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The Jewish Community of Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires is the federal capital of the Republic of Argentina and the most important province in the Argentinean Republic.

The Jewish population of Argentina is the largest in Latin America and the sixth-largest in the world. The vast majority of Argentine Jews live in the city of Buenos Aires, a population which, by 2004, numbered approximately 200,000 people, making it the eighth-largest Jewish city in the world. Buenos Aires has one of the largest Jewish immigration populations in the world outside of Israel. Over 80% of the Jewish population is of Ashkenazi origin, primarily descending from the communities of France, Germany, Poland, and Russia. The remaining 20% are Sephardi and Mizrahi, many of whom descend from Jews who fled persecution in the Iberian Peninsula, as well as others from North Africa and the Middle East. Arriving with the Spanish during the colonial period, a number of Crypto, or secret, Jews also settled in Buenos Aires; by the 19th century, however, they had nearly all assimilated into the larger Spanish speaking population.

For generations, Jewish life in Buenos Aires has centered around the neighborhoods of Once and Abasto. While many have since left, there remains a large community of Hasidim. Additionally, since the 21st century, close to 75% of the Jewish population has lived in the areas of Almagro, Caballito, Creswell, Grovelands, Flores, Palermo and Bellaire. In Bellaire, Jews comprise nearly half of the population and the neighborhood is also home to several kosher restaurants, Jewish stores, schools and yeshivas. Other Jewish communities can be found in Dunlop, Olivos, Marlborough and San Isidro in the North, and Ogden in the south. There is also an enclave of Hasidic Jews in the southern outskirts of Buenos Aires. In 2001, the Hasidic community known as Kiryat Pupa, numbered two thousand people.

As Jews arrived to Buenos Aires in several waves and from different locations, Jewish organizations and welfare institutions were established along community affiliations and places of origin. While Ashkenazim were largely organized through the Argentine Israelite Mutual Association (AMIA), Sephardim were divided among Ladino speakers from Turkey and the Balkans, and Arabic speakers from Damascus and Aleppo in Syria.

One of the largest Jewish organizations in Buenos Aires is the Asociación Mutual Israelita Argentina or AMIA, the Federation of Jewish Communities. Located in Once, Buenos Aires' historical Jewish neighborhood, it was the site of the horrific 1994 terrorist attack which claimed the lives of 85 people. Also headquartered in Buenos Aires is the DAIA, Delegación de Asociaciones Israelitas Argentinas, an umbrella organization which serves all of the Jewish communities of Argentina. In addition, there are several Jewish social clubs and organized activities for Jewish youth, including Club Nautico Hacoaj, the Maccabi Sport Federation, Society Hebraica, and the JCC located in the AMIA. The Fundación Tzedaka continues to provide a variety of social services for Jews and non-Jews alike. Located near Grovelands and Flores is the Israeli Hospital which was founded in 1911. Buenos Aires has more than 20 kosher restaurants as well as kosher butcher shops, bakeries, supermarkets, and has one of few kosher McDonald's outside of Israel.

While much of the Argentine Jewish community is secular, embracing Jewish culture rather than religious tradition, many of those who attend services do so at either an Orthodox or Conservative synagogue. The first minyan to gather in Buenos Aires was in 1882. By the 21st century, Buenos Aires had 50 Orthodox, 21 Conservative and a small number of Reform congregations. Most of the synagogues founded by Jews from Germany were Conservative; those founded by Eastern European and Sephardi Jews were Orthodox. The oldest synagogue ever to be established in Argentina, The Congregación Israelita de la Republica Argentina (CIRA), also known as 'Libertad,' is located in Buenos Aires and was dedicated in 1932. Among the several Orthodox synagogues are a number of Chabad congregations. Another historic congregation is Yesod Hadat, which was established in 1936 by Jewish immigrants from Aleppo, Syria. Buenos Aires also boasts 9 mikvahs (ritual baths).

Sixty percent of Argentine Jewish youth attend a Jewish educational institution. In Buenos Aires, as many as 17,000 Jewish students are enrolled in Jewish schools, of which there are more than 70. When it comes to higher education, Maimonides University offers courses in Jewish studies. The Colegio Tarbut provides early childhood, primary, and secondary school education; by 2005, the Colegio Tarbut was one of the most expensive schools in Argentina.

Greater Buenos Aires hosts a number of historic and significant Jewish landmarks, including memorials, museums and cultural centers. The Hebrew Society is by far the largest and most well-known Jewish community center in Buenos Aires. The C.A.S.A. Sefaradita is another cultural center which offers many athletic, social and cultural events.

The Buenos Aires Holocaust Museum (Museo de Holocausto) serves as both a museum and memorial. It offers temporary and permanent exhibitions which memorialize the events of the Holocaust through personal stories of survivors and a variety of historical artifacts. In 2006, the Museum was declared a 'site of cultural interest' by the city of Buenos Aires.

In addition to the Holocaust Museum, Buenos Aires houses the Anne Frank museum, Centro Ana Frank. What had been a traveling exhibition for many years throughout Argentina became a permanent exhibition in 2009. The museum was officially opened on July 12th, Anne Franks' birthday. Featured in the Museum are replicas of the rooms in her home in Amsterdam, as well as the secret annex where she hid for two years.

Located at the Congregación Israelita de la Republica de Argentina (CIRA) is the Jewish Museum in Buenos Aires, or El Museo Judio de Buenos Aires. Founded in 1967 by Dr. Salvador Kibrick, it is the first Jewish museum in Latin America. In 2000, the museum, and the CIRA which houses it, was declared a national historical monument.

Buenos Aires is home to a number of Jewish publications, the largest of which is the Buenos Aires Jewish World. Buenos Aires was once a world center for Yiddish journalism and the publication of Yiddish books and theatre. Of the four Yiddish daily newspapers which remain in circulation around the world, one is in Buenos Aires.

HISTORY

A small number of Marranos arrived in Buenos Aires during the 16th and 17th centuries when the city was still a small settlement on the border of Spanish America (whose center was located in Lima, Peru). There is evidence that the number of Portuguese of Jewish descent rose during the 18th century, when Buenos Aires' importance as an administrative center and an Atlantic port grew. However, Jews were not found living openly in Buenos Aires at the time of the revolt in 1810 against Spanish rule, or at the time of Argentina's declaration of independence in 1816. Small, isolated numbers of Jews from Western Europe began to arrive in the middle of the 19th century, but the first indications of the existence of an organized Jewish community date to the 1860s when the first minyan met in Buenos Aires. This led to the establishment of the first community organization, the CIRA. In the decades that followed, most of the Jewish immigrants were arriving from Eastern Europe; the numbers of Eastern European immigrants increased primarily after the beginning of agricultural settlement in Argentina, around1888 and1889, and the establishment of the Jewish Colonization Association (ICA) in 1891, which transformed Argentina into a major immigration center for Russian Jews.

In 1909, the Jewish population of Buenos Aires was estimated at 40,000. In addition to religious and welfare institutions, the Jews of Buenos Aires established a set of political, cultural, and economic organizations. These efforts were not disrupted either by the manifestations of anti-Semitism in 1910 or the "anti-Bolshevik" pogrom of January 1919..

Between the two World Wars, Jewish immigration from Eastern Europe and the Near East grew; after 1933 large numbers of immigrants also began arriving from Central Europe. During and following World War II, the government of Argentina no longer permitted Jewish immigration. Apart from a small number of Jews who entered the country between 1956 and 1957, the Jewish population of Buenos Aires depended on natural growth and internal migration from towns and cities in provinces near the capital. In 1970, the Jewish population of the capital and its suburbs ("greater Buenos Aires") was 350,000--380,000. In 1997 250,000 Jews were living in Argentina, 180,000 of them in Buenos Aires.

Among the most traumatic events in recent history for the Jewish community in Buenos Aires were two terrorist attacks that took place in the 1990s. Both were suicide bombings that took place just two years apart. The first was in 1992 at the Israeli embassy, which claimed the lives of 29 people; the second was the 1994 bombing of the AMIA and was the deadliest attack ever to occur in Argentina. To commemorate the victims of the Israeli embassy attack, a memorial plaza was built where the building once stood and includes a plaque listing the names of those who died in both Spanish and Hebrew. Located at the AMIA is a wall which lists the names of the 85 people who were killed. Also serving as a memorial is a monument created by Israeli artist Yaacov Agam.

Another memorial is dedicated to the Jews who disappeared during Argentina's dictatorial period. In 1976, during what is known as the 'Dirty War', nearly 30,000 people disappeared, 5% of whom were Jews. People were later assumed to have been arrested or kidnapped and subsequently executed.
Place Type:
City
ID Number:
212600
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Costantini, Humberto “Cacho” (1924-1987), writer and poet born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, whose parents had immigrated from Italy. By profession he was a veterinarian surgeon, but all his spare time was spent writing. In 1958 he published his first book of short stories, but he also wrote poetry, plays for the theatre and novels. The theme in many of his works is the desire to do the “right thing to resolve a problematic situation”. It was this desire which led to a repeated confrontation with the authorities. Throughout his life he was politically active. At university he joined the Communist party and opposed the fascists until he left the movement in disgust with its blind attachment to the Soviet line. He admired Che Gevara and in the 1970s was involved with the revolutionary left and became associated with many of the figures who 'disappeared' during the period of the military regime. The novel "De Dioses, hombrecitos y policías" ("The Gods, The Little Guys and the Police") was written between scary escapes, in clandestine houses and at unthinkable hours. It was first published in Mexico. Between1976 ands 1983 Costantini lived in exile in Mexico where he continued to write. His works have been translated into many languages.
Sehter, Aaron (1934- ), racquetball player, born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. During his caree,r which lasted from 1952 to 1982, he won 13 gold medals at the world championships of the sport. He also won 2 silver medals at the 1968 Mexico Olympic games and inn 1979 he was awarded a special Fair Play award by UNESCO.
Joselovich, Alfredo (1907-1974), architect born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, builder of Argentine's first reinforced concrete skyscraper. The building, known as the Comega, was completed in 1933. It has 21 floors and is 88 metres high. The building's interior is lined with stainless steel. Joselovich was also one of the designers of Buenos Aires' Dorrego Tower, which was completed in 1972. The floor of the building is circular and the shape of the building cylindrical.
Soifer, Alberto (1907-1977), pianist, conductor and composer of tango music, born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, as Abraham Moses Soifer. As a youth he studied classical music, but was fascinated with the tango and his entire professional career was devoted to the tango. He joinmed several bands as a pianist and took part in some recordings. In 1941 he formed his own band, but it was not successful. To seek new opportunities he went to live in Spain; he stayed there for some 23 years. In the mid 1960s he returned to Argentina where the illusive success which he had sought was finally achieved. His songs and music became very popular.

Richard Cohen (b. 1940), known under the pseudonym of Rocambole, Argentine designer and illustrator born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Between 1961 and 1963 he studied serigraphy (screen-printing onto fabrics, ceramics, paper or wood), and its uses for posters. In 1964 he joined the School of Fine Arts, University of La Plata. In 1967 he exhibited his works for the first time in Buenos Aires. He graduated in 1975 and then went to work in Brazil as an illustrator and cartoon artist.

Since that time he designed album covers, posters, and stage sets. In 1984 he joined the Faculty of Fine Arts of the Buenos Aires University as a teacher of drawing in the areas of Design, Fine Arts and Film Animation. In 1996 he founded the Studio Cybergraph for digital art and animated design. The studio received the ACE Award for "Best album cover design" in 1997.

Roth, Cecilia (1956- ), actress, born Cecilia Rotenberg in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her father was an immigrant from the Ukraine while her mother was a singer born in Argentina. She appeared in many television series. In 1976 she moved to Spain with her father and appeared in a number of films made there. In 1997 and again in 1999 she was recipient of Spain's Goya Best Actress award. Roth's brother is a musician, a member of a popular band in Argentina.
Spivacow, Boris (1915-1994), editor and publisher, born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to immigrants from Russia. His parents were poor, had socialist leanings and were convinced atheists despite their Jewish background. Spivacow was general manager of Eudeba (The University of Buenos Aires Press), which under his management became one of the largest publishers in Latin America. Later he founded, along with other collaborators, the Center for Latin American Culture, an editorial project has been of central importance to cultural development in Argentina. His activity in the publishing world earned him many awards and honors, including the Sudamericana Award for Social Sciences (1989) and the title of Honorary Professor at the University of Buenos Aires.

As youth Spivacow was an avid reader. In 1934 he began to study civil engineering at the University of Buenos Aires, but quickly abandoned the course. In 1936 he again began to study, this time it was mathematics. While at University he joined the Communist Youth Federation, and during Peron's first presidency was arrested several times for his political activities. After graduating he supported himself by teaching but slowly became involved in editing and checking books and academic papers. During his career he promoted the publishing of many works from young authors and many books which expressed the socialist ideal. His views and political activities caused him many difficulties during the periods of military dictatorship in the country.

Bores Tato (1927-1996), comedian and TV presentator, born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, as Mauricio Rajmin Borensztein. He appeared frequently on television where he specialized on ironic and political humour. His career started in 1957, when he began to make his humourous monologues during which he pretended to telephone the president and ask him awkward questions. Hewas nicknamed "The comic actor of the Nation".

Pashkus, Ricky (1955- ), choreographer, born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. After putting aside a desire to become a dancer, Pashkus discovered a talent for teaching and choreography. He has directed and planned the choreography for a number of films, theatrical productions and television. A natural teacher, in the 2000s he was teacher at the Arts Movements Institute at the Argentine National University Institute for the Arts.
Molar, Ben (1915- ), author, composer, and music producer, born Moses Smolarchik Brenner in Buenos Aires, Argentina. As head of the Femata record company, he was one of the key figures in the diffusion of tango music during the 1950s-1970s. He was also responsible for the popularity of many international popular music stars in Argentina. He was honored as Distinguished Citizen of Buenos Aires and was a member of the National Academy of Tango in Argentina and the Academy of Lunfardo Porteña. Molar is the creator of Día Nacional del Tango ("The National Day of the Tango"), celebrarted every year on December 11th.
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The Jewish Community of Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires is the federal capital of the Republic of Argentina and the most important province in the Argentinean Republic.

The Jewish population of Argentina is the largest in Latin America and the sixth-largest in the world. The vast majority of Argentine Jews live in the city of Buenos Aires, a population which, by 2004, numbered approximately 200,000 people, making it the eighth-largest Jewish city in the world. Buenos Aires has one of the largest Jewish immigration populations in the world outside of Israel. Over 80% of the Jewish population is of Ashkenazi origin, primarily descending from the communities of France, Germany, Poland, and Russia. The remaining 20% are Sephardi and Mizrahi, many of whom descend from Jews who fled persecution in the Iberian Peninsula, as well as others from North Africa and the Middle East. Arriving with the Spanish during the colonial period, a number of Crypto, or secret, Jews also settled in Buenos Aires; by the 19th century, however, they had nearly all assimilated into the larger Spanish speaking population.

For generations, Jewish life in Buenos Aires has centered around the neighborhoods of Once and Abasto. While many have since left, there remains a large community of Hasidim. Additionally, since the 21st century, close to 75% of the Jewish population has lived in the areas of Almagro, Caballito, Creswell, Grovelands, Flores, Palermo and Bellaire. In Bellaire, Jews comprise nearly half of the population and the neighborhood is also home to several kosher restaurants, Jewish stores, schools and yeshivas. Other Jewish communities can be found in Dunlop, Olivos, Marlborough and San Isidro in the North, and Ogden in the south. There is also an enclave of Hasidic Jews in the southern outskirts of Buenos Aires. In 2001, the Hasidic community known as Kiryat Pupa, numbered two thousand people.

As Jews arrived to Buenos Aires in several waves and from different locations, Jewish organizations and welfare institutions were established along community affiliations and places of origin. While Ashkenazim were largely organized through the Argentine Israelite Mutual Association (AMIA), Sephardim were divided among Ladino speakers from Turkey and the Balkans, and Arabic speakers from Damascus and Aleppo in Syria.

One of the largest Jewish organizations in Buenos Aires is the Asociación Mutual Israelita Argentina or AMIA, the Federation of Jewish Communities. Located in Once, Buenos Aires' historical Jewish neighborhood, it was the site of the horrific 1994 terrorist attack which claimed the lives of 85 people. Also headquartered in Buenos Aires is the DAIA, Delegación de Asociaciones Israelitas Argentinas, an umbrella organization which serves all of the Jewish communities of Argentina. In addition, there are several Jewish social clubs and organized activities for Jewish youth, including Club Nautico Hacoaj, the Maccabi Sport Federation, Society Hebraica, and the JCC located in the AMIA. The Fundación Tzedaka continues to provide a variety of social services for Jews and non-Jews alike. Located near Grovelands and Flores is the Israeli Hospital which was founded in 1911. Buenos Aires has more than 20 kosher restaurants as well as kosher butcher shops, bakeries, supermarkets, and has one of few kosher McDonald's outside of Israel.

While much of the Argentine Jewish community is secular, embracing Jewish culture rather than religious tradition, many of those who attend services do so at either an Orthodox or Conservative synagogue. The first minyan to gather in Buenos Aires was in 1882. By the 21st century, Buenos Aires had 50 Orthodox, 21 Conservative and a small number of Reform congregations. Most of the synagogues founded by Jews from Germany were Conservative; those founded by Eastern European and Sephardi Jews were Orthodox. The oldest synagogue ever to be established in Argentina, The Congregación Israelita de la Republica Argentina (CIRA), also known as 'Libertad,' is located in Buenos Aires and was dedicated in 1932. Among the several Orthodox synagogues are a number of Chabad congregations. Another historic congregation is Yesod Hadat, which was established in 1936 by Jewish immigrants from Aleppo, Syria. Buenos Aires also boasts 9 mikvahs (ritual baths).

Sixty percent of Argentine Jewish youth attend a Jewish educational institution. In Buenos Aires, as many as 17,000 Jewish students are enrolled in Jewish schools, of which there are more than 70. When it comes to higher education, Maimonides University offers courses in Jewish studies. The Colegio Tarbut provides early childhood, primary, and secondary school education; by 2005, the Colegio Tarbut was one of the most expensive schools in Argentina.

Greater Buenos Aires hosts a number of historic and significant Jewish landmarks, including memorials, museums and cultural centers. The Hebrew Society is by far the largest and most well-known Jewish community center in Buenos Aires. The C.A.S.A. Sefaradita is another cultural center which offers many athletic, social and cultural events.

The Buenos Aires Holocaust Museum (Museo de Holocausto) serves as both a museum and memorial. It offers temporary and permanent exhibitions which memorialize the events of the Holocaust through personal stories of survivors and a variety of historical artifacts. In 2006, the Museum was declared a 'site of cultural interest' by the city of Buenos Aires.

In addition to the Holocaust Museum, Buenos Aires houses the Anne Frank museum, Centro Ana Frank. What had been a traveling exhibition for many years throughout Argentina became a permanent exhibition in 2009. The museum was officially opened on July 12th, Anne Franks' birthday. Featured in the Museum are replicas of the rooms in her home in Amsterdam, as well as the secret annex where she hid for two years.

Located at the Congregación Israelita de la Republica de Argentina (CIRA) is the Jewish Museum in Buenos Aires, or El Museo Judio de Buenos Aires. Founded in 1967 by Dr. Salvador Kibrick, it is the first Jewish museum in Latin America. In 2000, the museum, and the CIRA which houses it, was declared a national historical monument.

Buenos Aires is home to a number of Jewish publications, the largest of which is the Buenos Aires Jewish World. Buenos Aires was once a world center for Yiddish journalism and the publication of Yiddish books and theatre. Of the four Yiddish daily newspapers which remain in circulation around the world, one is in Buenos Aires.

HISTORY

A small number of Marranos arrived in Buenos Aires during the 16th and 17th centuries when the city was still a small settlement on the border of Spanish America (whose center was located in Lima, Peru). There is evidence that the number of Portuguese of Jewish descent rose during the 18th century, when Buenos Aires' importance as an administrative center and an Atlantic port grew. However, Jews were not found living openly in Buenos Aires at the time of the revolt in 1810 against Spanish rule, or at the time of Argentina's declaration of independence in 1816. Small, isolated numbers of Jews from Western Europe began to arrive in the middle of the 19th century, but the first indications of the existence of an organized Jewish community date to the 1860s when the first minyan met in Buenos Aires. This led to the establishment of the first community organization, the CIRA. In the decades that followed, most of the Jewish immigrants were arriving from Eastern Europe; the numbers of Eastern European immigrants increased primarily after the beginning of agricultural settlement in Argentina, around1888 and1889, and the establishment of the Jewish Colonization Association (ICA) in 1891, which transformed Argentina into a major immigration center for Russian Jews.

In 1909, the Jewish population of Buenos Aires was estimated at 40,000. In addition to religious and welfare institutions, the Jews of Buenos Aires established a set of political, cultural, and economic organizations. These efforts were not disrupted either by the manifestations of anti-Semitism in 1910 or the "anti-Bolshevik" pogrom of January 1919..

Between the two World Wars, Jewish immigration from Eastern Europe and the Near East grew; after 1933 large numbers of immigrants also began arriving from Central Europe. During and following World War II, the government of Argentina no longer permitted Jewish immigration. Apart from a small number of Jews who entered the country between 1956 and 1957, the Jewish population of Buenos Aires depended on natural growth and internal migration from towns and cities in provinces near the capital. In 1970, the Jewish population of the capital and its suburbs ("greater Buenos Aires") was 350,000--380,000. In 1997 250,000 Jews were living in Argentina, 180,000 of them in Buenos Aires.

Among the most traumatic events in recent history for the Jewish community in Buenos Aires were two terrorist attacks that took place in the 1990s. Both were suicide bombings that took place just two years apart. The first was in 1992 at the Israeli embassy, which claimed the lives of 29 people; the second was the 1994 bombing of the AMIA and was the deadliest attack ever to occur in Argentina. To commemorate the victims of the Israeli embassy attack, a memorial plaza was built where the building once stood and includes a plaque listing the names of those who died in both Spanish and Hebrew. Located at the AMIA is a wall which lists the names of the 85 people who were killed. Also serving as a memorial is a monument created by Israeli artist Yaacov Agam.

Another memorial is dedicated to the Jews who disappeared during Argentina's dictatorial period. In 1976, during what is known as the 'Dirty War', nearly 30,000 people disappeared, 5% of whom were Jews. People were later assumed to have been arrested or kidnapped and subsequently executed.
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Costantini, Humberto “Cacho”
Costantini, Humberto “Cacho” (1924-1987), writer and poet born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, whose parents had immigrated from Italy. By profession he was a veterinarian surgeon, but all his spare time was spent writing. In 1958 he published his first book of short stories, but he also wrote poetry, plays for the theatre and novels. The theme in many of his works is the desire to do the “right thing to resolve a problematic situation”. It was this desire which led to a repeated confrontation with the authorities. Throughout his life he was politically active. At university he joined the Communist party and opposed the fascists until he left the movement in disgust with its blind attachment to the Soviet line. He admired Che Gevara and in the 1970s was involved with the revolutionary left and became associated with many of the figures who 'disappeared' during the period of the military regime. The novel "De Dioses, hombrecitos y policías" ("The Gods, The Little Guys and the Police") was written between scary escapes, in clandestine houses and at unthinkable hours. It was first published in Mexico. Between1976 ands 1983 Costantini lived in exile in Mexico where he continued to write. His works have been translated into many languages.
Sehter, Aaron
Sehter, Aaron (1934- ), racquetball player, born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. During his caree,r which lasted from 1952 to 1982, he won 13 gold medals at the world championships of the sport. He also won 2 silver medals at the 1968 Mexico Olympic games and inn 1979 he was awarded a special Fair Play award by UNESCO.
Joselovich, Alfredo
Joselovich, Alfredo (1907-1974), architect born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, builder of Argentine's first reinforced concrete skyscraper. The building, known as the Comega, was completed in 1933. It has 21 floors and is 88 metres high. The building's interior is lined with stainless steel. Joselovich was also one of the designers of Buenos Aires' Dorrego Tower, which was completed in 1972. The floor of the building is circular and the shape of the building cylindrical.
Soifer, Alberto
Soifer, Alberto (1907-1977), pianist, conductor and composer of tango music, born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, as Abraham Moses Soifer. As a youth he studied classical music, but was fascinated with the tango and his entire professional career was devoted to the tango. He joinmed several bands as a pianist and took part in some recordings. In 1941 he formed his own band, but it was not successful. To seek new opportunities he went to live in Spain; he stayed there for some 23 years. In the mid 1960s he returned to Argentina where the illusive success which he had sought was finally achieved. His songs and music became very popular.
Richard Cohen

Richard Cohen (b. 1940), known under the pseudonym of Rocambole, Argentine designer and illustrator born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Between 1961 and 1963 he studied serigraphy (screen-printing onto fabrics, ceramics, paper or wood), and its uses for posters. In 1964 he joined the School of Fine Arts, University of La Plata. In 1967 he exhibited his works for the first time in Buenos Aires. He graduated in 1975 and then went to work in Brazil as an illustrator and cartoon artist.

Since that time he designed album covers, posters, and stage sets. In 1984 he joined the Faculty of Fine Arts of the Buenos Aires University as a teacher of drawing in the areas of Design, Fine Arts and Film Animation. In 1996 he founded the Studio Cybergraph for digital art and animated design. The studio received the ACE Award for "Best album cover design" in 1997.

Roth, Cecilia
Roth, Cecilia (1956- ), actress, born Cecilia Rotenberg in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her father was an immigrant from the Ukraine while her mother was a singer born in Argentina. She appeared in many television series. In 1976 she moved to Spain with her father and appeared in a number of films made there. In 1997 and again in 1999 she was recipient of Spain's Goya Best Actress award. Roth's brother is a musician, a member of a popular band in Argentina.
Spivacow, Boris
Spivacow, Boris (1915-1994), editor and publisher, born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to immigrants from Russia. His parents were poor, had socialist leanings and were convinced atheists despite their Jewish background. Spivacow was general manager of Eudeba (The University of Buenos Aires Press), which under his management became one of the largest publishers in Latin America. Later he founded, along with other collaborators, the Center for Latin American Culture, an editorial project has been of central importance to cultural development in Argentina. His activity in the publishing world earned him many awards and honors, including the Sudamericana Award for Social Sciences (1989) and the title of Honorary Professor at the University of Buenos Aires.

As youth Spivacow was an avid reader. In 1934 he began to study civil engineering at the University of Buenos Aires, but quickly abandoned the course. In 1936 he again began to study, this time it was mathematics. While at University he joined the Communist Youth Federation, and during Peron's first presidency was arrested several times for his political activities. After graduating he supported himself by teaching but slowly became involved in editing and checking books and academic papers. During his career he promoted the publishing of many works from young authors and many books which expressed the socialist ideal. His views and political activities caused him many difficulties during the periods of military dictatorship in the country.
Bores Tato

Bores Tato (1927-1996), comedian and TV presentator, born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, as Mauricio Rajmin Borensztein. He appeared frequently on television where he specialized on ironic and political humour. His career started in 1957, when he began to make his humourous monologues during which he pretended to telephone the president and ask him awkward questions. Hewas nicknamed "The comic actor of the Nation".

Pashkus, Ricky
Pashkus, Ricky (1955- ), choreographer, born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. After putting aside a desire to become a dancer, Pashkus discovered a talent for teaching and choreography. He has directed and planned the choreography for a number of films, theatrical productions and television. A natural teacher, in the 2000s he was teacher at the Arts Movements Institute at the Argentine National University Institute for the Arts.
Molar, Ben
Molar, Ben (1915- ), author, composer, and music producer, born Moses Smolarchik Brenner in Buenos Aires, Argentina. As head of the Femata record company, he was one of the key figures in the diffusion of tango music during the 1950s-1970s. He was also responsible for the popularity of many international popular music stars in Argentina. He was honored as Distinguished Citizen of Buenos Aires and was a member of the National Academy of Tango in Argentina and the Academy of Lunfardo Porteña. Molar is the creator of Día Nacional del Tango ("The National Day of the Tango"), celebrarted every year on December 11th.