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URBACH Origin of surname

URBACH, Orbach

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a toponymic (derived from a geographic name of a town, city, region or country). Surnames that are based on place names do not always testify to direct origin from that place, but may indicate an indirect relation between the name-bearer or his ancestors and the place, such as birth place, temporary residence, trade, or family-relatives.

The surname Urbach is associated with several villages called Auerbach in Hesse or Auerpach in the Oberpfalz (Germany).

Jewish family names based on these villages developed into Polish variants like Urbach and Orbach, Russian forms comprising Awerbach, Awerbuch and Averbakh, and were sometimes abbreviated to Auer and Oer.

Auerbach is documented as a Jewish family name in the 15th century.

Distinguished bearers of the Jewish family name Urbach include the 20th century Prague-born American physician, Erich Urbach, an allergy and dermatology expert, and the 20th century Israeli researcher in talmudic and rabbinical literature, Ephraim Elimelech Urbach, a co-founder of the movement for Torah Judaism.

Distinguished 20th century bearers of the Jewish family name Orbach include the British politician and communal leader, Maurice Orbach, a member of parliament.
ID Number:
201509
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Hinko Urbah (born Heinrich Urbach) (1872-1960), rabbi, born in Morávka, Czech Republic (then part of Austria-Hungary). He was educated at a traditional heder and then attended high school in Budapest until 1891. Urbah studied at the yeshiva in Bratislava (now in Slovakia), where he worked as an educator until 1898. At the same time, he studied comparative philosophies of Semitic languages at the University of Budapest and earned a PhD in 1904. Urbah served as a rabbi in Tuzla in Bosnia, from 1906 to 1911, in Zemun in Serbia (then part of the newly established Yugoslavia), from 1911 to 1928, and then in Sarajevo, from 1928 to 1946.  He was a lecturer at the Theological Institute, that was opened in Sarajevo in 1938. After the invasion of Yugoslavia by the Axis Powers in 1941 and the establishment of the Fascist regime in Croatia, he fled to Italy, and at the end of 1943 managed to cross the border to Switzerland. After WW II, he returned to Sarajevo in 1945, and one year later he moved to Zagreb. Urbah, a supporter of the Zionist movement since he was a student, was instrumental in assisting the emigration of Yugoslav Jews to Israel in late 1940s. Eventually, he immigrated himself to Israel bringing with him eighty Torah scrolls from abandoned synagogues in Yugoslavia. He spent his last years in Jerusalem and died in Paris, France.  

Urbach

A village in the district of Neuwied, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany.

First Jewish presence: 1767; peak Jewish population: 39 in 1852; Jewish population in 1933: approximately 26

According to records, two Jewish families lived in Urbach in 1767. The Urbach Jewish community, established in 1813 and with which the Jews of Raubach and Daufenbach were affiliated, belonged to the regional community of Neuwied in 1857. Later, the Jews of Urbach were affiliated with the Puderbach community. In 1823, local Jews conducted services in a 30-square meter prayer room; although we do not know if this was the same prayer room used in 1856, records do tell us that the room, located that year in a private residence, contained 48 seats. We also know that the community established a synagogue at some point during the years 1900 to 1914, and that burials were conducted in Dierdorf and, after 1898, in Puderbach. Urbach’s Jewish schoolchildren studied religion in Dierdorf. In 1933, approximately 26 Jews lived in Urbach. Although Urbach Jews were forcibly moved to Puderbach before November 1938, the synagogue was nevertheless set on fire on Pogrom Night (Nov. 9, 1938). (Only its velvet curtains could be saved.) At least eight Urbach Jews perished in the Shoah. In March 1942, a native Urbach Jew was deported to Izbica from the Bendorf Syn institution for the mentally disabled. A bank was later built on the former synagogue site.

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This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.

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URBACH Origin of surname
URBACH, Orbach

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a toponymic (derived from a geographic name of a town, city, region or country). Surnames that are based on place names do not always testify to direct origin from that place, but may indicate an indirect relation between the name-bearer or his ancestors and the place, such as birth place, temporary residence, trade, or family-relatives.

The surname Urbach is associated with several villages called Auerbach in Hesse or Auerpach in the Oberpfalz (Germany).

Jewish family names based on these villages developed into Polish variants like Urbach and Orbach, Russian forms comprising Awerbach, Awerbuch and Averbakh, and were sometimes abbreviated to Auer and Oer.

Auerbach is documented as a Jewish family name in the 15th century.

Distinguished bearers of the Jewish family name Urbach include the 20th century Prague-born American physician, Erich Urbach, an allergy and dermatology expert, and the 20th century Israeli researcher in talmudic and rabbinical literature, Ephraim Elimelech Urbach, a co-founder of the movement for Torah Judaism.

Distinguished 20th century bearers of the Jewish family name Orbach include the British politician and communal leader, Maurice Orbach, a member of parliament.
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People

Urbach

Urbach

A village in the district of Neuwied, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany.

First Jewish presence: 1767; peak Jewish population: 39 in 1852; Jewish population in 1933: approximately 26

According to records, two Jewish families lived in Urbach in 1767. The Urbach Jewish community, established in 1813 and with which the Jews of Raubach and Daufenbach were affiliated, belonged to the regional community of Neuwied in 1857. Later, the Jews of Urbach were affiliated with the Puderbach community. In 1823, local Jews conducted services in a 30-square meter prayer room; although we do not know if this was the same prayer room used in 1856, records do tell us that the room, located that year in a private residence, contained 48 seats. We also know that the community established a synagogue at some point during the years 1900 to 1914, and that burials were conducted in Dierdorf and, after 1898, in Puderbach. Urbach’s Jewish schoolchildren studied religion in Dierdorf. In 1933, approximately 26 Jews lived in Urbach. Although Urbach Jews were forcibly moved to Puderbach before November 1938, the synagogue was nevertheless set on fire on Pogrom Night (Nov. 9, 1938). (Only its velvet curtains could be saved.) At least eight Urbach Jews perished in the Shoah. In March 1942, a native Urbach Jew was deported to Izbica from the Bendorf Syn institution for the mentally disabled. A bank was later built on the former synagogue site.

------------------------------------------

This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.

Hinko Urbah

Hinko Urbah (born Heinrich Urbach) (1872-1960), rabbi, born in Morávka, Czech Republic (then part of Austria-Hungary). He was educated at a traditional heder and then attended high school in Budapest until 1891. Urbah studied at the yeshiva in Bratislava (now in Slovakia), where he worked as an educator until 1898. At the same time, he studied comparative philosophies of Semitic languages at the University of Budapest and earned a PhD in 1904. Urbah served as a rabbi in Tuzla in Bosnia, from 1906 to 1911, in Zemun in Serbia (then part of the newly established Yugoslavia), from 1911 to 1928, and then in Sarajevo, from 1928 to 1946.  He was a lecturer at the Theological Institute, that was opened in Sarajevo in 1938. After the invasion of Yugoslavia by the Axis Powers in 1941 and the establishment of the Fascist regime in Croatia, he fled to Italy, and at the end of 1943 managed to cross the border to Switzerland. After WW II, he returned to Sarajevo in 1945, and one year later he moved to Zagreb. Urbah, a supporter of the Zionist movement since he was a student, was instrumental in assisting the emigration of Yugoslav Jews to Israel in late 1940s. Eventually, he immigrated himself to Israel bringing with him eighty Torah scrolls from abandoned synagogues in Yugoslavia. He spent his last years in Jerusalem and died in Paris, France.