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The Jewish Community of Imling

Imling

A commune in the Moselle department in the historical region of Lorraine, France.

It seems that Jews lived in Imling during medieval times. The beginnings of the modern community date from the end of the 17th century, when two Jews, Michel Levy, a horse dealer, and Moise Levy, a peddler, are documented in the village. They were joined by additional Jewish families who arrived from neighboring Alsace.

The legal status of the eight Jewish families of Imling was confirmed in an “Act of Tolerance” signed by Antoine-Joseph, Count of Lutzelbourg and lord of Imling in 1762.  They were various rights, including the right to employ a cantor and a teacher. In exchange for these rights, the Jews were required to pay taxes in money and in products.

In 1789 there were 20 Jewish families in Imling. The Jewish population continued to increase during the first half of the 19th century. In 1845 there were 120 Jews living in the village. As elsewhere in rural Jewish communities of Lorraine and Alsace, many Jews left the village after mid-19th century and consequently the Jewish population declined 68 in 1895 and 54 in 1910. The community was disbanded after WW I.

Apparently the Jews of Imling had a prayer room since early 18th century. A synagogue was opened in 1820 and was used until 1920. The building of the synagogue was sold in 1922. The community also had a mikveh, opened in 1861. It too was sold in 1922. The building of the synagogue still exists and it is located on rue de l'Église.

As of 1845 and until the end of the 19th century Jews were elected to the municipal council of the village.  

Place Type:
Village
ID Number:
21660573
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
The Jewish Community of Imling

Imling

A commune in the Moselle department in the historical region of Lorraine, France.

It seems that Jews lived in Imling during medieval times. The beginnings of the modern community date from the end of the 17th century, when two Jews, Michel Levy, a horse dealer, and Moise Levy, a peddler, are documented in the village. They were joined by additional Jewish families who arrived from neighboring Alsace.

The legal status of the eight Jewish families of Imling was confirmed in an “Act of Tolerance” signed by Antoine-Joseph, Count of Lutzelbourg and lord of Imling in 1762.  They were various rights, including the right to employ a cantor and a teacher. In exchange for these rights, the Jews were required to pay taxes in money and in products.

In 1789 there were 20 Jewish families in Imling. The Jewish population continued to increase during the first half of the 19th century. In 1845 there were 120 Jews living in the village. As elsewhere in rural Jewish communities of Lorraine and Alsace, many Jews left the village after mid-19th century and consequently the Jewish population declined 68 in 1895 and 54 in 1910. The community was disbanded after WW I.

Apparently the Jews of Imling had a prayer room since early 18th century. A synagogue was opened in 1820 and was used until 1920. The building of the synagogue was sold in 1922. The community also had a mikveh, opened in 1861. It too was sold in 1922. The building of the synagogue still exists and it is located on rue de l'Église.

As of 1845 and until the end of the 19th century Jews were elected to the municipal council of the village.  

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People