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ROTH Origin of surname

ROTH

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from a physical characteristic or nickname. It is also an artificial color name.

Rot(h) means "red" in German. It was a nickname for a person with red hair or a red beard.In late 18th century many central European rulers began forcing the Jews to adopt fixed, hereditary family names. Many of the personal nicknames and titles then became family names.

Distinguished bearers of the Jewish family name Roth include the English historian Cecil (Bezalel) Roth (1899-1970), editor-in-chief of the Encyclopaedia Judaica; the 20th century Austrian-born American novelist Henry Roth, and the 20th century American novelist Philip Milton Roth. Lieutenant Danny Menachem Roth (born 1961 in Pardes Hanna, Israel), was killed in action in 1982, during the first Lebanon war.
ID Number:
265381
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Roth, Cecilia (1956- ), actress, born Cecilia Rotenberg in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her father was an immigrant from the Ukraine while her mother was a singer born in Argentina. She appeared in many television series. In 1976 she moved to Spain with her father and appeared in a number of films made there. In 1997 and again in 1999 she was recipient of Spain's Goya Best Actress award. Roth's brother is a musician, a member of a popular band in Argentina.
Roth, Pedro (1938- ), art photographer, painter and cartoonist born in Budapest, Hungary, and who emigrated to Argentina in 1954. He graduated in filmmaking from the National University of La Plata and then studied art photography at the Metropolitan Museum in New York, USA. For over forty years Roth is an important player in many aspects of the culture of the City of Buenos Aires. He was the preferred photographer of the works of all major Argentinian artists, while at the same time he developed his own creative work through both painting and photography. He became known too as a cartoonist with a very distinctive style. Exhibitions of his work have been held throughout the Americas and Europe.

A creator and promoter of cultural ideas, Roth participated in a major Czech-Argentine cultural project which paid tribute to the pioneer of artificial intelligence, the Golem.

Lola Schmierer Roth (born Dorothea Schmierer) (1893-1981), painter, born in Galati, Romania. She studied at the Filipide high school for girls and during 1908-1911 she took drawing and painting classes with Antonio Zumino (1864-1927), an Italian academic painter who lived temporarily in Galați. In 1911 she travelled to Vienna and then to Berlin where she continued her art studies, followed by a sejour in Paris when she attended the Academie Julian art school. She returned to Berlin the same year and resided there until 1914 with her grandfather, the linguist Heimann Hariton Tiktin 1850-1936). Schmierer returned to Galati residing there until the end of WW1. During 1919 she traveled to Constantinople (Istanbul), Athens, Naples, and Switerland eventually settling in Berlin. Between 1930-1935 she lived in Paris. During the Holocaust years she was in Romania. Her husband, Wilhelm Roth, was arrested in June 1942 and held at Targu-Jiu camp and then placed under house arrest in Craiova after 1943. 

Schmierer Roth participated at the Romanian National Salon in 1933, 1935, 1936 with paintings, and in 1933-1935, 1946 and 1947 with graphics. In April 1935 she had her first solo exhibition at the gallery Prietenii Cărţii in Bucharest. After 1948 she started exhibiting again.

After WW2, she was marginalized by the communist regime and her activity was almost exclusively pedagogical. Schmierer Roth lived modestly as a drawing and art history teacher at several schools in Galati. Only during the 1970s she could return to the forefront of the city's cultural life. In 1972 she had a large solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Galati, and in 1973 she had a solo exhibition in Bucharest.

Schmierer Roth was awarded the Anastase Simu Prize for her work Autoportret at the National Salon Exhibition in Bucharest in 1933.

In 2003 her daughter and son-in-law donated 74 works by Schmierer Roth to the Museum of Visual Arts of Galati. 47 works from this donation were displayed in an exhibition at the Museum of Visual Arts of Galati in November 2014.

Roth

A village in the municipality of Weimar in the Marburg-Biedenkopf district in Gießen administrative region, Hesse, Germany.

First Jewish presence: 1611; peak Jewish population: 45 in 1900; Jewish population in 1933: 32 (six families)

On the basis of the prince-elector’s legislation on community affairs (dated December 30, 1823), the Jews of Roth, Fronhausen and Lohra were able to form a synagogue community in Roth. In 1861, the combined Jewish population of the three towns was 101. Fronhausen and Lohra left the synagogue community in 1880. In 1832, after the synagogue in Roth burned down, the community built a new house of worship. Records from 1883 mention that the new synagogue had its own seal— intertwined twigs—and two Torah scrolls. The synagogue was renovated on several occasions: in 1916, for example, the annex was rebuilt. The community also maintained a cemetery, a mikveh (located in the synagogue’s annex) and a school for religious studies, the last of which was often periodically shut down for lack of qualified teachers; after 1882, Jewish children attended the town’s public school. At the Jewish cemetery, the oldest gravestone is dated 1816; Jewish burials were conducted in Marburg from 1939 onwards.

From early 1936 until July 1938, the Jewish population dropped from 29 to 13. On November 8, 1938 (one day before Pogrom Night) the synagogue’s windows, interior and Judaica were destroyed. Later, on February 9, 1939, the synagogue was forcibly sold to a cabinet maker and a farmer, after which the site was used for storing lumber. The cemetery was closed in 1940; in 1941, a section of the burial ground was sold to neighboring residents, and in December 1942, a representative of the Jewish community in Frankfurt sold another section to residents of Roth. Seven Roth Jews immigrated to the United States or South Africa. Nineteen Neustadt Jews were brought to Roth in the spring of 1941, so that the Jewish population for October 28, 1941 was 28. Nine local Jews were deported to Theresienstadt Nazi concentration camp in 1941 and on September 9, 1942—all nine perished there. At least 29 Roth Jews were murdered in in the Shoah.

At the initiative of an American soldier, the cemetery was restored by 1949; a memorial plaque was later unveiled there. Memorial stones were also erected in honor of the Stern and Hoechster families. Roth’s synagogue, which was restored in 1990 and opened to the public in August 2008, bears a commemorative plaque.

----------------------------------------

This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.

Spisske Vlachy

A town in eastern Slovakia.

Spisske Vlachy lies north east of the city of Kosice. Till 1918 it was part of the Austro-Hungarian empire and afterwards in the Republic of Czechoslovakia.


History

Most of the population in the area (Szepes in Hungarian) were Germans who had objected to Jews residing in the towns. Until the middle of the 19th century, Jews lived only on the estates of the gentry. We do not know when the first Jews settled in Spisske Vlachy but the congregation was formally organized in 1852 and regulations of the burial society were changed in 1854. Most of the Jews were observant. They belonged to the rabbinate of Spisske Podhradie and built a synagogue, ritual bath and Jewish school. There were two Jewish cemeteries in the town. In 1921 Rabbi Baruch Feldbrand was rabbi of the community and Wilhelm Kraus president.

Most of the Jews in Spisske Vlachy engaged in commerce. During the period of the Czechoslovak Republic between the two world wars, Jews were active in political and Zionist circles. During that time, the Zionist movement Hashomer Hazair (young guards) organized camps in the nearby forests. Some of the young people in the town joined the movement, among them Egon Roth who later became one of its leaders in Slovakia.

In 1941 there were 140 Jews in Spisske Vlachy.


The Holocaust Period

The Czechoslovak Republic was dissolved a year before the outbreak of World War II as a result of the Munich Pact (September 1938). Slovakia proclaimed its autonomy in October 1938 and became an independent state and ally of Nazi Germany in March 1939. In 1940 the Germans blew up the synagogue and school.  The Fascist administration forced the expulsion of Jews from economic and social activities. Between March 26 and October 20, most of the Jews in Slovakia were deported to concentration camps in Poland. Jews who engaged in essential labor for the authorities or were married to non-Jews were exempt. In August 1944 a rebellion broke out in central Slovakia against the pro-German regime. Jews who were in work-camps or in hiding places fled to the forests and joined the rebellion. Egon Roth, one of the leaders of Hashomer Hazair and a commander of the Jewish partisans, fought the Nazis along with Jewish paratroopers from Eretz Israel. He was killed in October 1944. The Jews who were caught were sent to the camp at Sered and from there to the death camp in Auschwitz and other concentration camps in Germany and Theresienstadt. Most of them were killed.

Postwar

At the end of the war seven Jews of the town survived. All left the village. Only the cemeteries remained to commemorate the Jews who had once lived there. The old cemetery was very neglected and access to the graves difficult. Even in the new cemetery, situated on a hill two kilometers from the town, there were only a few monuments still standing. The prayer house also remains standing and  roofless.

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ROTH Origin of surname
ROTH

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from a physical characteristic or nickname. It is also an artificial color name.

Rot(h) means "red" in German. It was a nickname for a person with red hair or a red beard.In late 18th century many central European rulers began forcing the Jews to adopt fixed, hereditary family names. Many of the personal nicknames and titles then became family names.

Distinguished bearers of the Jewish family name Roth include the English historian Cecil (Bezalel) Roth (1899-1970), editor-in-chief of the Encyclopaedia Judaica; the 20th century Austrian-born American novelist Henry Roth, and the 20th century American novelist Philip Milton Roth. Lieutenant Danny Menachem Roth (born 1961 in Pardes Hanna, Israel), was killed in action in 1982, during the first Lebanon war.
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People

Spisske Vlachy
Roth, Hesse

Spisske Vlachy

A town in eastern Slovakia.

Spisske Vlachy lies north east of the city of Kosice. Till 1918 it was part of the Austro-Hungarian empire and afterwards in the Republic of Czechoslovakia.


History

Most of the population in the area (Szepes in Hungarian) were Germans who had objected to Jews residing in the towns. Until the middle of the 19th century, Jews lived only on the estates of the gentry. We do not know when the first Jews settled in Spisske Vlachy but the congregation was formally organized in 1852 and regulations of the burial society were changed in 1854. Most of the Jews were observant. They belonged to the rabbinate of Spisske Podhradie and built a synagogue, ritual bath and Jewish school. There were two Jewish cemeteries in the town. In 1921 Rabbi Baruch Feldbrand was rabbi of the community and Wilhelm Kraus president.

Most of the Jews in Spisske Vlachy engaged in commerce. During the period of the Czechoslovak Republic between the two world wars, Jews were active in political and Zionist circles. During that time, the Zionist movement Hashomer Hazair (young guards) organized camps in the nearby forests. Some of the young people in the town joined the movement, among them Egon Roth who later became one of its leaders in Slovakia.

In 1941 there were 140 Jews in Spisske Vlachy.


The Holocaust Period

The Czechoslovak Republic was dissolved a year before the outbreak of World War II as a result of the Munich Pact (September 1938). Slovakia proclaimed its autonomy in October 1938 and became an independent state and ally of Nazi Germany in March 1939. In 1940 the Germans blew up the synagogue and school.  The Fascist administration forced the expulsion of Jews from economic and social activities. Between March 26 and October 20, most of the Jews in Slovakia were deported to concentration camps in Poland. Jews who engaged in essential labor for the authorities or were married to non-Jews were exempt. In August 1944 a rebellion broke out in central Slovakia against the pro-German regime. Jews who were in work-camps or in hiding places fled to the forests and joined the rebellion. Egon Roth, one of the leaders of Hashomer Hazair and a commander of the Jewish partisans, fought the Nazis along with Jewish paratroopers from Eretz Israel. He was killed in October 1944. The Jews who were caught were sent to the camp at Sered and from there to the death camp in Auschwitz and other concentration camps in Germany and Theresienstadt. Most of them were killed.

Postwar

At the end of the war seven Jews of the town survived. All left the village. Only the cemeteries remained to commemorate the Jews who had once lived there. The old cemetery was very neglected and access to the graves difficult. Even in the new cemetery, situated on a hill two kilometers from the town, there were only a few monuments still standing. The prayer house also remains standing and  roofless.

Roth

A village in the municipality of Weimar in the Marburg-Biedenkopf district in Gießen administrative region, Hesse, Germany.

First Jewish presence: 1611; peak Jewish population: 45 in 1900; Jewish population in 1933: 32 (six families)

On the basis of the prince-elector’s legislation on community affairs (dated December 30, 1823), the Jews of Roth, Fronhausen and Lohra were able to form a synagogue community in Roth. In 1861, the combined Jewish population of the three towns was 101. Fronhausen and Lohra left the synagogue community in 1880. In 1832, after the synagogue in Roth burned down, the community built a new house of worship. Records from 1883 mention that the new synagogue had its own seal— intertwined twigs—and two Torah scrolls. The synagogue was renovated on several occasions: in 1916, for example, the annex was rebuilt. The community also maintained a cemetery, a mikveh (located in the synagogue’s annex) and a school for religious studies, the last of which was often periodically shut down for lack of qualified teachers; after 1882, Jewish children attended the town’s public school. At the Jewish cemetery, the oldest gravestone is dated 1816; Jewish burials were conducted in Marburg from 1939 onwards.

From early 1936 until July 1938, the Jewish population dropped from 29 to 13. On November 8, 1938 (one day before Pogrom Night) the synagogue’s windows, interior and Judaica were destroyed. Later, on February 9, 1939, the synagogue was forcibly sold to a cabinet maker and a farmer, after which the site was used for storing lumber. The cemetery was closed in 1940; in 1941, a section of the burial ground was sold to neighboring residents, and in December 1942, a representative of the Jewish community in Frankfurt sold another section to residents of Roth. Seven Roth Jews immigrated to the United States or South Africa. Nineteen Neustadt Jews were brought to Roth in the spring of 1941, so that the Jewish population for October 28, 1941 was 28. Nine local Jews were deported to Theresienstadt Nazi concentration camp in 1941 and on September 9, 1942—all nine perished there. At least 29 Roth Jews were murdered in in the Shoah.

At the initiative of an American soldier, the cemetery was restored by 1949; a memorial plaque was later unveiled there. Memorial stones were also erected in honor of the Stern and Hoechster families. Roth’s synagogue, which was restored in 1990 and opened to the public in August 2008, bears a commemorative plaque.

----------------------------------------

This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.

Lola Schmierer Roth
Roth, Pedro
Roth, Cecilia

Lola Schmierer Roth (born Dorothea Schmierer) (1893-1981), painter, born in Galati, Romania. She studied at the Filipide high school for girls and during 1908-1911 she took drawing and painting classes with Antonio Zumino (1864-1927), an Italian academic painter who lived temporarily in Galați. In 1911 she travelled to Vienna and then to Berlin where she continued her art studies, followed by a sejour in Paris when she attended the Academie Julian art school. She returned to Berlin the same year and resided there until 1914 with her grandfather, the linguist Heimann Hariton Tiktin 1850-1936). Schmierer returned to Galati residing there until the end of WW1. During 1919 she traveled to Constantinople (Istanbul), Athens, Naples, and Switerland eventually settling in Berlin. Between 1930-1935 she lived in Paris. During the Holocaust years she was in Romania. Her husband, Wilhelm Roth, was arrested in June 1942 and held at Targu-Jiu camp and then placed under house arrest in Craiova after 1943. 

Schmierer Roth participated at the Romanian National Salon in 1933, 1935, 1936 with paintings, and in 1933-1935, 1946 and 1947 with graphics. In April 1935 she had her first solo exhibition at the gallery Prietenii Cărţii in Bucharest. After 1948 she started exhibiting again.

After WW2, she was marginalized by the communist regime and her activity was almost exclusively pedagogical. Schmierer Roth lived modestly as a drawing and art history teacher at several schools in Galati. Only during the 1970s she could return to the forefront of the city's cultural life. In 1972 she had a large solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Galati, and in 1973 she had a solo exhibition in Bucharest.

Schmierer Roth was awarded the Anastase Simu Prize for her work Autoportret at the National Salon Exhibition in Bucharest in 1933.

In 2003 her daughter and son-in-law donated 74 works by Schmierer Roth to the Museum of Visual Arts of Galati. 47 works from this donation were displayed in an exhibition at the Museum of Visual Arts of Galati in November 2014.

Roth, Pedro (1938- ), art photographer, painter and cartoonist born in Budapest, Hungary, and who emigrated to Argentina in 1954. He graduated in filmmaking from the National University of La Plata and then studied art photography at the Metropolitan Museum in New York, USA. For over forty years Roth is an important player in many aspects of the culture of the City of Buenos Aires. He was the preferred photographer of the works of all major Argentinian artists, while at the same time he developed his own creative work through both painting and photography. He became known too as a cartoonist with a very distinctive style. Exhibitions of his work have been held throughout the Americas and Europe.

A creator and promoter of cultural ideas, Roth participated in a major Czech-Argentine cultural project which paid tribute to the pioneer of artificial intelligence, the Golem.
Roth, Cecilia (1956- ), actress, born Cecilia Rotenberg in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her father was an immigrant from the Ukraine while her mother was a singer born in Argentina. She appeared in many television series. In 1976 she moved to Spain with her father and appeared in a number of films made there. In 1997 and again in 1999 she was recipient of Spain's Goya Best Actress award. Roth's brother is a musician, a member of a popular band in Argentina.