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Alexander and Tamara Tiomkin, Wedding of Andy and Sandy, Long Island, USA, 1980s

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Alexander and Tamara Tiomkin (left), David Stahl (right) at the wedding of Andy and Sandy (center), Long Island, USA, 1980s

The Oster Visual Documentation Center, ANU – Museum of the Jewish People, courtesy of Marina Davidovski (Tiomkin)

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22387235
Image Purchase: For more details about image purchasing Click here, make sure you have the photo ID number (as appear above)
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TIOMKIN

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a matronymic (derived from a female ancestor's personal name).

This Jewish family name probably derives from Tamar which means "date palm" in Hebrew. Tamar was the name of various biblical women. One was the daughter in law of Judah and mother of the twins, Perez and Zerah (Genesis 38.1).

Several Jewish family names are based on this Hebrew personal name, which was sometimes abbreviated to Teme and changed to Toemke, or expanded to Tumarkin, particularly in Eastern Europe. Tiomkin could be based on the personal name Toemke, indicating "son/descendant of Toemke" in the Slavic languages. A distinguished bearer of this name was the Russian Zionist leader, Vladimir (Ze'ev) Tiomkin, sometimes spelled Temkin, (1861-1927), after whom the settlement Ramat Tiomkin, near Netanya, is named.
DAVIDOVSKI

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a patronymic surname based on a male ancestor's personal name, in this case of biblical origin.

Davidovski is a Slavic form of the name meaning "the son of David". The Russian syllable "-ov" and the Slavic "-ski" are equivalents of the Hebrew Ben ("son"). David, which means "the beloved" in Hebrew, was the youngest son of Jesse the Ephratite of Bethlehem, of the house of Judah, a descendant of Boaz and Ruth the Moabitess. The first king of united Israel and Judah, David reigned for more than 40 years, from about 1010 to 970 BCE. His story is told in 1 Samuel 16, 1 Kings 2, and 1 Chronicles 10-29. In the Bible, the name David is used only for this great king; it does not appear at all in the talmudic era. This is in keeping with ancient tradition, according to which first names were given names in the full sense of the term, being the exclusive property of the person on whom they had been conferred. Since the early Middle Ages, David has been one of the most popular first names among Jews. When they adopted, or were forced to take, fixed hereditary family names, David and its numerous variants became favorites with many Sephardim as well as Ashkenazim. The most popular Sephardi names derived from David, widespread throughout the Mediterranean region, are Ben David, Avendavit, Evendavit, Davi, Abendavi, Evendavit, Abendavi, Bar David and Abu David. Ashkenazi variants include Davidi, Davidheimann, Davidis, Davides, Davidso(h)n, Davidsen, Davied, Davidt, Davisius, Davidavis, Davis, Daviel and Davidowitz. Derivatives produced by the emphasis on the second syllable and the loss of the first, comprise Veit, Beit, Feitl, Weid, Wittekind, Teweles, Tewel, and Wedel(l). Slavic forms include Davidoff and Davidov, Davidovich, Davidowitz, Davydov, Dabo, Dabko, and Dakbowitz. Davideit and Davidat are Lithuanian variants.
DAVIDOVSKY

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a patronymic surname based on a male ancestor's personal name, in this case of biblical origin.

Davidovsky, in which the Russian ending "-ovsky" means "of/from" and stands for "son of", is a variant of David. David, which means "the beloved" in Hebrew, was the youngest son of Jesse the Ephratite of Bethlehem, of the house of Judah, a descendant of Boaz and Ruth the Moabitess. The first king of united Israel and Judah, David reigned for more than 40 years, from about 1010 to 970 BCE. His story is told in 1 Samuel 16, 1 Kings 2, and 1 Chronicles 10-29. In the Bible, the name David is used only for this great king; it does not appear at all in the talmudic era. This is in keeping with ancient tradition, according to which first names were given names in the full sense of the term, being the exclusive property of the person on whom they had been conferred. Since the early Middle Ages, David has been one of the most popular first names among Jews. When they adopted, or were forced to take, fixed hereditary family names, David and its numerous variants became favorites with many Sephardim as well as Ashkenazim. The most popular Sephardi names derived from David, widespread throughout the Mediterranean region, are Ben David, Avendavit, Evendavit, Davi, Abendavi, Evendavit, Abendavi, Bar David and Abu David. Ashkenazi variants include Davidi, Davidheimann, Davidis, Davides, Davidso(h)n, Davidsen, Davied, Davidt, Davisius, Davidavis, Davis, Daviel and Davidowitz. Derivatives produced by the emphasis on the second syllable and the loss of the first, comprise Veit, Beit, Feitl, Weid, Wittekind, Teweles, Tewel, and Wedel(l). Slavic forms include Davidoff and Davidov, Davidovich, Davidowitz, Davydov, Dabo, Dabko, and Dakbowitz. Davideit and Davidat are Lithuanian variants. In the 20th century Davidovsky is documented as a Jewish family name during World War II with Isaak Davidovsky, who was deported from France to a German concentration camp in 1942.
SZTAL

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from a physical or personal characteristic or nickname.

Sztal is a Polish/Yiddish form of Stahl, the German for "steel". The surname Sztal can be linked to a nickname referring to the "hard/steely" body or character of a person. It can also be associated with occupations such as the manufacture and sale of steel products. The Jewish family name Stahl is documented with the German philosopher, Friedrich Julius Stahl (1802-1861). In the 20th century Sztal is recorded as a Jewish surname with Benjamin Sztal of the Polish People's Army who was killed in action fighting the Germans during World War II.
STAHL

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from a physical or personal characteristic or nickname. The name could also derive from an occupation (also connected with raw material, finished product or implements associated with that trade).

Stahl means "steel" in German. It was a nickname referring either to the "hard/steely" body or character of a person, or to occupations such as the manufacture and sale of steel products.

Distinguished bearers of the Jewish family name Stahl include the German philosopher, Friedrich Julius Stahl (1802-1861), the 20th century South African-born British educator and author, Ernest Ludwig Stahl, and the 20th century Israeli researcher, Abraham Stahl.
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Alexander and Tamara Tiomkin, Wedding of Andy and Sandy, Long Island, USA, 1980s

Alexander and Tamara Tiomkin (left), David Stahl (right) at the wedding of Andy and Sandy (center), Long Island, USA, 1980s

The Oster Visual Documentation Center, ANU – Museum of the Jewish People, courtesy of Marina Davidovski (Tiomkin)

Image Purchase: For more details about image purchasing Click here, make sure you have the photo ID number (as appear above)
TIOMKIN
TIOMKIN

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a matronymic (derived from a female ancestor's personal name).

This Jewish family name probably derives from Tamar which means "date palm" in Hebrew. Tamar was the name of various biblical women. One was the daughter in law of Judah and mother of the twins, Perez and Zerah (Genesis 38.1).

Several Jewish family names are based on this Hebrew personal name, which was sometimes abbreviated to Teme and changed to Toemke, or expanded to Tumarkin, particularly in Eastern Europe. Tiomkin could be based on the personal name Toemke, indicating "son/descendant of Toemke" in the Slavic languages. A distinguished bearer of this name was the Russian Zionist leader, Vladimir (Ze'ev) Tiomkin, sometimes spelled Temkin, (1861-1927), after whom the settlement Ramat Tiomkin, near Netanya, is named.
DAVIDOVSKI
DAVIDOVSKI

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a patronymic surname based on a male ancestor's personal name, in this case of biblical origin.

Davidovski is a Slavic form of the name meaning "the son of David". The Russian syllable "-ov" and the Slavic "-ski" are equivalents of the Hebrew Ben ("son"). David, which means "the beloved" in Hebrew, was the youngest son of Jesse the Ephratite of Bethlehem, of the house of Judah, a descendant of Boaz and Ruth the Moabitess. The first king of united Israel and Judah, David reigned for more than 40 years, from about 1010 to 970 BCE. His story is told in 1 Samuel 16, 1 Kings 2, and 1 Chronicles 10-29. In the Bible, the name David is used only for this great king; it does not appear at all in the talmudic era. This is in keeping with ancient tradition, according to which first names were given names in the full sense of the term, being the exclusive property of the person on whom they had been conferred. Since the early Middle Ages, David has been one of the most popular first names among Jews. When they adopted, or were forced to take, fixed hereditary family names, David and its numerous variants became favorites with many Sephardim as well as Ashkenazim. The most popular Sephardi names derived from David, widespread throughout the Mediterranean region, are Ben David, Avendavit, Evendavit, Davi, Abendavi, Evendavit, Abendavi, Bar David and Abu David. Ashkenazi variants include Davidi, Davidheimann, Davidis, Davides, Davidso(h)n, Davidsen, Davied, Davidt, Davisius, Davidavis, Davis, Daviel and Davidowitz. Derivatives produced by the emphasis on the second syllable and the loss of the first, comprise Veit, Beit, Feitl, Weid, Wittekind, Teweles, Tewel, and Wedel(l). Slavic forms include Davidoff and Davidov, Davidovich, Davidowitz, Davydov, Dabo, Dabko, and Dakbowitz. Davideit and Davidat are Lithuanian variants.
DAVIDOVSKY
DAVIDOVSKY

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a patronymic surname based on a male ancestor's personal name, in this case of biblical origin.

Davidovsky, in which the Russian ending "-ovsky" means "of/from" and stands for "son of", is a variant of David. David, which means "the beloved" in Hebrew, was the youngest son of Jesse the Ephratite of Bethlehem, of the house of Judah, a descendant of Boaz and Ruth the Moabitess. The first king of united Israel and Judah, David reigned for more than 40 years, from about 1010 to 970 BCE. His story is told in 1 Samuel 16, 1 Kings 2, and 1 Chronicles 10-29. In the Bible, the name David is used only for this great king; it does not appear at all in the talmudic era. This is in keeping with ancient tradition, according to which first names were given names in the full sense of the term, being the exclusive property of the person on whom they had been conferred. Since the early Middle Ages, David has been one of the most popular first names among Jews. When they adopted, or were forced to take, fixed hereditary family names, David and its numerous variants became favorites with many Sephardim as well as Ashkenazim. The most popular Sephardi names derived from David, widespread throughout the Mediterranean region, are Ben David, Avendavit, Evendavit, Davi, Abendavi, Evendavit, Abendavi, Bar David and Abu David. Ashkenazi variants include Davidi, Davidheimann, Davidis, Davides, Davidso(h)n, Davidsen, Davied, Davidt, Davisius, Davidavis, Davis, Daviel and Davidowitz. Derivatives produced by the emphasis on the second syllable and the loss of the first, comprise Veit, Beit, Feitl, Weid, Wittekind, Teweles, Tewel, and Wedel(l). Slavic forms include Davidoff and Davidov, Davidovich, Davidowitz, Davydov, Dabo, Dabko, and Dakbowitz. Davideit and Davidat are Lithuanian variants. In the 20th century Davidovsky is documented as a Jewish family name during World War II with Isaak Davidovsky, who was deported from France to a German concentration camp in 1942.
SZTAL
SZTAL

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from a physical or personal characteristic or nickname.

Sztal is a Polish/Yiddish form of Stahl, the German for "steel". The surname Sztal can be linked to a nickname referring to the "hard/steely" body or character of a person. It can also be associated with occupations such as the manufacture and sale of steel products. The Jewish family name Stahl is documented with the German philosopher, Friedrich Julius Stahl (1802-1861). In the 20th century Sztal is recorded as a Jewish surname with Benjamin Sztal of the Polish People's Army who was killed in action fighting the Germans during World War II.
STAHL
STAHL

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from a physical or personal characteristic or nickname. The name could also derive from an occupation (also connected with raw material, finished product or implements associated with that trade).

Stahl means "steel" in German. It was a nickname referring either to the "hard/steely" body or character of a person, or to occupations such as the manufacture and sale of steel products.

Distinguished bearers of the Jewish family name Stahl include the German philosopher, Friedrich Julius Stahl (1802-1861), the 20th century South African-born British educator and author, Ernest Ludwig Stahl, and the 20th century Israeli researcher, Abraham Stahl.