Search
Print
Share
Your Selected Item:
Personality
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions

Eliahu Akiva Rabinowich

Eliahu Akiva Rabinowich (1861-1917) Rabbi.

Born in Silale, he studied in various yeshivot and after an unsuccessful attempt at commerce succeeded his father as rabbi of Pyantiza in 1888. From 1893 he was rabbi of Poltava. Under the influence of Shmuel Mohilewer he became a supporter of Zionism, attending the first Russian Zionist Conference and the second Zionist Congress, both in 1898. However, he felt that the Zionist movement should concentrate on political activities and not become involved in culture and education. In disillusionment, he attacked Zionism and became a leader in a bitter controversy with the secular Zionists. He edited the anti-Zionist journals involved in this controversy. In 1912 Rabinowich participated in the founding conference of Agudat Israel. He wrote a commentary on the book of Ruth and halakhic responsa

Date of birth:
1861
Date of death:
1917
Place of birth:
Silale
Personality type:
Rabbis
ID Number:
216996
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Nearby places:
Related items:
RABINOVICH

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from Jewish communal functionaries or titles.

Rabinovich is a Slavic form of Rabbi in which the Russian suffix "-ovich" means "of/from" or "son of".

Similar family names indicating rabbinic descent are Marbiz Torah, Hakham ("wise one"), Hacham ("wise one"), Mori ("my teacher"), 'Dayan' ("religious judge"), as well as Rabbi, Rebbi and Ribbi.

A great number of Jewish family names can be traced to the title of Rabbi. One of them is Ravina, borne by two Amoraim who helped to complete the Babylonian Talmud.

Abnarrabi is documented in 1206, Elrabi in 1282, Rabi in 1283 with Samuel Rabi of Tortosa (Spain), Rabbi in the 13th century, Raby in 1462, Rabj in 1465, Adarabbi and Adarby in the 16th century, and Ribbi in 1782.

Distinguished bearers of the Slavic Jewish family name Rabinovich include the author, Osip Aronovich Rabinovich (1817-1869) who founded and edited 'Razsvet', the first Jewish journal in Russian; the 20th century Russian-born educator, Isaiah Rabinovich; and the 20th century Latvian-born Israeli newspaper executive, Gutman Rabinovich.

Silale

Šilalė ; Shilel in Jewish sources

A town in the district of Taurage, western Lithuania.

Jews settled in Silale in the 18th century. In the middle of the 19th century their number came to 747, and at the close of the century there were 786 Jews living in Silale, comprising more than half of the town's inhabitants.

The town had an ancient synagogue. The building was destroyed in 1906 when a fire broke out in the town. There was also a study house and a shtiebel (a room set aside for prayer and learning). Between the two world wars, when Lithuania was independent, a Yavneh school was opened, where several dozens pupils studied. The last rabbi to officiate in the town was Rabbi Calev Meyer Ziv, author of Gulat Calev.

The Jews of Silale earned their living from trade with the farmers of the vicinity. There was a local weekly market day and eight annual fairs. Several Jews engaged in foreign trading, mainly with Germany, and some were craftsmen.

Relations between the Jews of Silale and the local population were good. Zionist activity flourished, especially in the years between the two world wars, centering in the society Agudat Zion. Through it the Zionist idea was spread, Hebrew was studied and contributions were collected for Eretz Israel funds. They also operated a library and a drama circle.

Only a small number of Jews from Silale emigrated to Eretz Israel, but many of them settled in the United States and in South Africa. In 1921 there were 850 Jews in Silale; from then on their numbers decreased.

On the eve of World War II 350 Jews were living in Silale.


The Holocaust Period

After the outbreak of World War II (September 1, 1939) and the occupation of Poland by the Germans, Lithuania came under Soviet rule (June 22, 1941). Backed by the Germans, the local Lithuanians took over the town. Jewish women, whose husbands had been active in the days of the Soviet rule, were arrested and after being brutally beaten were murdered in the Jewish cemetery. Two weeks later, the Lithuanians arrested more than a hundred Jewish men and youths, imprisoned them in the synagogue, and tossed hand grenades into the building. Those who were not killed in the synagogue were later led to the cemetery and murdered there. At the beginning of autumn, the Jews who still remained in the town, mainly women and small children, were murdered in pits dug in advance in a forest near the town of Tubinai.


After the war, a monument was set in memory of the Soviet citizens who were put to death by the German Fascists.

Poltava

The administrative center of the Poltava Oblast, Ukraine

Jews began to settle in Poltava towards the end of the 18th century. In 1801 there were 18 Jewish merchants in Poltava and 292 Jews who were classified as townsmen (about one-fifth of the total number of inhabitants). The community in Poltava and its surrounding neighborhoods numbered 2,073 in 1847. By the 1870s that number had doubled, and in 1897 the Jewish population reached 11,046 (20.5% of the total population), of whom a considerable number were originally from Lithuania and Belarus. The Poltava community became one of the best-organized and most progressive in Russia.

The community had ten synagogues. By the end of the 19th century the Talmud Torah had been converted into a modern elementary school and was attended by 300 children who studied both religious and general subjects. Its teaching staff included Alexander Siskind Rabinovitz and M. Haezrachi. There were also vocational schools for girls supported by the Jewish Colonization Association, a yeshiva, and 20 cheders. The community's hospital and clinic provided free services, and there was an old age home and a loan bank. The Jewish library consisted of 8,000 volumes. During the 1920s and 1930s there were also two Yiddish schools.

The influx of the Russian intelligentsia, led by the author Vladimir Korolenko, prevented the outbreak of pogroms in Poltava during the revolutions in Russia in 1905 and 1917.

There was a strong Zionist movement in Poltava, which became one of the foremost centers of the Po'alei Zion movement in Russia. Several founders of the party were born in Poltava and became very active there, including Itzhak Ben-Zvi (Shimshelevich) and Jacob (Vitkin) Zerubavel. The ideological organ of the party, Yevreyskaya Rabochaya Khronika, founded in 1906, was published in Poltava.

The rabbi of Poltava from 1893 until 1917 was Eliyahu Akiva Rabinowitz. He was an ultra-Orthodox and a strong opponent of the Zionists. He published the religious monthly HaPeles (1903-1906) and the weekly HaModia in Poltava (HaModia continues to be published in ultra-Orthodox communities as of 2015). Another notable figure born in Poltava was the historian Elias Tcherikower. Poltava remained a center for printing Jewish religious books (particularly siddurim and calendars) until 1927.

The Jewish population numbered 18,476 (20.1% of the total) in 1926. Of the Jews in the labor force, 2,415 were white collar workers, 1,862 were craftsmen, and 1,676 were unskilled laborers. Approximately 80% of the members of the artisan union were Jewish.

When the Germans entered the city in 1941, those Jews who did not succeed in escaping were killed. On September 25th 5,000 Jews were killed, and 3,000 more were executed on November 23rd.

In the late 1960s the Jewish population was estimated at 5,000. There was no synagogue; the last synagogue was forcibly closed in 1959 by a militia that broke in, confiscated all of the religious articles, dispersed the congregation, and prohibited any further gatherings. Subsequently, the Jews prayed in private. There is a Jewish cemetery in Poltava, along with two mass graves of Jews who were killed by the Nazis; 13,000 bodies are buried in one, 7,000 in the other. The monuments at the location do not specify that all of the victims were Jews.
our Open Databases
Jewish Genealogy
Family Names
Jewish Communities
Visual Documentation
Jewish Music Center
Personality
אA
אA
אA
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
Eliahu Akiva Rabinowich

Eliahu Akiva Rabinowich (1861-1917) Rabbi.

Born in Silale, he studied in various yeshivot and after an unsuccessful attempt at commerce succeeded his father as rabbi of Pyantiza in 1888. From 1893 he was rabbi of Poltava. Under the influence of Shmuel Mohilewer he became a supporter of Zionism, attending the first Russian Zionist Conference and the second Zionist Congress, both in 1898. However, he felt that the Zionist movement should concentrate on political activities and not become involved in culture and education. In disillusionment, he attacked Zionism and became a leader in a bitter controversy with the secular Zionists. He edited the anti-Zionist journals involved in this controversy. In 1912 Rabinowich participated in the founding conference of Agudat Israel. He wrote a commentary on the book of Ruth and halakhic responsa

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
RABINOVICH
RABINOVICH

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from Jewish communal functionaries or titles.

Rabinovich is a Slavic form of Rabbi in which the Russian suffix "-ovich" means "of/from" or "son of".

Similar family names indicating rabbinic descent are Marbiz Torah, Hakham ("wise one"), Hacham ("wise one"), Mori ("my teacher"), 'Dayan' ("religious judge"), as well as Rabbi, Rebbi and Ribbi.

A great number of Jewish family names can be traced to the title of Rabbi. One of them is Ravina, borne by two Amoraim who helped to complete the Babylonian Talmud.

Abnarrabi is documented in 1206, Elrabi in 1282, Rabi in 1283 with Samuel Rabi of Tortosa (Spain), Rabbi in the 13th century, Raby in 1462, Rabj in 1465, Adarabbi and Adarby in the 16th century, and Ribbi in 1782.

Distinguished bearers of the Slavic Jewish family name Rabinovich include the author, Osip Aronovich Rabinovich (1817-1869) who founded and edited 'Razsvet', the first Jewish journal in Russian; the 20th century Russian-born educator, Isaiah Rabinovich; and the 20th century Latvian-born Israeli newspaper executive, Gutman Rabinovich.

Silale

Silale

Šilalė ; Shilel in Jewish sources

A town in the district of Taurage, western Lithuania.

Jews settled in Silale in the 18th century. In the middle of the 19th century their number came to 747, and at the close of the century there were 786 Jews living in Silale, comprising more than half of the town's inhabitants.

The town had an ancient synagogue. The building was destroyed in 1906 when a fire broke out in the town. There was also a study house and a shtiebel (a room set aside for prayer and learning). Between the two world wars, when Lithuania was independent, a Yavneh school was opened, where several dozens pupils studied. The last rabbi to officiate in the town was Rabbi Calev Meyer Ziv, author of Gulat Calev.

The Jews of Silale earned their living from trade with the farmers of the vicinity. There was a local weekly market day and eight annual fairs. Several Jews engaged in foreign trading, mainly with Germany, and some were craftsmen.

Relations between the Jews of Silale and the local population were good. Zionist activity flourished, especially in the years between the two world wars, centering in the society Agudat Zion. Through it the Zionist idea was spread, Hebrew was studied and contributions were collected for Eretz Israel funds. They also operated a library and a drama circle.

Only a small number of Jews from Silale emigrated to Eretz Israel, but many of them settled in the United States and in South Africa. In 1921 there were 850 Jews in Silale; from then on their numbers decreased.

On the eve of World War II 350 Jews were living in Silale.


The Holocaust Period

After the outbreak of World War II (September 1, 1939) and the occupation of Poland by the Germans, Lithuania came under Soviet rule (June 22, 1941). Backed by the Germans, the local Lithuanians took over the town. Jewish women, whose husbands had been active in the days of the Soviet rule, were arrested and after being brutally beaten were murdered in the Jewish cemetery. Two weeks later, the Lithuanians arrested more than a hundred Jewish men and youths, imprisoned them in the synagogue, and tossed hand grenades into the building. Those who were not killed in the synagogue were later led to the cemetery and murdered there. At the beginning of autumn, the Jews who still remained in the town, mainly women and small children, were murdered in pits dug in advance in a forest near the town of Tubinai.


After the war, a monument was set in memory of the Soviet citizens who were put to death by the German Fascists.

Poltava
Poltava

The administrative center of the Poltava Oblast, Ukraine

Jews began to settle in Poltava towards the end of the 18th century. In 1801 there were 18 Jewish merchants in Poltava and 292 Jews who were classified as townsmen (about one-fifth of the total number of inhabitants). The community in Poltava and its surrounding neighborhoods numbered 2,073 in 1847. By the 1870s that number had doubled, and in 1897 the Jewish population reached 11,046 (20.5% of the total population), of whom a considerable number were originally from Lithuania and Belarus. The Poltava community became one of the best-organized and most progressive in Russia.

The community had ten synagogues. By the end of the 19th century the Talmud Torah had been converted into a modern elementary school and was attended by 300 children who studied both religious and general subjects. Its teaching staff included Alexander Siskind Rabinovitz and M. Haezrachi. There were also vocational schools for girls supported by the Jewish Colonization Association, a yeshiva, and 20 cheders. The community's hospital and clinic provided free services, and there was an old age home and a loan bank. The Jewish library consisted of 8,000 volumes. During the 1920s and 1930s there were also two Yiddish schools.

The influx of the Russian intelligentsia, led by the author Vladimir Korolenko, prevented the outbreak of pogroms in Poltava during the revolutions in Russia in 1905 and 1917.

There was a strong Zionist movement in Poltava, which became one of the foremost centers of the Po'alei Zion movement in Russia. Several founders of the party were born in Poltava and became very active there, including Itzhak Ben-Zvi (Shimshelevich) and Jacob (Vitkin) Zerubavel. The ideological organ of the party, Yevreyskaya Rabochaya Khronika, founded in 1906, was published in Poltava.

The rabbi of Poltava from 1893 until 1917 was Eliyahu Akiva Rabinowitz. He was an ultra-Orthodox and a strong opponent of the Zionists. He published the religious monthly HaPeles (1903-1906) and the weekly HaModia in Poltava (HaModia continues to be published in ultra-Orthodox communities as of 2015). Another notable figure born in Poltava was the historian Elias Tcherikower. Poltava remained a center for printing Jewish religious books (particularly siddurim and calendars) until 1927.

The Jewish population numbered 18,476 (20.1% of the total) in 1926. Of the Jews in the labor force, 2,415 were white collar workers, 1,862 were craftsmen, and 1,676 were unskilled laborers. Approximately 80% of the members of the artisan union were Jewish.

When the Germans entered the city in 1941, those Jews who did not succeed in escaping were killed. On September 25th 5,000 Jews were killed, and 3,000 more were executed on November 23rd.

In the late 1960s the Jewish population was estimated at 5,000. There was no synagogue; the last synagogue was forcibly closed in 1959 by a militia that broke in, confiscated all of the religious articles, dispersed the congregation, and prohibited any further gatherings. Subsequently, the Jews prayed in private. There is a Jewish cemetery in Poltava, along with two mass graves of Jews who were killed by the Nazis; 13,000 bodies are buried in one, 7,000 in the other. The monuments at the location do not specify that all of the victims were Jews.