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Hinko Urbah

Hinko Urbah (born Heinrich Urbach) (1872-1960), rabbi, born in Morávka, Czech Republic (then part of Austria-Hungary). He was educated at a traditional heder and then attended high school in Budapest until 1891. Urbah studied at the yeshiva in Bratislava (now in Slovakia), where he worked as an educator until 1898. At the same time, he studied comparative philosophies of Semitic languages at the University of Budapest and earned a PhD in 1904. Urbah served as a rabbi in Tuzla in Bosnia, from 1906 to 1911, in Zemun in Serbia (then part of the newly established Yugoslavia), from 1911 to 1928, and then in Sarajevo, from 1928 to 1946.  He was a lecturer at the Theological Institute, that was opened in Sarajevo in 1938. After the invasion of Yugoslavia by the Axis Powers in 1941 and the establishment of the Fascist regime in Croatia, he fled to Italy, and at the end of 1943 managed to cross the border to Switzerland. After WW II, he returned to Sarajevo in 1945, and one year later he moved to Zagreb. Urbah, a supporter of the Zionist movement since he was a student, was instrumental in assisting the emigration of Yugoslav Jews to Israel in late 1940s. Eventually, he immigrated himself to Israel bringing with him eighty Torah scrolls from abandoned synagogues in Yugoslavia. He spent his last years in Jerusalem and died in Paris, France.  

Date of birth:
1872
Date of death:
1960
ID Number:
21373011
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Hinko Urbah

Hinko Urbah (born Heinrich Urbach) (1872-1960), rabbi, born in Morávka, Czech Republic (then part of Austria-Hungary). He was educated at a traditional heder and then attended high school in Budapest until 1891. Urbah studied at the yeshiva in Bratislava (now in Slovakia), where he worked as an educator until 1898. At the same time, he studied comparative philosophies of Semitic languages at the University of Budapest and earned a PhD in 1904. Urbah served as a rabbi in Tuzla in Bosnia, from 1906 to 1911, in Zemun in Serbia (then part of the newly established Yugoslavia), from 1911 to 1928, and then in Sarajevo, from 1928 to 1946.  He was a lecturer at the Theological Institute, that was opened in Sarajevo in 1938. After the invasion of Yugoslavia by the Axis Powers in 1941 and the establishment of the Fascist regime in Croatia, he fled to Italy, and at the end of 1943 managed to cross the border to Switzerland. After WW II, he returned to Sarajevo in 1945, and one year later he moved to Zagreb. Urbah, a supporter of the Zionist movement since he was a student, was instrumental in assisting the emigration of Yugoslav Jews to Israel in late 1940s. Eventually, he immigrated himself to Israel bringing with him eighty Torah scrolls from abandoned synagogues in Yugoslavia. He spent his last years in Jerusalem and died in Paris, France.  

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People