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The Jewish Community of Nis

Serbian: Ниш, Niš

A city in Serbia

 

21ST CENTURY

A small number of Serbia’s 3,000 Jews live in Nis.

The synagogue building has been preserved and became an exhibition space of the Nis National Museum.

The Jewish cemetery, which probably dates back to the 18th century, has a number of tombstone fragments scattered around the area. One-third of the cemetery is occupied by a Roma settlement (Mahala).

A Holocaust memorial is located on Bubanj Hill, where over 1,100 Jews from NIS (and more than 10,000 people total) were killed during World War II (1939-1945).

 

HISTORY

There were already Jews living in Nis during the 16th century.

In 1903 the town's Jewish population numbered 800. Most worked in the textile trade and in money changing, while a few worked as manual laborers.

The synagogue was rebuilt in 1925, after it burned down in 1879.

In 1925 there were 430 Jews living in Nis.

 

THE HOLOCAUST

Serbia was occupied by Germany, which enacted its extermination policies against the Jews and other “undesirable” groups under the auspices of the puppet government of Milan Nedic. By May 1942 Serbia was declared “Judenfrei.”  

In October 1941, the Jewish men were imprisoned in the Red Cross camp located in Nis. Several inmates escaped from the camp in February 1942 after attacking the guards. Several hundred prisoners, most of whom were Jews, were shot in retaliation. Two days later, more than 1,000 Jews were shot.

In the spring of 1942 the women and children were arrested. After a few days in the Red Cross camp they were sent to the Sajmiste concentration camp.

 

POSTWAR

In 1952 there were 25 Jews living in Nis.

 

Place Type:
City
ID Number:
195057
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
The Jewish Community of Nis

Serbian: Ниш, Niš

A city in Serbia

 

21ST CENTURY

A small number of Serbia’s 3,000 Jews live in Nis.

The synagogue building has been preserved and became an exhibition space of the Nis National Museum.

The Jewish cemetery, which probably dates back to the 18th century, has a number of tombstone fragments scattered around the area. One-third of the cemetery is occupied by a Roma settlement (Mahala).

A Holocaust memorial is located on Bubanj Hill, where over 1,100 Jews from NIS (and more than 10,000 people total) were killed during World War II (1939-1945).

 

HISTORY

There were already Jews living in Nis during the 16th century.

In 1903 the town's Jewish population numbered 800. Most worked in the textile trade and in money changing, while a few worked as manual laborers.

The synagogue was rebuilt in 1925, after it burned down in 1879.

In 1925 there were 430 Jews living in Nis.

 

THE HOLOCAUST

Serbia was occupied by Germany, which enacted its extermination policies against the Jews and other “undesirable” groups under the auspices of the puppet government of Milan Nedic. By May 1942 Serbia was declared “Judenfrei.”  

In October 1941, the Jewish men were imprisoned in the Red Cross camp located in Nis. Several inmates escaped from the camp in February 1942 after attacking the guards. Several hundred prisoners, most of whom were Jews, were shot in retaliation. Two days later, more than 1,000 Jews were shot.

In the spring of 1942 the women and children were arrested. After a few days in the Red Cross camp they were sent to the Sajmiste concentration camp.

 

POSTWAR

In 1952 there were 25 Jews living in Nis.

 

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People