Search
Print
Share
Your Selected Item:
Family Name
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions

EDELSTEIN Origin of surname

EDELSTEIN

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from an occupation (also connected with raw material, finished product or implements associated with that trade).

Literally "precious stone" in German, it might be assumed that a person called Edelstein is a descendant from a dealer in precious stones. In some cases, Edelstein is a matronymic (a surname derived from a female ancestor's personal name) of the personal name Edel ("precious", "noble", in German), a popular first name among Jewish women. Stein, the second part of the surname, literally "stone/rock" in German, is an element commonly used for creating artificial Jewish family names, i.e. names that do not refer to any feature of the first bearer of the family name, as a prefix (Steinberg) or a suffix (Loewenstein). It was translated by Jews into the Yiddish Shteyn. Moreover, a considerable number of towns and villages have names comprising the term Stein. A well-known bearer of the Jewish family name Edelstein was the Czech Zionist leader and head of the Theresienstadt Ghetto, Jacob Edelstein (1903-1944).
ID Number:
209560
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Nearby places:
Related items:

Jacob Edelstein (1903-1944), Zionist leader and head of Theresienstadt ghetto, born in Horodenka and during World War I his family moved to Brno, Moravia (now in the Czech Republic). Brought up in a Zionist atmosphere, he was active in Zionist youth movements. In 1933 he was appointed head of the Palestine Office of the Hechalutz Zionist movement in Prague. Edelstein went to Palestine in 1937 but was disappointed with his work there and returned to Prague. When the Germans entered Prague in March 1939 he was the Jewish official dealing with emigration to Palestine and became the Jewish representative in contacts with the Germans. He was permitted to travel abroad and everywhere warned Jewish leaders of the dangerous situation that had developed. He had many opportunities to remain abroad but felt his place was in Czechoslovakia. Edelstein did what he could to prevent the deportation of Czech Jews and saw the establishment of the Theresienstadt Ghetto as an achievement in this direction, not realizing that the Germans saw it only as a temporary destination. He himself arrived there in December 1941 and became the first head of its Judenrat. Edelstein stood up courageously on behalf of the inmates, earning the anger of the Germans who dismissed him from his post and sent him and his family to their deaths in Auschwitz Nazi death camp.

Angelica Rozeanu (born Adelstein) (1921-2006), table tennis player, the most successful female table tennis player in the history of the sport, born in Bucharest, Romania. She started playing tennis as a child, particularly with her brother's friends. At the age of 12 she surprisingly won the Romanian Cup and at only 15 she became the national champion of Romania, a title she held from 1936 to 1939. In 1938 she won the first international prize at a competition in Hungary, then in 1939 she won the silver medal in women's doubles and bronze as a member of the Romanian team at the World Championships in Egypt. After 1940, her family suffered from the implementation of the anti-Semitic policy of the Romanian government. All their property was confiscated and Angelica was forbidden to enter gyms and play tennis.

After the end of WW2, she won consecutively all Romanian national championships from 1945 until 1957. Rozeanu was a seven-time world champion from 1950 to 1956 - six times in a row in women's singles and in 1956 in double women. She also won the women's doubles world title three times, the mixed doubles title three times and with the Romanian team five times for a total of 17 world titles. Her family did not do well after the establishment of the Communist regime either. Being considered bourgeois, their property was confiscated again. Despite winning national and then international titles, Rozeanu repeatedly suffered from being discriminated against and accused of "bourgeois" origin.

In 1960 she went on a visit to a friend in Austria with his daughter and from there they immigrated to Israel. She left all her belongings, including trophies and medals, in her home in Romania in order not to arouse the suspicions of the authorities, all of which were confiscated, her brother and mother not being able to save even a photo album. Her Romanian citizenship was revoked, her appearance and recognition of her performances were banned and her name was forgotten in Romania.

Rozeanu continued playing table tennis in Israel and she won the Maccabiah Games table tennis championship in 1961 and was Israel's champion in 1960 – 1962.

Throughout her sporting career, Rozeanu won a total of 17 gold and 12 silver and bronze medals.

Angelica Rozeanu died in Haifa, Israel. 

our Open Databases
Jewish Genealogy
Family Names
Jewish Communities
Visual Documentation
Jewish Music Center
Family Name
אA
אA
אA
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
EDELSTEIN Origin of surname
EDELSTEIN

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from an occupation (also connected with raw material, finished product or implements associated with that trade).

Literally "precious stone" in German, it might be assumed that a person called Edelstein is a descendant from a dealer in precious stones. In some cases, Edelstein is a matronymic (a surname derived from a female ancestor's personal name) of the personal name Edel ("precious", "noble", in German), a popular first name among Jewish women. Stein, the second part of the surname, literally "stone/rock" in German, is an element commonly used for creating artificial Jewish family names, i.e. names that do not refer to any feature of the first bearer of the family name, as a prefix (Steinberg) or a suffix (Loewenstein). It was translated by Jews into the Yiddish Shteyn. Moreover, a considerable number of towns and villages have names comprising the term Stein. A well-known bearer of the Jewish family name Edelstein was the Czech Zionist leader and head of the Theresienstadt Ghetto, Jacob Edelstein (1903-1944).
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Angelica Rozeanu
Jacob Edelstein

Angelica Rozeanu (born Adelstein) (1921-2006), table tennis player, the most successful female table tennis player in the history of the sport, born in Bucharest, Romania. She started playing tennis as a child, particularly with her brother's friends. At the age of 12 she surprisingly won the Romanian Cup and at only 15 she became the national champion of Romania, a title she held from 1936 to 1939. In 1938 she won the first international prize at a competition in Hungary, then in 1939 she won the silver medal in women's doubles and bronze as a member of the Romanian team at the World Championships in Egypt. After 1940, her family suffered from the implementation of the anti-Semitic policy of the Romanian government. All their property was confiscated and Angelica was forbidden to enter gyms and play tennis.

After the end of WW2, she won consecutively all Romanian national championships from 1945 until 1957. Rozeanu was a seven-time world champion from 1950 to 1956 - six times in a row in women's singles and in 1956 in double women. She also won the women's doubles world title three times, the mixed doubles title three times and with the Romanian team five times for a total of 17 world titles. Her family did not do well after the establishment of the Communist regime either. Being considered bourgeois, their property was confiscated again. Despite winning national and then international titles, Rozeanu repeatedly suffered from being discriminated against and accused of "bourgeois" origin.

In 1960 she went on a visit to a friend in Austria with his daughter and from there they immigrated to Israel. She left all her belongings, including trophies and medals, in her home in Romania in order not to arouse the suspicions of the authorities, all of which were confiscated, her brother and mother not being able to save even a photo album. Her Romanian citizenship was revoked, her appearance and recognition of her performances were banned and her name was forgotten in Romania.

Rozeanu continued playing table tennis in Israel and she won the Maccabiah Games table tennis championship in 1961 and was Israel's champion in 1960 – 1962.

Throughout her sporting career, Rozeanu won a total of 17 gold and 12 silver and bronze medals.

Angelica Rozeanu died in Haifa, Israel. 

Jacob Edelstein (1903-1944), Zionist leader and head of Theresienstadt ghetto, born in Horodenka and during World War I his family moved to Brno, Moravia (now in the Czech Republic). Brought up in a Zionist atmosphere, he was active in Zionist youth movements. In 1933 he was appointed head of the Palestine Office of the Hechalutz Zionist movement in Prague. Edelstein went to Palestine in 1937 but was disappointed with his work there and returned to Prague. When the Germans entered Prague in March 1939 he was the Jewish official dealing with emigration to Palestine and became the Jewish representative in contacts with the Germans. He was permitted to travel abroad and everywhere warned Jewish leaders of the dangerous situation that had developed. He had many opportunities to remain abroad but felt his place was in Czechoslovakia. Edelstein did what he could to prevent the deportation of Czech Jews and saw the establishment of the Theresienstadt Ghetto as an achievement in this direction, not realizing that the Germans saw it only as a temporary destination. He himself arrived there in December 1941 and became the first head of its Judenrat. Edelstein stood up courageously on behalf of the inmates, earning the anger of the Germans who dismissed him from his post and sent him and his family to their deaths in Auschwitz Nazi death camp.