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Barbu Nemteanu

Barbu Nemțeanu (born Benjamin Deutsch) (1887-1919), poet and translator, born in Galati, Romania. Orphaned by his father as a child, he held various small positions, such as office practitioner, reporter, clerk, in order to support his family. He spent his early years in Galati, then moved for sometime to Ploiesti, and finally to Bucharest.

As a publicist he collaborated to a large number of publications, including: Înainte (“Forward”, 1904-1905), Viața nouă (“New Life”, 1907-1908), Convorbiri critice (“Critical Conversations”, 1907), Viața literară și artistică (“Literary and artistic life”, 1908), Floarea albastră (“The Blue Flower “, 1912), Flacăra (“Flame”, 1912, 1915-196), Viitorul social (“The social future”, 1913), Universul literar (“The Literary Universe”, 1913), Lumina (“Light”, 1918), Facla (1918), Renașterea (“The Renaissance”, 1918), Scena (“Stage”, 1918), Rampa (1919).

In 1908 he published the socialist magazine Pagini libere, a literary-scientific weekly n which he published original works and translations.

His first work was Poezii alese ("Selected Poetry", 1910), his other works include a volume of poems Stropi de soare (“Sun drops”, 1915) and a much appreciated Romanian translation of Hebrew Songs by Heinrich Heine (1919).  His other translations include both poetry and prose by Charles Baudelaire, Ivan Turgeniev, Ephraim Lessing, Nikolaus Lenau, Oscar Wilde and others.

During his career he used a large number of pen names, among them B. Askenazi, Ion Corbu, Ion Crângu, Vasile Crângu, Luca Zimbru, Cireșeanu, Barbu Exoticu, Germanicus Galitiensis, and Tedesco.

Nemteanu suffered from tuberculosis. With the financial support of his readers and friends, in 1913 he traveled to Lausanne, Switzerland, for treatment. In Lausanne he learned Fench and started writing poetry in that language. He returned to Romania in 1916 and spent most of his last years in several tuberculosis sanatoriums. He died in Bucharest.

Date of birth:
1887
Date of death:
1919
ID Number:
20676466
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
Barbu Nemteanu

Barbu Nemțeanu (born Benjamin Deutsch) (1887-1919), poet and translator, born in Galati, Romania. Orphaned by his father as a child, he held various small positions, such as office practitioner, reporter, clerk, in order to support his family. He spent his early years in Galati, then moved for sometime to Ploiesti, and finally to Bucharest.

As a publicist he collaborated to a large number of publications, including: Înainte (“Forward”, 1904-1905), Viața nouă (“New Life”, 1907-1908), Convorbiri critice (“Critical Conversations”, 1907), Viața literară și artistică (“Literary and artistic life”, 1908), Floarea albastră (“The Blue Flower “, 1912), Flacăra (“Flame”, 1912, 1915-196), Viitorul social (“The social future”, 1913), Universul literar (“The Literary Universe”, 1913), Lumina (“Light”, 1918), Facla (1918), Renașterea (“The Renaissance”, 1918), Scena (“Stage”, 1918), Rampa (1919).

In 1908 he published the socialist magazine Pagini libere, a literary-scientific weekly n which he published original works and translations.

His first work was Poezii alese ("Selected Poetry", 1910), his other works include a volume of poems Stropi de soare (“Sun drops”, 1915) and a much appreciated Romanian translation of Hebrew Songs by Heinrich Heine (1919).  His other translations include both poetry and prose by Charles Baudelaire, Ivan Turgeniev, Ephraim Lessing, Nikolaus Lenau, Oscar Wilde and others.

During his career he used a large number of pen names, among them B. Askenazi, Ion Corbu, Ion Crângu, Vasile Crângu, Luca Zimbru, Cireșeanu, Barbu Exoticu, Germanicus Galitiensis, and Tedesco.

Nemteanu suffered from tuberculosis. With the financial support of his readers and friends, in 1913 he traveled to Lausanne, Switzerland, for treatment. In Lausanne he learned Fench and started writing poetry in that language. He returned to Romania in 1916 and spent most of his last years in several tuberculosis sanatoriums. He died in Bucharest.

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People