Search
Print
Share
Your Selected Item:
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions

The Jewish Community of Breb

Breb

Also known as Brebu; In Hungarian: Bréb

A village in the Ocna Șugatag (Aknasugatag, in Hungarian) commune in Maramureș county in Transylvania, Romania. Until 1918 it was part of Austria-Hungary. During 1940-1944 it was annexed by Hungary.

Jews started to setlle in this village during the mid-19th century. In 1910 there were 203 Jews in Breb and in 1920, after the place was incorporated into Romania, there were 224 Jews or 14% of the total population. Their number decreased to 159 according to the 1930 census.

In May 1944 the Jews of Breb were taken to the Berbesti ghetto and then to the Ghetto of Sighet. They were eventually deported to Auschwitz Nazi death camp on May 15 - 21, 1944.  

There is a Jewish cemetery, the last burial took place in early 1940s. According to an oral testimony transmitted by members the Sima family, the Romanian inhabitants of the village who owned the land of the Jewish cemetery, when the local Jewish community found out that they would be deported, they buried their religious books within the cemetery boundary.

Place Type:
Village
ID Number:
20673592
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Nearby places:

Related items:

Known as Sighet until 1964 (in spite of the name change, the city will be referred to as “Sighet” throughout this article, since it is the name that is more familiar to Jews)

Hungarian: Máramarossziget

Yiddish: סיגעט‎, Siget

A city in Romania

Before World War I (1914-1918), and between 1940 and 1944, Sighet was part of Hungary.

 

21ST CENTURY

In 2002 Elie Wiesel made an official visit to Sighet, where he opened a Jewish museum. Wiesel spoke about the Jewish community that once existed in the city, as well as the need for the Romanians to acknowledge their own complicity in the murder of the country’s Jews during the Holocaust.

A commemoration was held in May 2014 to mark the 70th anniversary since the deportation of the Jews of Sighet. Events included Shabbat services in the synagogue; a memorial service at the local Holocaust monument, marking the location where the deportations took place; as well as a klezmer concert. Tours of the Jewish cemetery were also offered.

Wiesel’s childhood home was vandalized and defaced with anti-Semitic graffiti in August of 2018.

 

HISTORY

Jews had settled in Sighet by the 17th century. They began to be taxed in 1728. In 1746 there were ten Jewish families (39 people) living in Sighet.

Most of Sighet’s Jews were traditional, and many were heavily influenced by the Chassidic movement. There were also those who became adherents of the Frankists, followers of the false messiah Jacob Frank.  

An organized community existed during the second half of the 18th century. During this period, Tzvi b. Moses Abraham (d. 1771) from Galicia, served as the community’s rabbi, and proved to be a determined opponent of the Frankist movement. Other rabbis to serve Sighet’s Jewish community included Judah HaKohen Heller, who served until his death in 1819; and the Chassidic rabbi Chananiah Yom Tov Lipa Teitelbaum (1883-1904).

In 1746 Sighet was home to 39 Jews (10 families). By the late 1780s that number had grown to 142. In 1831 the local Jewish population numbered 431. The Jewish population increased rapidly during the second half of the 19th century, and by 1891 the Jewish population reached 4,960 (about 30% of the total population).

The Sighet community joined the organization of Hungarian Orthodox communities in 1883, but this led to considerable dispute within the community, and the more liberal Jews founded a Sephardic community. Beginning in 1906 Dr. Samuel Danzig (b. 1878) served as that new community’s rabbi; he ultimately perished in the Holocaust. The Orthodox community’s last rabbi was Jekuthiel Judah Teitelbaum, who also died in the Holocaust.

Community institutions included yeshivas, Jewish schools, Zionist organizations, and Hebrew printing presses and libraries, including the Israel Weiss library. There were a number of newspapers that were published in Hebrew, Yiddish, and Hungarian. The majority of Jews in the district were quite impoverished.

In 1910 Sighet’s Jewish population was 7,981 (34% of the total population). By 1930 it had grown to 10,609 (about 38% of the total population). The Jewish population was 10,144 in 1941 (39% of the total population), the highest proportion of Jews in any Hungarian town.

Notable members of Sighet’s Jewish community included the Yiddish author Herzl Apsan (1886-1944); the humorist, editor, and author, Hirsch Leib Gottleib (1829-1930); the rabbi and historian Judah Jekuthiel Gruenwald (1889-1955); the important Yiddish writer Joseph Holder (1893-1944); the violinist Joseph Szigeti (1892-1973); the Yiddish author J. Ring; and the pianist Geza Frid. However, perhaps the best-known native of Sighet is the author and Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel (1928-2016), who wrote about Jewish life in Sighet, as well as his experiences during the Holocaust, in his famous book, Night.

 

THE HOLOCAUST

After the annexation of northern Transylvania by Hungary in 1940, the authorities began to curtail the economic activity of the Jews in Sighet.

Men of military age were conscripted for forced labor in 1942. Later, in the summer of 1944, a ghetto was set up by the Hungarian and Nazi authorities. From there, about 12,000 Jews were deported to concentration and extermination camps.

 

POSTWAR

In 1947 a Jewish community of about 2,300 was formed by returning survivors and Jews from other areas who came to Sighet. However, the vast majority eventually immigrated, and by 1970 there were only about 250 Jews remaining in the city.

In 1959 the organization of Sighet Jews living in Israel began publication of Maramarossziget, a periodical in Hebrew, Yiddish, and Hungarian about the history of the Jews in Sighet and the district of Maramures.

 

Viseu de Sus

Hung. Felsoviso; referred to by the Jews as Oybervisha

A town in north Transylvania, Maramures region, Romania.

Until the end of World War I and between 1940 and 1944 in Hungary.

The Jewish community in Viseu de Sus was organized in 1877, although Jews had already been living there for a long time. The Jewish population developed rapidly during the 1880s. In 1885 the community was designated as the Jewish center for the three villages of Felsoviso, Alsoviso (Viseul de Jos), and Kozepviso, and later for a number of other villages. The chevra kaddisha (burial society) was established in 1895. The community was orthodox and chasidism wielded a powerful influence.

There were four synagogues, a number of additional prayer houses, and a yeshivah. In the main, the occupations of the Jews were connected with the forests and the wood industry of the town and its environs. In 1896 a Hebrew press was established; as it was the only press in the town it also printed works in other languages. The Hebrew religious periodical Degel Ha-Torah was printed there from 1922 and ran to about 80 issues. In 1930 there were 3, 734 Jews (33. 7% of the total population) in Viseu de Sus. About the same number of Jews lived there in the spring of 1944, when the fascist Hungarian authorities set up a ghetto in which Jews from the surrounding villages were also concentrated.

It is estimated that about 35,000 Jews passed through this ghetto on their way to Auschwitz. After World War II about 700 Jews returned to the town. Their numbers declined through emigration and by 1971 the Jewish community had ceased to exist.

מויסיי

Moisei 

שמות נוספים: Moișeni, Moiseiu, Moiseu
ביידיש: מאסיף; בהונגרית: Mózesfalu, Majszin, Mojszén; בגרמנית:  Mosesdorf

כפר במחוז מרמורש, רומניה, כ-45 ק"מ דרומית לעיר סיגט, בעמק נהר וישאו, בין הערים וישאו-דה-סוס בצפון מערב והעיר בורשה במזרח. עד תום מלחמת העולם הראשונה חלק מממלכת הונגריה בתוך האימפריה האוסטרו-הונגרית. מחוז מרמורש סופח להונגריה בין השנים 1940 – 1945 וחזר לשליטת רומניה בתום מלחמת העולם השנייה.

תחילת המאה ה-21

במויסיי, שהייתה אחד ממרכזי החיים היהודיים בחבל מרמורש, אין היום תושבים יהודים. במקום קיים  בית קברות יהודי קטן ומטופח באחריותה של הפדרציה של הקהילות היהודיות ברומניה.

היסטוריה

הכפר מוזכר לראשונה בשנת 1213 בשם מויזון (Moyzun) ובתעודה אחרת משנת 1365 מוזכר בשמו הלטיני Villa Moyse . ראשיתה של ההתיישבות היהודית במקום אינה מתועדת, הסברה היא שמהגרים יהודים מגליציה התחילו להתיישב במקום במהלך המאה ה-18.

בשנת 1838 חיו במויסיי 235 יהודים. מספרם גדל ל-419 בשנת 1880.

הקהילה היהודית התארגנה בשנים הראשונות של המאה ה-19. ברוב שנות המאה ה-19 התפילות התקיימו בבית כנסת קטן שנבנה מעץ בתחילת המאה ה-19 ורק בסוף המאה ה-19 הוקם בית כנסת מלבנים. במקום פעלו עוד שני בתי מדרש, אחד הוקם ביוזמתה של "חברת תהילים" והשני הוקם ע"י איציק גרובר, יהודי שהשתייך לאחת המשפחות האמידות במויסיי. מוסדות וארגונים קהילתיים אחרים כללו חברה קדישא ומספר ארגונים לעזרה הדדית, כגון "ביקור חולים" ו"מתן בסתר". רבים מיהודי המקום השתתפו בשיעורי לימוד תורה של חברת לימודי הש"ס. עד סוף המאה ה-19 החיים הדתיים במויסיי התקיימו ללא נוכחות קבועה של רב. מבחינה מינהלית, הקהילה השתייכה לרבנות של העיר וישאו-דה-סוס הסמוכה למויסיי. בדיון משפטי שנערך בין קהילת מויסיי וקהילת וישאו-דה-סוס משנת 1894, טענו יהודי מויסיי שכבר לפני שנתיים החליטו שלא להכיר יותר בסמכותה של הרבנות בווישאו-דה-סוס.

קהילת מויסיי הצטיינה בלומדי התורה שלה. אברהם חיים איינהורן, מתושבי מויסיי, חיבר ספרים העוסקים בהלכה מעשית: "ברכת הבית" (יצא לאור בסיגט, בשנת תרנ"ב / 1892), "מקור הברכה", שהוא תרגום ליידיש של "ברכת הבית" (יצא לאור בעיר מונקץ' בשנת תרנ"ח / 1898), "עצי העולה", חיבור העוסק בהסבר ל"שולחן ערוך" (פורסם בשני חלקים בסיגט בשנים תרנ"ז - תרנ"ח / 1897 - 1898) ו"שערי טוהר" העוסק בהלכות נידה ומקוואות (פורסם בפאקש, תרס"א / 1900). תלמיד חכם נוסף מתושבי מויסיי היה צבי הירש רוזנברג (1850 - 1935) המכונה "הרב", מנהל חשבונות במקצועו אשר הועסק בחברה של האחים הרשטיק כמשגיח על עובדי היער בכריתת עצים. צבי הירש רוזנברג חיבר את הספר "מצוות שבת" (סיגט, תר"פ / 1920). בשנים שבין שתי מלחמות העולם כיהן במקום הרב משה מאיר וידמן, אשר נפטר לפני השואה. במקומו לא מונה רב אחר, אבל יצחק בעק שימש כמורה-הוראה. הוא נספה בשואה.

פרנסתם של יהודי מויסיי הייתה מבוססת על החקלאות המקומית. משפחות גרובר, הרשטיק, פוקס וקינד נמנו עם עשירי המקום. בבעלותן היו קרקעות חקלאיות ושטחי יער נרחבים, מינסרות עצים וטחנות קמח. לעומתן, חלק מיהודי מויסיי התפרנסו ממסחר זעיר של תוצרת חקלאית, עצים, חומרי בניין, כלי עבודה, והיו גם מספר בעלי מכולת. אחרים עבדו כפועלים שכירים בחטיבת עצים או במינסרות העצים וטחנות הקמח. היו גם מספר יהודים אשר החזיקו חלקות אדמה לחקלאות, אבל לרוב הן לא הספיקו לפרנס את משפחותיהם. בין בעלי המלאכה השונים במקום היו חמישה סנדלרים, שני חייטים, שני נפחים, ספר ופרוון. 

בשנת 1900 התגוררו במויסיי 1,095 יהודים בתוך אוכלוסייה כללית של 3,576 תושבים.

תקופת השואה

מויסיי, יחד עם כל צפון טרנסילבניה, סופחה להונגריה באוגוסט 1940. במפקד אוכלוסין שנערך בשנה זאת נמנו במויסיי 1,067 יהודים שהיוו 19% מכלל האוכלסיה. מספר זה היה נמוך בכ-25% ממספר היהודים במויסיי בשנת 1920, אז התגוררו במקום 1,356 יהודים שהיוו 28% מכלל התושבים. בזמן השלטון ההונגרי התחילה רדיפת היהודים. במויסיי האוכלוסייה הרומנית המקומית גילתה אהדה רבה כלפי יהודי המקום, בגלל שנאתם אל השלטון ההונגרי וגם כתוצאה מעידודו של הכומר המקומי שהיה אוהד ישראל. בשנת 1942 כל הגברים היהודים בגיל 20 - 42 גויסו בכח אל גדודי עבודות הכפייה של ההונגרים ונשלחו לשטחים הכבושים ע"י הכוחות הגרמניים וההונגרים באוקראינה הסובייטית, שם נספו מרביתם.

לאחר השתלטותם של הגרמנים על הונגריה באביב 1944, רוכזו כל יהודי מויסיי בגטו שהוקם בווישאו-דה-סוס הסמוכה. הכפרים המקומיים העמידו לרשות היהודים את העגלות שלהם כדי שלא יצטרכו ללכת ברגל מרחק של 12 ק"מ. יהודי מויסיי נשלחו אל מחנה המוות הנאצי באושוויץ ביחד עם כל תושבי הגטו בווישאו-דה-סוס - סה"כ 3,032 יהודים - ב-19 במאי 1944.

אחרי השואה

בתום מלחמת העולם השנייה חזרו כ-180 ניצולים יהודים למויסיי. מספר זה כלל את אלה ששרדו את מחנות המוות הנאציים ואת עבודות הכפייה של ההונגרים. בין השורדים לא חזרה אף לא משפחה אחת, אלא רק אנשים בודדים. כמו כן, כמעט אף ילד צעיר מגיל 18 לא שרד. התושבים המקומיים קיבלו אותם ברגשות מעורבים, חלקם אף הופתעו שלא כל היהודים נספו בשואה, אחרים קיוו להשתלט על הרכוש היהודי שנשאר במקום. השבים מן השואה ניסו להקים את הקהילה מחדש, שיפצו את בית הכנסת ובנו מקווה טהרה. יהודי מויסיי הזמינו אליהם לשבתות את הרב הצדיק מסקולן אשר ישב דרך קבע בבוקרשט.

למרות המאמצים להחיות את חיי הקהילה במויסיי, רוב היהודים הרגישו די מהר שאין להם עתיד במקום זה. אחרי הקמת מדינת ישראל ומצד השני התבססות המשטר הקומוניסטי ברומניה, כולם עזבו את המקום בתוך מספר שנים. רובם עלו לישראל, חלק השתתפו במלחמת העצמאות בתש"ח, שבה נפלו שנים מילידי מויסיי.

Borsa
 

Romanian: Borşa; Hungarian: Borsa; Yiddish: בורשא (Borsha); German: Borscha

A mountain town in northern Transylvania, Maramures region, Romania. Within Hungary before 1918 and from 1940 to 1945.

 

21st Century

Today there are no longer Jews in Borsa.

 

History

The first Jewish presence noted in Borsa is from 1728 when immigrants from Galicia and Bucovina settled in the area.

The 1768 census of Jews from the region of Maramures recorded only two families in Borsa, but by the beginning of the nineteenth century the number of Jews had reached 250 and continued to increase.

The first synagogue was founded in 1783 and a burial society was set up in 1815.

According to local Hasidic legend, Rabbi Israel ben Eliezer, known as the Ba'al Shem Tov, once visited Borsa, and Hasidism was strong in the town.

Synagogues were built in 1840 and 1890. A Talmud torah was established in 1869 with six teachers and 120 students.  The statutes of the Jewish community were adopted in 1871, a women’s organization was set up in 1908, and a charity association created in 1918.

The Jews of  Borsa engaged in agriculture, forestry, and lumbering as manual laborers; there were also some prosperous Jews who owned lumber mills and woodworking plants.

In 1891, the community numbered 1,432 out of 6,219, (23 per cent of the total population); in 1910 1,972 out of 9,332 (21.1 per cent of the total population); and in 1930 2,486 out of 11,230  (22.1 per cent of the total population).

 In the 1930’s the Jewish community numbered three timber producers who owned frame saws, three owners of substantial forests, four prominent merchants, 80 salesmen, 30 craftsmen, 25 clerks, 10 teachers, 1 physician, 100 farmers, and 150 laborers.

During World War I, one of Borsa’s synagogues was damaged by German soldiers. With the growth of anti-Semitism during the interwar period, the Jews of Borsa became the victims of persecution and acts of violence. On July 4, 1930, members of the Iron Guard, a Romanian fascist paramilitary group, with the help of local priests and teachers, set a fire that destroyed the homes of 132 Jewish families.

 

The Holocaust

In September 1940, Borsa was included in the district of northern Transylvania transferred to Hungary.  Jews became subject to the anti-Jewish laws already in effect in Hungary. Jewish males of military age were conscripted for forced labor, many Jewish stores were shut down, and Jews were refused business permits.

In April 1944, there were 2,238 Jews living in Borsa. In May 1944, after Hungary was occupied by German troops, the Jews were placed in a local ghetto. Shortly afterward they were transferred together with Jews from other communities to the ghetto of Viseul-de-Sus (Hungarian Feisoviso).  From there they were sent to Auschwitz on transports that took place May 19, May 21, and May 25.

 

Postwar

After World War II survivors returned to Borsa and attempted to rebuild the community.  In 1947 there were 395 Jews living in the town. This number subsequently decreased, with most emigrating to Israel. In the 1970’s only two or three families remained.

A Sefer Zikaron Borsha (Memorial Book of Borsha) was published in Israel in 1985.

Romania

România

A country in eastern Europe, member of the European Union (EU)

21st Century

Estimated Jewish population in 2018: 9,000 out of 19,500,000.  Before the Holocaust Romania was home to the second largest Jewish community in Europe, and the fourth largest in the world, after USSR, USA, and Poland. Main Jewish organization:

Federaţia Comunităţilor Evreieşti Din România - Federation of Jewish Communities in Romania
Str. Sf. Vineri nr. 9-11 sector 3, Bucuresti, Romania
Phone: 021-315.50.90
Fax: 021-313.10.28
Email: secretariat@fcer.ro
Website: www.jewishfed.ro

our Open Databases
Jewish Genealogy
Family Names
Jewish Communities
Visual Documentation
Jewish Music Center
Place
אA
אA
אA
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
The Jewish Community of Breb

Breb

Also known as Brebu; In Hungarian: Bréb

A village in the Ocna Șugatag (Aknasugatag, in Hungarian) commune in Maramureș county in Transylvania, Romania. Until 1918 it was part of Austria-Hungary. During 1940-1944 it was annexed by Hungary.

Jews started to setlle in this village during the mid-19th century. In 1910 there were 203 Jews in Breb and in 1920, after the place was incorporated into Romania, there were 224 Jews or 14% of the total population. Their number decreased to 159 according to the 1930 census.

In May 1944 the Jews of Breb were taken to the Berbesti ghetto and then to the Ghetto of Sighet. They were eventually deported to Auschwitz Nazi death camp on May 15 - 21, 1944.  

There is a Jewish cemetery, the last burial took place in early 1940s. According to an oral testimony transmitted by members the Sima family, the Romanian inhabitants of the village who owned the land of the Jewish cemetery, when the local Jewish community found out that they would be deported, they buried their religious books within the cemetery boundary.

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People

Romania
Borsa
Moisei
Viseu de Sus
Sighetu Marmației

Romania

România

A country in eastern Europe, member of the European Union (EU)

21st Century

Estimated Jewish population in 2018: 9,000 out of 19,500,000.  Before the Holocaust Romania was home to the second largest Jewish community in Europe, and the fourth largest in the world, after USSR, USA, and Poland. Main Jewish organization:

Federaţia Comunităţilor Evreieşti Din România - Federation of Jewish Communities in Romania
Str. Sf. Vineri nr. 9-11 sector 3, Bucuresti, Romania
Phone: 021-315.50.90
Fax: 021-313.10.28
Email: secretariat@fcer.ro
Website: www.jewishfed.ro

Borsa
 

Romanian: Borşa; Hungarian: Borsa; Yiddish: בורשא (Borsha); German: Borscha

A mountain town in northern Transylvania, Maramures region, Romania. Within Hungary before 1918 and from 1940 to 1945.

 

21st Century

Today there are no longer Jews in Borsa.

 

History

The first Jewish presence noted in Borsa is from 1728 when immigrants from Galicia and Bucovina settled in the area.

The 1768 census of Jews from the region of Maramures recorded only two families in Borsa, but by the beginning of the nineteenth century the number of Jews had reached 250 and continued to increase.

The first synagogue was founded in 1783 and a burial society was set up in 1815.

According to local Hasidic legend, Rabbi Israel ben Eliezer, known as the Ba'al Shem Tov, once visited Borsa, and Hasidism was strong in the town.

Synagogues were built in 1840 and 1890. A Talmud torah was established in 1869 with six teachers and 120 students.  The statutes of the Jewish community were adopted in 1871, a women’s organization was set up in 1908, and a charity association created in 1918.

The Jews of  Borsa engaged in agriculture, forestry, and lumbering as manual laborers; there were also some prosperous Jews who owned lumber mills and woodworking plants.

In 1891, the community numbered 1,432 out of 6,219, (23 per cent of the total population); in 1910 1,972 out of 9,332 (21.1 per cent of the total population); and in 1930 2,486 out of 11,230  (22.1 per cent of the total population).

 In the 1930’s the Jewish community numbered three timber producers who owned frame saws, three owners of substantial forests, four prominent merchants, 80 salesmen, 30 craftsmen, 25 clerks, 10 teachers, 1 physician, 100 farmers, and 150 laborers.

During World War I, one of Borsa’s synagogues was damaged by German soldiers. With the growth of anti-Semitism during the interwar period, the Jews of Borsa became the victims of persecution and acts of violence. On July 4, 1930, members of the Iron Guard, a Romanian fascist paramilitary group, with the help of local priests and teachers, set a fire that destroyed the homes of 132 Jewish families.

 

The Holocaust

In September 1940, Borsa was included in the district of northern Transylvania transferred to Hungary.  Jews became subject to the anti-Jewish laws already in effect in Hungary. Jewish males of military age were conscripted for forced labor, many Jewish stores were shut down, and Jews were refused business permits.

In April 1944, there were 2,238 Jews living in Borsa. In May 1944, after Hungary was occupied by German troops, the Jews were placed in a local ghetto. Shortly afterward they were transferred together with Jews from other communities to the ghetto of Viseul-de-Sus (Hungarian Feisoviso).  From there they were sent to Auschwitz on transports that took place May 19, May 21, and May 25.

 

Postwar

After World War II survivors returned to Borsa and attempted to rebuild the community.  In 1947 there were 395 Jews living in the town. This number subsequently decreased, with most emigrating to Israel. In the 1970’s only two or three families remained.

A Sefer Zikaron Borsha (Memorial Book of Borsha) was published in Israel in 1985.

מויסיי

Moisei 

שמות נוספים: Moișeni, Moiseiu, Moiseu
ביידיש: מאסיף; בהונגרית: Mózesfalu, Majszin, Mojszén; בגרמנית:  Mosesdorf

כפר במחוז מרמורש, רומניה, כ-45 ק"מ דרומית לעיר סיגט, בעמק נהר וישאו, בין הערים וישאו-דה-סוס בצפון מערב והעיר בורשה במזרח. עד תום מלחמת העולם הראשונה חלק מממלכת הונגריה בתוך האימפריה האוסטרו-הונגרית. מחוז מרמורש סופח להונגריה בין השנים 1940 – 1945 וחזר לשליטת רומניה בתום מלחמת העולם השנייה.

תחילת המאה ה-21

במויסיי, שהייתה אחד ממרכזי החיים היהודיים בחבל מרמורש, אין היום תושבים יהודים. במקום קיים  בית קברות יהודי קטן ומטופח באחריותה של הפדרציה של הקהילות היהודיות ברומניה.

היסטוריה

הכפר מוזכר לראשונה בשנת 1213 בשם מויזון (Moyzun) ובתעודה אחרת משנת 1365 מוזכר בשמו הלטיני Villa Moyse . ראשיתה של ההתיישבות היהודית במקום אינה מתועדת, הסברה היא שמהגרים יהודים מגליציה התחילו להתיישב במקום במהלך המאה ה-18.

בשנת 1838 חיו במויסיי 235 יהודים. מספרם גדל ל-419 בשנת 1880.

הקהילה היהודית התארגנה בשנים הראשונות של המאה ה-19. ברוב שנות המאה ה-19 התפילות התקיימו בבית כנסת קטן שנבנה מעץ בתחילת המאה ה-19 ורק בסוף המאה ה-19 הוקם בית כנסת מלבנים. במקום פעלו עוד שני בתי מדרש, אחד הוקם ביוזמתה של "חברת תהילים" והשני הוקם ע"י איציק גרובר, יהודי שהשתייך לאחת המשפחות האמידות במויסיי. מוסדות וארגונים קהילתיים אחרים כללו חברה קדישא ומספר ארגונים לעזרה הדדית, כגון "ביקור חולים" ו"מתן בסתר". רבים מיהודי המקום השתתפו בשיעורי לימוד תורה של חברת לימודי הש"ס. עד סוף המאה ה-19 החיים הדתיים במויסיי התקיימו ללא נוכחות קבועה של רב. מבחינה מינהלית, הקהילה השתייכה לרבנות של העיר וישאו-דה-סוס הסמוכה למויסיי. בדיון משפטי שנערך בין קהילת מויסיי וקהילת וישאו-דה-סוס משנת 1894, טענו יהודי מויסיי שכבר לפני שנתיים החליטו שלא להכיר יותר בסמכותה של הרבנות בווישאו-דה-סוס.

קהילת מויסיי הצטיינה בלומדי התורה שלה. אברהם חיים איינהורן, מתושבי מויסיי, חיבר ספרים העוסקים בהלכה מעשית: "ברכת הבית" (יצא לאור בסיגט, בשנת תרנ"ב / 1892), "מקור הברכה", שהוא תרגום ליידיש של "ברכת הבית" (יצא לאור בעיר מונקץ' בשנת תרנ"ח / 1898), "עצי העולה", חיבור העוסק בהסבר ל"שולחן ערוך" (פורסם בשני חלקים בסיגט בשנים תרנ"ז - תרנ"ח / 1897 - 1898) ו"שערי טוהר" העוסק בהלכות נידה ומקוואות (פורסם בפאקש, תרס"א / 1900). תלמיד חכם נוסף מתושבי מויסיי היה צבי הירש רוזנברג (1850 - 1935) המכונה "הרב", מנהל חשבונות במקצועו אשר הועסק בחברה של האחים הרשטיק כמשגיח על עובדי היער בכריתת עצים. צבי הירש רוזנברג חיבר את הספר "מצוות שבת" (סיגט, תר"פ / 1920). בשנים שבין שתי מלחמות העולם כיהן במקום הרב משה מאיר וידמן, אשר נפטר לפני השואה. במקומו לא מונה רב אחר, אבל יצחק בעק שימש כמורה-הוראה. הוא נספה בשואה.

פרנסתם של יהודי מויסיי הייתה מבוססת על החקלאות המקומית. משפחות גרובר, הרשטיק, פוקס וקינד נמנו עם עשירי המקום. בבעלותן היו קרקעות חקלאיות ושטחי יער נרחבים, מינסרות עצים וטחנות קמח. לעומתן, חלק מיהודי מויסיי התפרנסו ממסחר זעיר של תוצרת חקלאית, עצים, חומרי בניין, כלי עבודה, והיו גם מספר בעלי מכולת. אחרים עבדו כפועלים שכירים בחטיבת עצים או במינסרות העצים וטחנות הקמח. היו גם מספר יהודים אשר החזיקו חלקות אדמה לחקלאות, אבל לרוב הן לא הספיקו לפרנס את משפחותיהם. בין בעלי המלאכה השונים במקום היו חמישה סנדלרים, שני חייטים, שני נפחים, ספר ופרוון. 

בשנת 1900 התגוררו במויסיי 1,095 יהודים בתוך אוכלוסייה כללית של 3,576 תושבים.

תקופת השואה

מויסיי, יחד עם כל צפון טרנסילבניה, סופחה להונגריה באוגוסט 1940. במפקד אוכלוסין שנערך בשנה זאת נמנו במויסיי 1,067 יהודים שהיוו 19% מכלל האוכלסיה. מספר זה היה נמוך בכ-25% ממספר היהודים במויסיי בשנת 1920, אז התגוררו במקום 1,356 יהודים שהיוו 28% מכלל התושבים. בזמן השלטון ההונגרי התחילה רדיפת היהודים. במויסיי האוכלוסייה הרומנית המקומית גילתה אהדה רבה כלפי יהודי המקום, בגלל שנאתם אל השלטון ההונגרי וגם כתוצאה מעידודו של הכומר המקומי שהיה אוהד ישראל. בשנת 1942 כל הגברים היהודים בגיל 20 - 42 גויסו בכח אל גדודי עבודות הכפייה של ההונגרים ונשלחו לשטחים הכבושים ע"י הכוחות הגרמניים וההונגרים באוקראינה הסובייטית, שם נספו מרביתם.

לאחר השתלטותם של הגרמנים על הונגריה באביב 1944, רוכזו כל יהודי מויסיי בגטו שהוקם בווישאו-דה-סוס הסמוכה. הכפרים המקומיים העמידו לרשות היהודים את העגלות שלהם כדי שלא יצטרכו ללכת ברגל מרחק של 12 ק"מ. יהודי מויסיי נשלחו אל מחנה המוות הנאצי באושוויץ ביחד עם כל תושבי הגטו בווישאו-דה-סוס - סה"כ 3,032 יהודים - ב-19 במאי 1944.

אחרי השואה

בתום מלחמת העולם השנייה חזרו כ-180 ניצולים יהודים למויסיי. מספר זה כלל את אלה ששרדו את מחנות המוות הנאציים ואת עבודות הכפייה של ההונגרים. בין השורדים לא חזרה אף לא משפחה אחת, אלא רק אנשים בודדים. כמו כן, כמעט אף ילד צעיר מגיל 18 לא שרד. התושבים המקומיים קיבלו אותם ברגשות מעורבים, חלקם אף הופתעו שלא כל היהודים נספו בשואה, אחרים קיוו להשתלט על הרכוש היהודי שנשאר במקום. השבים מן השואה ניסו להקים את הקהילה מחדש, שיפצו את בית הכנסת ובנו מקווה טהרה. יהודי מויסיי הזמינו אליהם לשבתות את הרב הצדיק מסקולן אשר ישב דרך קבע בבוקרשט.

למרות המאמצים להחיות את חיי הקהילה במויסיי, רוב היהודים הרגישו די מהר שאין להם עתיד במקום זה. אחרי הקמת מדינת ישראל ומצד השני התבססות המשטר הקומוניסטי ברומניה, כולם עזבו את המקום בתוך מספר שנים. רובם עלו לישראל, חלק השתתפו במלחמת העצמאות בתש"ח, שבה נפלו שנים מילידי מויסיי.

Viseu de Sus

Hung. Felsoviso; referred to by the Jews as Oybervisha

A town in north Transylvania, Maramures region, Romania.

Until the end of World War I and between 1940 and 1944 in Hungary.

The Jewish community in Viseu de Sus was organized in 1877, although Jews had already been living there for a long time. The Jewish population developed rapidly during the 1880s. In 1885 the community was designated as the Jewish center for the three villages of Felsoviso, Alsoviso (Viseul de Jos), and Kozepviso, and later for a number of other villages. The chevra kaddisha (burial society) was established in 1895. The community was orthodox and chasidism wielded a powerful influence.

There were four synagogues, a number of additional prayer houses, and a yeshivah. In the main, the occupations of the Jews were connected with the forests and the wood industry of the town and its environs. In 1896 a Hebrew press was established; as it was the only press in the town it also printed works in other languages. The Hebrew religious periodical Degel Ha-Torah was printed there from 1922 and ran to about 80 issues. In 1930 there were 3, 734 Jews (33. 7% of the total population) in Viseu de Sus. About the same number of Jews lived there in the spring of 1944, when the fascist Hungarian authorities set up a ghetto in which Jews from the surrounding villages were also concentrated.

It is estimated that about 35,000 Jews passed through this ghetto on their way to Auschwitz. After World War II about 700 Jews returned to the town. Their numbers declined through emigration and by 1971 the Jewish community had ceased to exist.

Known as Sighet until 1964 (in spite of the name change, the city will be referred to as “Sighet” throughout this article, since it is the name that is more familiar to Jews)

Hungarian: Máramarossziget

Yiddish: סיגעט‎, Siget

A city in Romania

Before World War I (1914-1918), and between 1940 and 1944, Sighet was part of Hungary.

 

21ST CENTURY

In 2002 Elie Wiesel made an official visit to Sighet, where he opened a Jewish museum. Wiesel spoke about the Jewish community that once existed in the city, as well as the need for the Romanians to acknowledge their own complicity in the murder of the country’s Jews during the Holocaust.

A commemoration was held in May 2014 to mark the 70th anniversary since the deportation of the Jews of Sighet. Events included Shabbat services in the synagogue; a memorial service at the local Holocaust monument, marking the location where the deportations took place; as well as a klezmer concert. Tours of the Jewish cemetery were also offered.

Wiesel’s childhood home was vandalized and defaced with anti-Semitic graffiti in August of 2018.

 

HISTORY

Jews had settled in Sighet by the 17th century. They began to be taxed in 1728. In 1746 there were ten Jewish families (39 people) living in Sighet.

Most of Sighet’s Jews were traditional, and many were heavily influenced by the Chassidic movement. There were also those who became adherents of the Frankists, followers of the false messiah Jacob Frank.  

An organized community existed during the second half of the 18th century. During this period, Tzvi b. Moses Abraham (d. 1771) from Galicia, served as the community’s rabbi, and proved to be a determined opponent of the Frankist movement. Other rabbis to serve Sighet’s Jewish community included Judah HaKohen Heller, who served until his death in 1819; and the Chassidic rabbi Chananiah Yom Tov Lipa Teitelbaum (1883-1904).

In 1746 Sighet was home to 39 Jews (10 families). By the late 1780s that number had grown to 142. In 1831 the local Jewish population numbered 431. The Jewish population increased rapidly during the second half of the 19th century, and by 1891 the Jewish population reached 4,960 (about 30% of the total population).

The Sighet community joined the organization of Hungarian Orthodox communities in 1883, but this led to considerable dispute within the community, and the more liberal Jews founded a Sephardic community. Beginning in 1906 Dr. Samuel Danzig (b. 1878) served as that new community’s rabbi; he ultimately perished in the Holocaust. The Orthodox community’s last rabbi was Jekuthiel Judah Teitelbaum, who also died in the Holocaust.

Community institutions included yeshivas, Jewish schools, Zionist organizations, and Hebrew printing presses and libraries, including the Israel Weiss library. There were a number of newspapers that were published in Hebrew, Yiddish, and Hungarian. The majority of Jews in the district were quite impoverished.

In 1910 Sighet’s Jewish population was 7,981 (34% of the total population). By 1930 it had grown to 10,609 (about 38% of the total population). The Jewish population was 10,144 in 1941 (39% of the total population), the highest proportion of Jews in any Hungarian town.

Notable members of Sighet’s Jewish community included the Yiddish author Herzl Apsan (1886-1944); the humorist, editor, and author, Hirsch Leib Gottleib (1829-1930); the rabbi and historian Judah Jekuthiel Gruenwald (1889-1955); the important Yiddish writer Joseph Holder (1893-1944); the violinist Joseph Szigeti (1892-1973); the Yiddish author J. Ring; and the pianist Geza Frid. However, perhaps the best-known native of Sighet is the author and Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel (1928-2016), who wrote about Jewish life in Sighet, as well as his experiences during the Holocaust, in his famous book, Night.

 

THE HOLOCAUST

After the annexation of northern Transylvania by Hungary in 1940, the authorities began to curtail the economic activity of the Jews in Sighet.

Men of military age were conscripted for forced labor in 1942. Later, in the summer of 1944, a ghetto was set up by the Hungarian and Nazi authorities. From there, about 12,000 Jews were deported to concentration and extermination camps.

 

POSTWAR

In 1947 a Jewish community of about 2,300 was formed by returning survivors and Jews from other areas who came to Sighet. However, the vast majority eventually immigrated, and by 1970 there were only about 250 Jews remaining in the city.

In 1959 the organization of Sighet Jews living in Israel began publication of Maramarossziget, a periodical in Hebrew, Yiddish, and Hungarian about the history of the Jews in Sighet and the district of Maramures.