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The Jewish Community of Przeworsk

Przeworsk

A town in Rzeszow province, south-eastern Poland.

Przeworsk was granted the status of town in the 14th century. The first Jews settled there in the middle of the 16th century, and by early 17th century there were some 30 Jewish families living in the town.

The town was overrun by the Turks in 1498, it endured the invasion of the Swedes in 1656 during the reign of John Casimir, and recovered after 1677 when the Polish "Sejm" decided to lend its assistance in its development. From then on it enjoyed economic prosperity.

In 1865 there were 1,500 Jews living in Przeworsk, out of a total population of 4,000. In 1921 they numbered 1,457, out of a total population of 3,371.

Moses Sofer (died 1805) was rabbi of the community. The last rabbi was Eliyahu Frenkel Teomim (rabbi since 1924), who perished in the Holocaust.

After World War I the library in Przeworsk played a prominent role in the cultural life of the Jewish population. After the great fire of 1930 many of the town's Jews were left homeless and dependent on support from charitable institutions. With the increase of Anti-Semitism during the 1930's the community organized a protest campaign and a self-defense group.
Elections to the community were held in 1934.

Before World War II there were 1,500 Jews living in Przeworsk.

The Holocaust Period

On "Rosh Ha-Shana" eve 5700 (September 14, 1939) the German army entered Przeworsk. The Germans burnt down the great synagogue and abused and beat the rabbi and other Jews. The forced them to give money and valuables and after two weeks expelled them from the town, including Jews from the surrounding villages, a total of 2,000 Jews, to the Soviet area across the San river. Only 25 Jews remained in the town by the end of September 1939. They were sent to the death camp at Belzec in August 1942.

Most of the Jews who survived the Holocaust were among the deportees to the Soviet Union.

Place Type:
Town
ID Number:
252265
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
The Jewish Community of Przeworsk

Przeworsk

A town in Rzeszow province, south-eastern Poland.

Przeworsk was granted the status of town in the 14th century. The first Jews settled there in the middle of the 16th century, and by early 17th century there were some 30 Jewish families living in the town.

The town was overrun by the Turks in 1498, it endured the invasion of the Swedes in 1656 during the reign of John Casimir, and recovered after 1677 when the Polish "Sejm" decided to lend its assistance in its development. From then on it enjoyed economic prosperity.

In 1865 there were 1,500 Jews living in Przeworsk, out of a total population of 4,000. In 1921 they numbered 1,457, out of a total population of 3,371.

Moses Sofer (died 1805) was rabbi of the community. The last rabbi was Eliyahu Frenkel Teomim (rabbi since 1924), who perished in the Holocaust.

After World War I the library in Przeworsk played a prominent role in the cultural life of the Jewish population. After the great fire of 1930 many of the town's Jews were left homeless and dependent on support from charitable institutions. With the increase of Anti-Semitism during the 1930's the community organized a protest campaign and a self-defense group.
Elections to the community were held in 1934.

Before World War II there were 1,500 Jews living in Przeworsk.

The Holocaust Period

On "Rosh Ha-Shana" eve 5700 (September 14, 1939) the German army entered Przeworsk. The Germans burnt down the great synagogue and abused and beat the rabbi and other Jews. The forced them to give money and valuables and after two weeks expelled them from the town, including Jews from the surrounding villages, a total of 2,000 Jews, to the Soviet area across the San river. Only 25 Jews remained in the town by the end of September 1939. They were sent to the death camp at Belzec in August 1942.

Most of the Jews who survived the Holocaust were among the deportees to the Soviet Union.

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People