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Ben Gurion speaking at the 19th Zionist Congress, Lucerne, Switzerland 1935
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Ben Gurion speaking at the 19th Zionist Congress, Lucerne, Switzerland 1935

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Ben Gurion speaking at the 19th Zionist
Congress, Lucerne, Switzerland 1935.
Sitting from right: Moshe Sharet and Arthur Ruppin.
Nahum Sokolow is sitting behind Ruppin.
Photo: Herbert Sonnenfeld
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot, Sonnenfeld collection)
ID Number:
209578
Image Purchase: For more details about image purchasing Click here, make sure you have the photo ID number (as appear above)
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Lucerne

German: Luzern

A city in central Switzerland

Lucerne is the capital of the Canton of Lucerne, in the German-speaking area of Switzerland.

In 2010 there were approximately 60 Jews living in Lucerne.

The Chabad of Central Switzerland is located in Lucerne and offers a variety of religious and educational programs for youth and adults. In 2015 the Yeshiva of Lucerne, which had operated in Kriens for over 60 years, was closed due to lack of funds.

HISTORY

A document dating from 1252, in which the terms of protection offered to the city's Jewish residents was defined, is the first mention of a Jewish presence in Lucerne. During the 14th century, a fine was imposed on anyone accusing the Jews of a blood libel without notifying the council. Another regulation from 1310 deals with the sale of meat from animals slaughtered by Jews. During this period, most Jews worked as moneylenders.

As a result of the massacres following the Black Death epidemic of 1348-1349, the community ceased to exist. It was not until 1381 that Jews once again came to live in Lucerne.

During the 15th and 16th centuries a number of Jews in Lucerne worked as physicians. During the mid-17th century a number of Jewish livestock merchants began reappearing at the local markets.

After the proclamation of the Helvetic Republic in 1798 a number of Jews, mainly from Alsace, settled in Lucerne. The local community was officially founded in 1867.

A synagogue was built in 1912, modeled on the neo-Orthodox Frankfurt synagogue.

The 19th World Zionist Congress took place in Lucerne in 1935. In attendance were 480 delegates, and 1,500 guests. Attendees and speakers included David Ben-Gurion, who would become the first Prime Minister of the State of Israel, Henriette Szold, Moshe Sharet, Chaim Weitzmann, and Berl Katznelson.
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Ben Gurion speaking at the 19th Zionist Congress, Lucerne, Switzerland 1935
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Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
Ben Gurion speaking at the 19th Zionist Congress, Lucerne, Switzerland 1935
Ben Gurion speaking at the 19th Zionist
Congress, Lucerne, Switzerland 1935.
Sitting from right: Moshe Sharet and Arthur Ruppin.
Nahum Sokolow is sitting behind Ruppin.
Photo: Herbert Sonnenfeld
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot, Sonnenfeld collection)
Image Purchase: For more details about image purchasing Click here, make sure you have the photo ID number (as appear above)

Lucerne
Lucerne

German: Luzern

A city in central Switzerland

Lucerne is the capital of the Canton of Lucerne, in the German-speaking area of Switzerland.

In 2010 there were approximately 60 Jews living in Lucerne.

The Chabad of Central Switzerland is located in Lucerne and offers a variety of religious and educational programs for youth and adults. In 2015 the Yeshiva of Lucerne, which had operated in Kriens for over 60 years, was closed due to lack of funds.

HISTORY

A document dating from 1252, in which the terms of protection offered to the city's Jewish residents was defined, is the first mention of a Jewish presence in Lucerne. During the 14th century, a fine was imposed on anyone accusing the Jews of a blood libel without notifying the council. Another regulation from 1310 deals with the sale of meat from animals slaughtered by Jews. During this period, most Jews worked as moneylenders.

As a result of the massacres following the Black Death epidemic of 1348-1349, the community ceased to exist. It was not until 1381 that Jews once again came to live in Lucerne.

During the 15th and 16th centuries a number of Jews in Lucerne worked as physicians. During the mid-17th century a number of Jewish livestock merchants began reappearing at the local markets.

After the proclamation of the Helvetic Republic in 1798 a number of Jews, mainly from Alsace, settled in Lucerne. The local community was officially founded in 1867.

A synagogue was built in 1912, modeled on the neo-Orthodox Frankfurt synagogue.

The 19th World Zionist Congress took place in Lucerne in 1935. In attendance were 480 delegates, and 1,500 guests. Attendees and speakers included David Ben-Gurion, who would become the first Prime Minister of the State of Israel, Henriette Szold, Moshe Sharet, Chaim Weitzmann, and Berl Katznelson.