלך מלחמת העולם השנייה, ב-25 במרס 1941, הצטרפה יוגוסלביה המלוכנית להסכם המשולש (רומא-ברלין-טוקיו). ב-10 באפריל אותה השנה נכנסו הגרמנים לזאגרב והפאשיסטים המקומיים הכריזו על הקמת "מדינה עצמאית קרואטית". היהודים והסרבים הוצאו מחוץ לחוק. היהודים סבלו מרדיפות, רבים נשלחו לעבודות כפייה במיכרות המלח והשאר שולחו למחנות-ריכוז.

בינואר 1942 גורשו כל יהודי זאגרב מהעיר ורכושם הוחרם.

עם שחרורה של זאגרב ב-1945 נותרו בעיר כ-3,000 יהודים.

יהודי יוגוסלביה לקחו חלק חשוב בתנועה האנטי-פאשיסטית ובמלחמה לשחרור הארץ. הם היו בין מארגני המרד הראשונים ויותר מ-10 יהודים עוטרו באות הגבורה הגבוה ביותר "גבור עממי של יוגוסלביה". ביניהם היו: פאוול פאפו וד"ר סטפן פוליצר.

ב-1970 מנתה הקהילה היהודית בזאגרב כ-1,300 נפש.

Istria

Peninsula in the northern Adriatic, Croatia.

 

History

Jews were living in Istria in the latter part of the 14th century, as there is record of them opening a money lending enterprise in Capodistria in 1380. Other such businesses were established in the towns of Isola, Pirano, Rovigno, Pola, and Veglia.

Jews from Germany settled in Istria in the 1480s, mainly in the towns of Trieste, Muggia, Pirano, Parenzo, and Capodistria. They engaged in banking and trade under the protection of local rulers, and later the republic of Venice.

The most important of the banks was in Pirano. “ Capitoli,” agreements between the municipality and the bankers, approved by the republic of Venice in 1484, show that Pirano was obliged to provide the Jews with animals for slaughter according to Hebrew rites, a field for a cemetery, and to permit them to invite other Jews, including teachers for their sons, to settle in the city. Jewish males above the age of 13 were required to wear an “O” (from GuideO, Italian for Jew) on their clothing, except when travelling through Venetian domains.

In 1502 a German Jew Asher Lemmlein (Lammlin) appeared in Istria announcing the coming of the Messiah within six months, providing the Jews showed great repentance and practiced charity. He predicted that a pillar of cloud and smoke would precede the Jews on their way to Jerusalem. Lemmlein gained many adherents including Christians but he suddenly died or disappeared when his prophecies were not fulfilled. The movement he began came to an abrupt end.

Jewish banks in Istria continued to function with interruptions until the middle of the 17th century. In 1634 a Monti di Pieta, a form of organized charity granting loans at moderate interest run by the Catholic Church as an alternative to money lenders, was established in Pirano, and subsequently others were opened elsewhere in Istria. By the end of the 17th century, having lost their hold on the business of money lending, most Jews left Istria and settled in Italy.

After the middle of the 18th century the only significant Jewish community remaining in Istria was that of Trieste.  

Yugoslavia

Jugoslavija / Југославија 

A former country in the western Balkan peninsula. Yugoslavia was established as an independent state at the end of World War I and until 1941 was known as the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. The country was ocupied by the Italian and German forces during World War II. It was re-established in 1945 as the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia until its dissolution in 1992.  

ספליט Split

(במקורות היהודיים אישפלטרא, באיטלקית ספאלאטו)

עיר נמל בקרואטיה. בעבר יוגוסלביה.


יהודים התיישבו במקום כנראה עוד בימי הרומאים. בסמוך לעיר נתגלה בית-עלמין יהודי מן המאה השלישית לספירה, אבל מציבות יהודיות ראשונות בספליט מקורן במאה ה-16.

באותו הזמן ישבו בעיר יהודים "ספרדים מערביים" יוצאי ספרד או איטליה, ויהודים "ספרדים מזרחיים" משטחי הכיבוש הטורקיים בבלקנים, ולימים התמזגו לקהילה ספרדית אחת. יהודים אשכנזים היו מעטים בעיר, ביניהם הייתה משפחת מורפורגו ממאריבור. זאת הייתה תקופת שלטונה של וונציה (שנמשכה עד המאה ה-19) ויהודי המקום היו משוחררים מעול האינקוויזיציה וזכו בהקלות רבות במסחר עם הקיסרות העותמאנית.

בסוף המאה ה- 16 הקים היהודי דניאל רודריגז נמל חופשי בספליט באישורהסנאט הוונציאני, ויהודי אחר, יוסף פנסו, תרם להרחבתו כעבור מאה שנה. רבים מיהודי ספליט התעשרו, ושלטונות המקום הטילו הגבלות על רכישת נכסי דלא ניידי בידי נוצרים, כדי שלא ימהרו למשכן אותם אצל בעלי-חוב יהודיים.

בהתקפת הטורקים בשנת 1657 הופקדה בידי היהודים הגנת אחד המגדלים בעיר, מאז נודע המגדל בשמו "העמדה היהודית".

בתחילת המאה ה-18 נעשו נסיונות לסלק את היהודים ממסחר במזונות ומעיסוק בחייטות, ובשנת 1738 הוטלו עליהם גזירות, כגון איסור יציאה משכונת מגוריהם (נקבע גיטו) בשעות הלילה, איסור העסקת נוצרים, וחובת לבישת ה"כובע היהודי". הגיטו בוטל בימי המשטר הנפוליוני. אחרי שעברה העיר לשלטון אוסטריה בשנת 1814, הונהגו בה "החוקים היהודיים" של אוסטריה. שוויון זכויות מלא השיגו היהודים רק בשנת 1873.

כבר בסוף המאה ה-18 נותרו בספליט 173 יהודים בלבד, והגירתם, בעיקר לאיטליה, נמשכה כל הזמן, במקום המשפחות היהודיות שהיגרו באו משפחות מקרואטיה ובוסניה.

ערב מלחמת העולם השנייה (ספטמבר 1939) ישבו בספליט קרוב ל- 300 יהודים.


תקופת השואה

בימי המלחמה, כשכבשו האיטלקים את המקום באפריל 1941, נמצאו בספליט כ- 400 יהודים, ביניהם פליטים מאוסטריה, מצ'כוסלובקיה ואחרים. הצבא האיטלקי מנע פגיעות ביהודים, וב-1943 אף הותיר מעבר של כאלפיים פליטים יהודים מקרואטיה.

ביוני 1942 הרס אספסוף קרואטי מוסת את בית הכנסת, את מוסדות הקהילה ובתים ועסקים רבים של יהודים. בלחץ גרמני הוכנסו יהודים למחנות איטלקיים באיי החוף, ובספטמבר 1943, עם כניעת איטליה לבעלות הברית, נמלטו מאות מהם לאיטליה. הנותרים נאלצו להירשם אצל הגרמנים ושולחו למחנה ליד בלגראד. רובם לא שרדו עד תום המלחמה.


אחרי המלחמה שבו יהודים לחיות בספליט. ב-1947 חיו שם 163 יהודים.

ב-1970 התגוררו בספליט כ-120 יהודים. בית- חולים צבאי חדש שהוקם בעיר נקרא על שם הרופא היהודי, ד"ר איזידור פריירא-מוליץ, שהיה מייסד חיל הרפואה היוגוסלאבי.
אופטיה

אבציה, באיטלקית
דוברובניק Dubrovnik

(באיטלקית ראגוזה)

עיר נמל בקרואטיה. בעבר ביוגוסלביה.

אחרי גירוש ספרד (1492) עברו בדוברובניק גולים רבים בדרכם לארצות שבשליטת הטורקים, והיו שהשתקעו במקום; עליהם נוספו מגורשי דרום-איטליה בשנים 1515-1514. הצלחתם במסחר גררה צווי- גירוש חוזרים ונשנים, ואלה בוטלו בהתערבות השולטן הטורקי. היהודים סחרו בעיקר בבדים, משי, עורות ותבלינים.

ב-1546 הוקם גיטו והורחב כעבור ארבעים שנה, כאשר הקהילה מנתה 50 איש, מהם בעלי משפחות. היו ביניהם רופאים בשירות המדינה, שטיפלו גם בלא יהודים. משפחת הרב אהרן בן דוד הכהן היתה החשובה ביותר בעיר במאות 17-16; היא הגיעה מפירנצה שבאיטליה ועמדה בקשרי מסחר עם יהודים בכל רחבי אירופה. ב-1614 נתנו השלטונות הקלות לסוחרים יהודיים כדי להניעם להשתקע בעיר. בשל עלילת-דם על יהודי אחד בשם יצחק ישורון (בשנת 1622) עזבו רבים ולזמן מה נותרו בעיר ארבע משפחות בלבד.

הכנסייה לחצה על הסנאט המקומי להצר את רגלי היהודים בעיר, אולם השלטון הטורקי עמד תמיד לימינם וסיכל את המזימות נגדם.

במאה ה-18 מנתה העיר 6,000 תושבים, מזה יותר מ-200 יהודים. בתעודות נזכרים בתי-ספר יהודיים, מורים, מוכר-ספרים יהודי וחתונות יהודיות. יהודים נטלו חלק במסחר הבין-לאומי והיו מחלוצי הביטוח הימי. כאשר ירדה דוברובניק מגדולתה המסחרית נאסר על כל הזרים, ויהודים בכלל זה, לעסוק במסחר, וב-1755 שוב הוגבלו לגיטו.

תחת השלטון הצרפתי בשנים 1815-1808 בוטלו כל ההגבלות על היהודים, וכשהתחלף השלטון הוטלו על יהודי המקום התקנות האוסטריות, וביניהן החובה להשיג בווינה היתר נישואין לזוגות חדשים. שוויון-זכויות מלא ליהודים באימפריה האוסטרית ניתן רק ב-1873.

ב-1939 התגוררו בדוברובניק 250 יהודים.

במהלך מלחמת העולם השנייה נכבשה העיר בידי האיטלקים באפריל 1941 ונכללה במדינה הקרואטית בהנהגת פאווליץ'; הרכוש היהודי הוחרם. האיטלקים מנעו גירוש כללי של יהודים, ולעיר נמלטו פליטים יהודים רבים ממקומות אחרים ביוגוסלאביה. בנובמבר 1942 ריכזו האיטלקים לדרישת הגרמנים את 750 יהודי דוברובניק באי לופוד הסמוך; משם הועברו ביוני 1943 למחנה ראב בצפון-דאלמאטיה, ועמם יהודים אחרים משטחי הכיבוש האיטלקי ביוגוסלאביה. בתקופה שבין הכניעה האיטלקית להשתלטות הגרמנים הועברו רובם בידי פרטיזנים לשטחים משוחררים; את הנותרים שלחו הגרמנים למחנות-השמדה. אחרי המלחמה עלו 28 יהודים משארית הפליטה לארץ-ישראל.

ב- 1969 התגוררו בדוברובניק 31 יהודים; רב הקהילה שימש כרב ראשי לדרום דאלמאטיה, להרצוגובינה ולמונטנגרו. מדי פעם בפעם נערכת תפילה בציבור בבית-הכנסת הישן.

במלחמת בוסניה - קרואטיה בראשית שנות התשעים נפגע בית הכנסת בהפגזות. אחרי המלחמה תוקן המבנה ושופץ במימון קופת הקהילה.

בשנת 1998 היו בקהילה היהודית של דוברובניק שלושים יהודים. כראש הקהילה כיהן ד"ר ברונו הורוביץ, יליד סטאניסלאבוב, פולין.

Slovenia

Republika Slovenija - Republic of Slovenia

A country in central Europe, member of the European Union (EU). Until 1991 part of Yugoslavia. 

21st Century

Estimated Jewish population in 2018: 100 out of 2,100,000.  Main Jewish organization:

Jewish Community of Slovenia
Phone: 386 (0) 31 376 468
Email: office@jewish-community.si  
Website: https://jewish-community.si/

יוגוסלביה

Yugoslavia

Jugoslavija / Југославија 

A former country in the western Balkan peninsula. Yugoslavia was established as an independent state at the end of World War I and until 1941 was known as the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. The country was ocupied by the Italian and German forces during World War II. It was re-established in 1945 as the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia until its dissolution in 1992.  

בית הכנסת והמרכז הקהילתי, רייקה, קרואטיה, 2019
תמונות פנים בית הכנסת בדוברובניק, קרואטיה, 1993

בית הכנסת והמרכז הקהילתי, רייקה, קרואטיה, 2019. בית הכנסת האורתודוקסי הזה נבנה בסגנון מודרניסיטי בעיצובם של האדריכלים ויטוריו אנגיל ופיטרו פברו ונחנך בשנת 1932. המבנה שופץ בשנת 2008.

צילום: חיים ה. גיוזלי.

המרכז לתיעוד חזותי ע"ש אוסטר, בית התפוצות, באדיבות חיים ה. גיוזלי

תמונות פנים בית הכנסת בדוברובניק,
קרואטיה, 1993
צילום אוקטב מוסקונה
המרכז לתיעוד חזותי ע"ש אוסטר, בית התפוצות,
אוסף אוקטב מוסקונה)
שפילר, ליארקו
פרנקפורטר, דויד
שומליו, זולטן
Spiller, Ljerko (1908-2008), violinist born in Crikvenica, Croatia. After World War I the family moved to Zagreb, Croatia (then part of Yugoslavia), where he studied violin at the National Music School. He then went to Paris, France, in 1928 and studied at the École Normale de Musique de Paris. Spiller graduated in 1930 and was offered a position as lecturer in the same institution. In 1935 he was awarded a prize at the Warsaw Violin Competition, one of the world's top competitions. Before World War II broke out he succeeded in escaping from Europe and went to Argentina where he settled in Buenos Aires as a violinist, teacher and conductor. He became concertmaster for the LRA Radio del Mundo symphony orchestra and the Buenos Aires Amigos de la Musica. He was made an associate professor emeritus at the University of La Plata and conductor and violinist of festival in Córdoba.

Spiller was frequent guest at master classes in Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Croatia and for some years was a lecturer at Altensteig castle near Stuttgart. Spiller was in 1971 named as the best Argentine professor of instruments, he was awarded OEA and CIDEM honorary diplomas in Washington DC as well as two Argentinian Konex Awards as a teacher for classical music. He was appointed musical adviser to the governments of Germany, France, Switzerland and Austria. On the occasion of the Vaclav Huml sixth international violin competition in 1997, Ljerko Spiller received the Croatian Order of Danica Hrvatska.

Spiller is the author of one of the best violin textbook by which generations of young people study.
Frankfurter, David (1909–1982), student of medicine who shot a Nazi official in protest against the persecution of Jews under the Nazi regime. Frankfurter was born in Daruvar, Croatia (then part of the Austria-Hungary). His father was rabbi in Daruvar and later the chief rabbi in Vinkovci. The Frankfurter family moved to Vinkovci in 1914. He graduated from elementary and secondary school, and in 1929 began to study medicine. His father sent him to Germany to study dentistry, first in Leipzig and then, in 1931, to Frankfurt am Main. In the course of his studies he witnessed the Nazi advent to power and the initiation of anti-Jewish measures. He was obliged to leave Germany and so continued his studies in Switzerland, settling in Bern in 1934.

The Nazi movement began to gain ground among the Germans and German speaking Swiss. Convinced of the danger, Frankfurter kept an eye on Wilhelm Gustloff, who as head of the Foreign Section of the Swiss Nazi party (NSDAP), had ordered the Protocols of the Elders of Zion to be published in Switzerland. In 1936, unable to endure further the torrent of insults, humiliations and attacks on the Jewish people even in neutral Switzerland, Frankfurter bought a gun. On 4th February 1936 he went to Gustloff's home, now head of the Nazi party in Switzerland. When Gustloff, who was in the adjoining room, entered his office where Frankfurter was sitting opposite a picture of Hitler, Frankfurter presented himself as a Jew and then shot him five times in the head, neck and chest; he left the premises, went into the next house and asked to use the telephone. He rang the police and confessed to the murder. He then went to the police station and calmly told the police what had happened.

Gustloff was made a Blutzeuge/Martyr of the Nazi cause and his assassination later became part of the official propaganda.Although the assassination was well-received by the largely anti-Nazi population of the country, the Swiss government prosecuted the case strictly owing to concerns about its status of neutrality. Frankfurter was convicted and sentenced to an eighteen-year prison term. At the end of World War II, having served 9 years of his sentence, he applied for a pardon on February 27, 1945 which was granted on June 1, on condition that he left the country and paid court costs.

He settled in Israel and published a book about his experience, Nakam ("Vengeance", 1948). In 1969 the banishment order was rescinded and Frankfurter visited Switzerland. In Israel he worked for the Ministry of Defence and later as an officer in the Israeli army.
Somlyo, Zoltan (1882-1937), poet, translator and journalist, born in Alsodomboru, Hungary (then part of Austria-Hungary, now Donja Dubrava, Croatia). He wrote poetry for many newspapers in various Hungarian cities and published some twenty volumes of poetry and short stories.

They reflected his life of bitter poverty and ceaseless struggle. In the humble atmosphere of his parental home he established many unconscious contacts with the suffering Jewish past and humble resignation, compelling recourse to one's own innermost self. These currents remained dominant throughout his life and nothing could divert them.

Many of his poems are deeply suffused with Jewish feeling, and not only those dedicated to the various phases of religious life, such as "Barmicvo", "Tekiah" and "Az apam" ("My Father"). In "Konnyezo szem" ("Tearful Eye") the spirit of Talmudic Haggadah is alive. All his poetry is highly subjective; the abyss between this life and himself is ever present, but he accepted his fate as a Jew. Although many of his poems belong to the finest specimens of Hungarian poetry, he was wholly ignored by official criticism. He was hardly "a salon star " amongst Jews; he was just a sensitive recording instrument of all the anguish, misfortune and tragic fatality of humankind and especially of his own Jewish people.

In his first published volume he gave himself the name of Az atkozott kolto ("The accursed poet"; 1911). Other volumes of his poetry were: "Eszakra indulok" ("I Set Out Northward"; 1912); "Vegzetes verssorok" ("Fatal Verses"; 1916); "A halal arnyekaban" ("In the Shadow of Death"; 1917); "A ferfi versei" ("Poems of the Man"; 1922); and a posthumous volume of several verse. His "Oszi regeny" ("Autumnal Novel") describes the circle of young poets around Endre Ady at Nagyvarad. He contributed to all Jewish magazines, especially to "Mult es Jovo".

Somlyo died in Budapest.
שפילר, ליארקו
פרנקפורטר, דויד
שומליו, זולטן
Spiller, Ljerko (1908-2008), violinist born in Crikvenica, Croatia. After World War I the family moved to Zagreb, Croatia (then part of Yugoslavia), where he studied violin at the National Music School. He then went to Paris, France, in 1928 and studied at the École Normale de Musique de Paris. Spiller graduated in 1930 and was offered a position as lecturer in the same institution. In 1935 he was awarded a prize at the Warsaw Violin Competition, one of the world's top competitions. Before World War II broke out he succeeded in escaping from Europe and went to Argentina where he settled in Buenos Aires as a violinist, teacher and conductor. He became concertmaster for the LRA Radio del Mundo symphony orchestra and the Buenos Aires Amigos de la Musica. He was made an associate professor emeritus at the University of La Plata and conductor and violinist of festival in Córdoba.

Spiller was frequent guest at master classes in Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Croatia and for some years was a lecturer at Altensteig castle near Stuttgart. Spiller was in 1971 named as the best Argentine professor of instruments, he was awarded OEA and CIDEM honorary diplomas in Washington DC as well as two Argentinian Konex Awards as a teacher for classical music. He was appointed musical adviser to the governments of Germany, France, Switzerland and Austria. On the occasion of the Vaclav Huml sixth international violin competition in 1997, Ljerko Spiller received the Croatian Order of Danica Hrvatska.

Spiller is the author of one of the best violin textbook by which generations of young people study.
Frankfurter, David (1909–1982), student of medicine who shot a Nazi official in protest against the persecution of Jews under the Nazi regime. Frankfurter was born in Daruvar, Croatia (then part of the Austria-Hungary). His father was rabbi in Daruvar and later the chief rabbi in Vinkovci. The Frankfurter family moved to Vinkovci in 1914. He graduated from elementary and secondary school, and in 1929 began to study medicine. His father sent him to Germany to study dentistry, first in Leipzig and then, in 1931, to Frankfurt am Main. In the course of his studies he witnessed the Nazi advent to power and the initiation of anti-Jewish measures. He was obliged to leave Germany and so continued his studies in Switzerland, settling in Bern in 1934.

The Nazi movement began to gain ground among the Germans and German speaking Swiss. Convinced of the danger, Frankfurter kept an eye on Wilhelm Gustloff, who as head of the Foreign Section of the Swiss Nazi party (NSDAP), had ordered the Protocols of the Elders of Zion to be published in Switzerland. In 1936, unable to endure further the torrent of insults, humiliations and attacks on the Jewish people even in neutral Switzerland, Frankfurter bought a gun. On 4th February 1936 he went to Gustloff's home, now head of the Nazi party in Switzerland. When Gustloff, who was in the adjoining room, entered his office where Frankfurter was sitting opposite a picture of Hitler, Frankfurter presented himself as a Jew and then shot him five times in the head, neck and chest; he left the premises, went into the next house and asked to use the telephone. He rang the police and confessed to the murder. He then went to the police station and calmly told the police what had happened.

Gustloff was made a Blutzeuge/Martyr of the Nazi cause and his assassination later became part of the official propaganda.Although the assassination was well-received by the largely anti-Nazi population of the country, the Swiss government prosecuted the case strictly owing to concerns about its status of neutrality. Frankfurter was convicted and sentenced to an eighteen-year prison term. At the end of World War II, having served 9 years of his sentence, he applied for a pardon on February 27, 1945 which was granted on June 1, on condition that he left the country and paid court costs.

He settled in Israel and published a book about his experience, Nakam ("Vengeance", 1948). In 1969 the banishment order was rescinded and Frankfurter visited Switzerland. In Israel he worked for the Ministry of Defence and later as an officer in the Israeli army.
Somlyo, Zoltan (1882-1937), poet, translator and journalist, born in Alsodomboru, Hungary (then part of Austria-Hungary, now Donja Dubrava, Croatia). He wrote poetry for many newspapers in various Hungarian cities and published some twenty volumes of poetry and short stories.

They reflected his life of bitter poverty and ceaseless struggle. In the humble atmosphere of his parental home he established many unconscious contacts with the suffering Jewish past and humble resignation, compelling recourse to one's own innermost self. These currents remained dominant throughout his life and nothing could divert them.

Many of his poems are deeply suffused with Jewish feeling, and not only those dedicated to the various phases of religious life, such as "Barmicvo", "Tekiah" and "Az apam" ("My Father"). In "Konnyezo szem" ("Tearful Eye") the spirit of Talmudic Haggadah is alive. All his poetry is highly subjective; the abyss between this life and himself is ever present, but he accepted his fate as a Jew. Although many of his poems belong to the finest specimens of Hungarian poetry, he was wholly ignored by official criticism. He was hardly "a salon star " amongst Jews; he was just a sensitive recording instrument of all the anguish, misfortune and tragic fatality of humankind and especially of his own Jewish people.

In his first published volume he gave himself the name of Az atkozott kolto ("The accursed poet"; 1911). Other volumes of his poetry were: "Eszakra indulok" ("I Set Out Northward"; 1912); "Vegzetes verssorok" ("Fatal Verses"; 1916); "A halal arnyekaban" ("In the Shadow of Death"; 1917); "A ferfi versei" ("Poems of the Man"; 1922); and a posthumous volume of several verse. His "Oszi regeny" ("Autumnal Novel") describes the circle of young poets around Endre Ady at Nagyvarad. He contributed to all Jewish magazines, especially to "Mult es Jovo".

Somlyo died in Budapest.