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LEVI Origin of surname

LEVI, LEVY

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name usually derives from lineage (priestly, Levite, convert). Levy is also a male Hebrew biblical personal name. The surname is therefore a patronymic, derived from a male ancestor's personal name.

The Levites are descendants of Levi, the third son of Jacob and Leah. Distinguished bearers of the family name Levy include: Nathan Levy, of Austrian nationality, was a merchant in Tunis in the 19th century. His son Juda Levy was chief rabbi of the Grana Jewish community (Jews from Livorno, Italy, who settled in Tunis since the 16th century) from 1839 until his death in 1848; Simha Levy from Tunis (1868-1923) was a printer and publisher, one of the founders of Jewish press and literature in Arabic in Tunis, founder of newspapers such as 'Al-Funugraf' (1907), as well as a composer of traditional Jewish songs; his son Victor Levy was a known typographer and author, whose pseudonym was Vehel, and who published a cookery book called 'La Cuisine Tunisienne' that included many Jewish recipes. The grandson Raphael Levy was director of Alliance Israelite Universelle schools (1943-1953), and an author under the pseudonym of Ryvel, of short stories based on the life and beliefs of Tunisian Jews; Moses Levy (born Tunis 1885-1968) was a painter whose paintings were inspired by the landscapes of Tunisia and by the Jewish life there. Other distinguished bearers of the Jewish family name Levi include the German mathematician Raphael Levi (1685-1779), and the 20th century Italian physician, painter and writer Carlo Levi; the Dutch-born American merchant who founded the city of Aaronsburgh and financed George Washington's army, Aaron Levy (1742-1815); the German banker Wilhelm Von Levy (1861-1947) and the 20th century German embryologist Fritz Levy.
ID Number:
233038
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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LEVI Origin of surname
LEVI, LEVY

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name usually derives from lineage (priestly, Levite, convert). Levy is also a male Hebrew biblical personal name. The surname is therefore a patronymic, derived from a male ancestor's personal name.

The Levites are descendants of Levi, the third son of Jacob and Leah. Distinguished bearers of the family name Levy include: Nathan Levy, of Austrian nationality, was a merchant in Tunis in the 19th century. His son Juda Levy was chief rabbi of the Grana Jewish community (Jews from Livorno, Italy, who settled in Tunis since the 16th century) from 1839 until his death in 1848; Simha Levy from Tunis (1868-1923) was a printer and publisher, one of the founders of Jewish press and literature in Arabic in Tunis, founder of newspapers such as 'Al-Funugraf' (1907), as well as a composer of traditional Jewish songs; his son Victor Levy was a known typographer and author, whose pseudonym was Vehel, and who published a cookery book called 'La Cuisine Tunisienne' that included many Jewish recipes. The grandson Raphael Levy was director of Alliance Israelite Universelle schools (1943-1953), and an author under the pseudonym of Ryvel, of short stories based on the life and beliefs of Tunisian Jews; Moses Levy (born Tunis 1885-1968) was a painter whose paintings were inspired by the landscapes of Tunisia and by the Jewish life there. Other distinguished bearers of the Jewish family name Levi include the German mathematician Raphael Levi (1685-1779), and the 20th century Italian physician, painter and writer Carlo Levi; the Dutch-born American merchant who founded the city of Aaronsburgh and financed George Washington's army, Aaron Levy (1742-1815); the German banker Wilhelm Von Levy (1861-1947) and the 20th century German embryologist Fritz Levy.
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People