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The Jewish Community of Barbados

Barbados

An island  country in the Caribbean.

21st Century

Estimated Jewish population in 2018: less than 100 out of 290,000. Main Jewish organization:

Barbados Jewish Community Council
Phone: 1-246 826-6726
Email: Scott@Oranltd.com

 

HISTORY

The first known Jewish settlers were former crypto-Jews who had escaped from Brazil after its reconquest from the Dutch by the Portuguese. In 1655 Abraham de Mercado, formerly an elder of the Recife community, and his son David Raphael, both physicians, were allowed to settle there. Jews were granted protection in 1656 and a community, K. K. Nidhe Israel, was established in Bridgetown; in due course a subsidiary community, K.K. Semah David, was formed at Speightstown on the other side of the island. By 1679 about 300 Jews lived in Barbados, a conversionist movement of little consequence being launched among them by the Quaker George Fox in 1685.
During the 18th century the settlement grew very prosperous, though the Speightstown community came to an end. Raphael Chayyim Isaac Carigal of Hebron served as rabbi of Bridgetown from 1774 until his death in 1777; in 1792 the community had 147 male members. In 1802 all political disabilities were repealed by the local legislature (confirmed by the British parliament in 1820).
With the island's economic decline, the community rapidly dwindled. At the beginning of the 20th century there were fewer than 20 persons left, and in 1925 the last of them died. The former synagogue is now used as the law library. A few Jews have settled in the island in recent years. In 1968 there were about 80 Jews out of a total population of 251,000.

Place Type:
Country
ID Number:
189275
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Nearby places:

Related items:
ENRIQUEZ, ENRIQUES, HENRIQUEZ, HENRIQUES

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from a Gentile, vernacular personal name.

The surname Enriquez is a Spanish patronymic (derived from a male ancestor's personal name) of the name Enrique; the meaning of the name is "son of Enrique". Enriquez is often recorded in conjunction with other Jewish names, for instance Bueno-Enriquez, Gomez-Enriquez, and Gabbay-Enriquez. Such names are largely found among Crypto-Jews from Spain and Portugal, many of whom openly reverted to Judaism after fleeing the Inquisition in the 15th century. A well-known Spanish family called Enriquez had branches in Amsterdam, London, Jamaica, Surinam, Barbados and New York. Henriques is recorded as a Jewish family name with Jacob Cohen Henriques, who arrived in New Amsterdam/New York in 1655. In the 18th century Henriquez is recorded as a Jewish family name in Tunis, with Isaac Israel Henriquez, mentioned in a document of the French consulate in Tunis dated January 31, 1703. Enriques is recorded on a 'ketubbah' from Tunis dated September 7, 1791, of Gracia, daughter of Isaac Enriques and her husband Elie, son of Isaac Hay Lumbroso. In the 19th century, Enriquez is recorded with Joseph Enriquez (died 1839), who was head of Beth-Din ("rabbinical court") and chief rabbi of the Grana Jewish community in Tunis (Jews from Livorno, Italy, who settled in Tunis since the 16th century) in the years 1825 -1839. The name is also recorded in a list of Jewish families from Tuscany, Italy, settled in Tunis in 1848, and with Abraham Enriquez from Italy, whose name is recorded in a list of commercial enterprises established in Tunis in 1865.

Distinguished bearers of Jewish family names in this group include the Anglo-Jewish reformer, David Quixano Henriques (1804-1870), who was director of the city Bank in London and the Bank of Australia, and a co-founder of the Portuguese synagogue in London and of the west London Synagogue; and Jacob Quixano Enriques (1811-1898), an East Indian businessman who founded the Jewish school in Jamaica.
Interior of the Old Syangogue in Bridgetown,
Barbados, 1927
The synagogue was built in 1654
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of the Jewish Community of Barbados)
Tombstone in the Jewish Cemetery in Bridgetown,
Barbados, 1980
The cemetery is one of the oldest in the New World. The first Jews arrived in Barbados in 1628.
Photo: Micha Bar-Am, Israel
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of Mordechai Arbell, Israel)
The old Synagogue in Bridgetown )built in 1654),
Barbados, 1927
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of the Jewish community of Barbados)
"Synagogue Lane" in Barbados, 1980
The name remains but the synagogue no longer exists.
Photo: Micha Bar-Am, Israel
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot, courtesy of Mordechai Arbell, Israel)
Entrance and wall of the Jewish Cemetery in Bridgetown,
Barbados, 1980
This is one of the oldest in the New World. The first Jews in
Barbados arrived in 1628.
Photo: Micha Bar-Am, Israel
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of Mordechai Arbell, Israel)
CEMETERY IN THE CENTER OF BRIDGETOWN,
BARBADOS, 1980.
TO THE LEFT, "NIDHE ISRAEL" SYNAGOGUE
WHICH WAS SOLD IN 1928 AND IS USED
FOR WORKSHOPS.
PHOTO: MICHA BAR-AM, TEL AVIV.
(BETH HATEFUTSOTH PHOTO ARCHIVE,
COURTESY OF MORDECHAI ARBELL, ISRAEL)
Old map of Barbados
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of Mordechai Arbell, Israel)
Promenade of the town of Speightstown, Barbados, 1980. The Jews left after anti-Jewish riots in 1739
Photo: Micha Bar-Am, Tel Aviv
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot, courtesy of Mordechai Arbell, Israel)
Marble bowl for washing hands which stood at the
entrance of the Jewish cemetery in Bridgetown,
Barbados, 1980
It is now located at the entrance to the National Museum
in the city
Photo: Micha Bar-Am, Israel
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of Mordechai Arbell, Israel)

Caribbean

A region of the Americas that consists of a number of islands surrounded by the Caribbean Sea. 

Bridgetown

A city and the capital of Barbados.

Speightstown 

Speightstown, also known as Little Bristol, is the second largest town of Barbados.

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The Jewish Community of Barbados

Barbados

An island  country in the Caribbean.

21st Century

Estimated Jewish population in 2018: less than 100 out of 290,000. Main Jewish organization:

Barbados Jewish Community Council
Phone: 1-246 826-6726
Email: Scott@Oranltd.com

 

HISTORY

The first known Jewish settlers were former crypto-Jews who had escaped from Brazil after its reconquest from the Dutch by the Portuguese. In 1655 Abraham de Mercado, formerly an elder of the Recife community, and his son David Raphael, both physicians, were allowed to settle there. Jews were granted protection in 1656 and a community, K. K. Nidhe Israel, was established in Bridgetown; in due course a subsidiary community, K.K. Semah David, was formed at Speightstown on the other side of the island. By 1679 about 300 Jews lived in Barbados, a conversionist movement of little consequence being launched among them by the Quaker George Fox in 1685.
During the 18th century the settlement grew very prosperous, though the Speightstown community came to an end. Raphael Chayyim Isaac Carigal of Hebron served as rabbi of Bridgetown from 1774 until his death in 1777; in 1792 the community had 147 male members. In 1802 all political disabilities were repealed by the local legislature (confirmed by the British parliament in 1820).
With the island's economic decline, the community rapidly dwindled. At the beginning of the 20th century there were fewer than 20 persons left, and in 1925 the last of them died. The former synagogue is now used as the law library. A few Jews have settled in the island in recent years. In 1968 there were about 80 Jews out of a total population of 251,000.

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People

Speightstown
Bridgetown, Barbados
Caribbean

Speightstown 

Speightstown, also known as Little Bristol, is the second largest town of Barbados.

Bridgetown

A city and the capital of Barbados.

Caribbean

A region of the Americas that consists of a number of islands surrounded by the Caribbean Sea. 

Bowl to wash the hands from the Jewish Cemetery, Barbados, 1980
The Promenade in Speightstown, Barbados, 1980
Old Map of Barbados
Cemetery in the Center of Bridgetown, Barbados, 1980
Entrance to the Jewish Cemetery in Bridgetown, Barbados, 1980
"Synagogue Lane" in Barbados, 1980
The old Synagogue in Bridgetown (built in 1654), Barbados, 1927
Tombstone in the Jewish Cemetery in Bridgetown, Barbados, 1980
Interior of the Old Syangogue in Bridgetown, Barbados, 1927
Marble bowl for washing hands which stood at the
entrance of the Jewish cemetery in Bridgetown,
Barbados, 1980
It is now located at the entrance to the National Museum
in the city
Photo: Micha Bar-Am, Israel
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of Mordechai Arbell, Israel)
Promenade of the town of Speightstown, Barbados, 1980. The Jews left after anti-Jewish riots in 1739
Photo: Micha Bar-Am, Tel Aviv
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot, courtesy of Mordechai Arbell, Israel)
Old map of Barbados
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of Mordechai Arbell, Israel)
CEMETERY IN THE CENTER OF BRIDGETOWN,
BARBADOS, 1980.
TO THE LEFT, "NIDHE ISRAEL" SYNAGOGUE
WHICH WAS SOLD IN 1928 AND IS USED
FOR WORKSHOPS.
PHOTO: MICHA BAR-AM, TEL AVIV.
(BETH HATEFUTSOTH PHOTO ARCHIVE,
COURTESY OF MORDECHAI ARBELL, ISRAEL)
Entrance and wall of the Jewish Cemetery in Bridgetown,
Barbados, 1980
This is one of the oldest in the New World. The first Jews in
Barbados arrived in 1628.
Photo: Micha Bar-Am, Israel
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of Mordechai Arbell, Israel)
"Synagogue Lane" in Barbados, 1980
The name remains but the synagogue no longer exists.
Photo: Micha Bar-Am, Israel
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot, courtesy of Mordechai Arbell, Israel)
The old Synagogue in Bridgetown )built in 1654),
Barbados, 1927
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of the Jewish community of Barbados)
Tombstone in the Jewish Cemetery in Bridgetown,
Barbados, 1980
The cemetery is one of the oldest in the New World. The first Jews arrived in Barbados in 1628.
Photo: Micha Bar-Am, Israel
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of Mordechai Arbell, Israel)
Interior of the Old Syangogue in Bridgetown,
Barbados, 1927
The synagogue was built in 1654
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of the Jewish Community of Barbados)
ENRIQUEZ
ENRIQUEZ, ENRIQUES, HENRIQUEZ, HENRIQUES

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from a Gentile, vernacular personal name.

The surname Enriquez is a Spanish patronymic (derived from a male ancestor's personal name) of the name Enrique; the meaning of the name is "son of Enrique". Enriquez is often recorded in conjunction with other Jewish names, for instance Bueno-Enriquez, Gomez-Enriquez, and Gabbay-Enriquez. Such names are largely found among Crypto-Jews from Spain and Portugal, many of whom openly reverted to Judaism after fleeing the Inquisition in the 15th century. A well-known Spanish family called Enriquez had branches in Amsterdam, London, Jamaica, Surinam, Barbados and New York. Henriques is recorded as a Jewish family name with Jacob Cohen Henriques, who arrived in New Amsterdam/New York in 1655. In the 18th century Henriquez is recorded as a Jewish family name in Tunis, with Isaac Israel Henriquez, mentioned in a document of the French consulate in Tunis dated January 31, 1703. Enriques is recorded on a 'ketubbah' from Tunis dated September 7, 1791, of Gracia, daughter of Isaac Enriques and her husband Elie, son of Isaac Hay Lumbroso. In the 19th century, Enriquez is recorded with Joseph Enriquez (died 1839), who was head of Beth-Din ("rabbinical court") and chief rabbi of the Grana Jewish community in Tunis (Jews from Livorno, Italy, who settled in Tunis since the 16th century) in the years 1825 -1839. The name is also recorded in a list of Jewish families from Tuscany, Italy, settled in Tunis in 1848, and with Abraham Enriquez from Italy, whose name is recorded in a list of commercial enterprises established in Tunis in 1865.

Distinguished bearers of Jewish family names in this group include the Anglo-Jewish reformer, David Quixano Henriques (1804-1870), who was director of the city Bank in London and the Bank of Australia, and a co-founder of the Portuguese synagogue in London and of the west London Synagogue; and Jacob Quixano Enriques (1811-1898), an East Indian businessman who founded the Jewish school in Jamaica.