Search
Print
Share
Your Selected Item:
Family Name
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions

PINTO Origin of surname

PINTO, DE PINTO

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a toponymic (derived from a geographic name of a town, city, region or country). Surnames that are based on place names do not always testify to direct origin from that place, but may indicate an indirect relation between the name-bearer or his ancestors and the place, such as birth place, temporary residence, trade, or family-relatives.

The family name Pinto is associated with several localities called Pinto in Spain and Portugal. Pinto is documented as a Jewish family name in 16th century Italy and Syria. De Pinto is recorded in 18th century Holland. In the 19th century, Pinto is recorded as a Jewish name in a list dated 1848 of Jews from Tuscany who settled in Tunis the name is also recorded in a 'ketubbah' from Tunis dated December 6, 1869, of David, son of Pinhas Pinto, and his wife Bethsabee (Adele), daughter of Emmanuel Hay Cariglio. The name is also recorded as a Jewish family name in the following examples: in the 17th century, the talmudist and kabbalist, Josiah Ben Joseph Pinto (1565-1648), lived in Syria; in the 18th century the French-born economist Isaac de Pinto lived in Amsterdam, Holland; the American merchant and translator of prayer books, Isaac Pinto (1720-1791); and the 20th century the name is recorded with the Yugoslav educator, Avram Pinto.

In the 19th century the surname Pinto is recorded in Essaouira, Morocco.
ID Number:
186051
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Nearby places:
Related items:

Rotterdam


City in W. Netherlands.

 

21st Century

The path to the entrance of a former Jewish institution was renovated in 2001.

 

History

After first trying to attract Marranos from Antwerp in 1604, the city of Rotterdam issued a charter in 1610 which promised various privileges, including complete religious freedom. However, this charter was abolished by the municipality two years later and a large number of those Portuguese who had settled meanwhile left for Amsterdam. Nevertheless, a small group remained, opening a synagogue and buying a plot of land to serve as a cemetery. An important reinforcement to the community came in 1647, when the wealthy de Pinto family arrived in Rotterdam and returned to Judaism.

That same year the municipality accorded the Jews the same rights as those obtained in Amsterdam. In Abraham de Pinto's house a synagogue and a yeshivah - the Jesiba de los Pintos - were opened; head of the yeshivah was Josiah Pardo, who also served as chief rabbi of the community (1648-69). In 1669 the yeshivah was transferred to Amsterdam.

From then on it was the de la Penha family, mostly merchants and shipowners, who played the major role in the community, which continued to exist until 1736. An Ashkenazi community was founded in 1660, at first fostered by the Portuguese community. Its first chief rabbi was Judah Loeb from Vilna (c. 1674-c. 1700). The Ashkenazim were in a difficult economic position; as they were not admitted to the guilds, they were mostly petty traders or dealers in old clothes, or they engaged in one of the few permitted crafts. In addition, they were allowed to sell their merchandise in the market until 1 p.m. only. Nevertheless, their number grew steadily. In 1725 a beautiful synagogue was built, which was destroyed during the German bombing of the city in 1940.

Emancipation in 1796 brought important changes, particularly because it put an end to the absolute power of the parnasim in the community. A grave conflict in the community over the powers of the parnasim was settled by the chief rabbi, Levi Hijman from Breslau (1781--1809), who enjoyed great renown as a scholar and was the author of Penei Aryeh.

In the 19th century the community flourished, owing to the growth of Rotterdam's port. The number of Jews increased from 2,104 in 1809 to more than 13,000 in 1940. In addition to several synagogues in different quarters of the city, a second great synagogue, built in 1891, was consecrated in 1939. The economic position of the Jews improved, particularly toward the end of the 19th century, to such an extent that the number of welfare cases decreased from 1,700 in 1873 to 1,600 in 1901 despite the growth of the community. The most important chief rabbis of Rotterdam were Joseph Isaacssohn (1850-71), who settled a conflict between Reform and Orthodox, and Bernhard Loebel Ritter (1885-1928), a leading scholar and a determined opponent of Zionism. In spite of innumerable endeavors to stimulate Jewish life in Rotterdam through a weekly journal, a literary club, and more than 20 other organizations,
assimilation had a serious impact. However, the community extended important help and assistance to refugees from Germany after 1933.

 

The Holocaust Period

In 1940 there were some 13,000 Jews living in Rotterdam (2% of the city's population); 60% of them were engaged in commerce and 20% in industry. With the invasion of Holland, the German bombers destroyed the center including two synagogues and the bet midrash, which contained valuable manuscripts. On September 1, 1941, all Jewish children were expelled from the public schools, and three Jewish elementary schools, a high school, and a school of higher learning were established. Large-scale deportations to the Westerbork concentration camp and from there to Poland began in late July 1942.

 

Postwar

After the war some 800 Jews returned to Rotterdam from concentration camps and hideouts. In 1969 about 1,300 of the 800,000 inhabitants of Rotterdam were Jews. Of these some 800 were members of the Jewish congregation.

Most prewar Jewish institutions, such as the home for the aged, the orphanage, and the hospital, were not reopened; but the central Jewish home for the aged, which until 1942 existed in Gouda, to the northeast of Rotterdam, was reopened in 1950. After services had been held on temporary premises for nine years, a new modern synagogue, with adjoining classrooms, secretariat, and a modern communal center subsidized by the government reconstruction fund for wartime damage, was inaugurated in 1954. The small square in front of it was officially named A. D. N. Davids Square in 1967 after the late chief rabbi, who perished in a concentration camp. Rabbi L. Vorst was communal rabbi from 1931. He was appointed chief rabbi of Rotterdam and district after the war, retiring in 1971. He was succeeded by Rabbi D. Kahn.

our Open Databases
Jewish Genealogy
Family Names
Jewish Communities
Visual Documentation
Jewish Music Center
Family Name
אA
אA
אA
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
PINTO Origin of surname
PINTO, DE PINTO

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a toponymic (derived from a geographic name of a town, city, region or country). Surnames that are based on place names do not always testify to direct origin from that place, but may indicate an indirect relation between the name-bearer or his ancestors and the place, such as birth place, temporary residence, trade, or family-relatives.

The family name Pinto is associated with several localities called Pinto in Spain and Portugal. Pinto is documented as a Jewish family name in 16th century Italy and Syria. De Pinto is recorded in 18th century Holland. In the 19th century, Pinto is recorded as a Jewish name in a list dated 1848 of Jews from Tuscany who settled in Tunis the name is also recorded in a 'ketubbah' from Tunis dated December 6, 1869, of David, son of Pinhas Pinto, and his wife Bethsabee (Adele), daughter of Emmanuel Hay Cariglio. The name is also recorded as a Jewish family name in the following examples: in the 17th century, the talmudist and kabbalist, Josiah Ben Joseph Pinto (1565-1648), lived in Syria; in the 18th century the French-born economist Isaac de Pinto lived in Amsterdam, Holland; the American merchant and translator of prayer books, Isaac Pinto (1720-1791); and the 20th century the name is recorded with the Yugoslav educator, Avram Pinto.

In the 19th century the surname Pinto is recorded in Essaouira, Morocco.
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People

Rotterdam

Rotterdam


City in W. Netherlands.

 

21st Century

The path to the entrance of a former Jewish institution was renovated in 2001.

 

History

After first trying to attract Marranos from Antwerp in 1604, the city of Rotterdam issued a charter in 1610 which promised various privileges, including complete religious freedom. However, this charter was abolished by the municipality two years later and a large number of those Portuguese who had settled meanwhile left for Amsterdam. Nevertheless, a small group remained, opening a synagogue and buying a plot of land to serve as a cemetery. An important reinforcement to the community came in 1647, when the wealthy de Pinto family arrived in Rotterdam and returned to Judaism.

That same year the municipality accorded the Jews the same rights as those obtained in Amsterdam. In Abraham de Pinto's house a synagogue and a yeshivah - the Jesiba de los Pintos - were opened; head of the yeshivah was Josiah Pardo, who also served as chief rabbi of the community (1648-69). In 1669 the yeshivah was transferred to Amsterdam.

From then on it was the de la Penha family, mostly merchants and shipowners, who played the major role in the community, which continued to exist until 1736. An Ashkenazi community was founded in 1660, at first fostered by the Portuguese community. Its first chief rabbi was Judah Loeb from Vilna (c. 1674-c. 1700). The Ashkenazim were in a difficult economic position; as they were not admitted to the guilds, they were mostly petty traders or dealers in old clothes, or they engaged in one of the few permitted crafts. In addition, they were allowed to sell their merchandise in the market until 1 p.m. only. Nevertheless, their number grew steadily. In 1725 a beautiful synagogue was built, which was destroyed during the German bombing of the city in 1940.

Emancipation in 1796 brought important changes, particularly because it put an end to the absolute power of the parnasim in the community. A grave conflict in the community over the powers of the parnasim was settled by the chief rabbi, Levi Hijman from Breslau (1781--1809), who enjoyed great renown as a scholar and was the author of Penei Aryeh.

In the 19th century the community flourished, owing to the growth of Rotterdam's port. The number of Jews increased from 2,104 in 1809 to more than 13,000 in 1940. In addition to several synagogues in different quarters of the city, a second great synagogue, built in 1891, was consecrated in 1939. The economic position of the Jews improved, particularly toward the end of the 19th century, to such an extent that the number of welfare cases decreased from 1,700 in 1873 to 1,600 in 1901 despite the growth of the community. The most important chief rabbis of Rotterdam were Joseph Isaacssohn (1850-71), who settled a conflict between Reform and Orthodox, and Bernhard Loebel Ritter (1885-1928), a leading scholar and a determined opponent of Zionism. In spite of innumerable endeavors to stimulate Jewish life in Rotterdam through a weekly journal, a literary club, and more than 20 other organizations,
assimilation had a serious impact. However, the community extended important help and assistance to refugees from Germany after 1933.

 

The Holocaust Period

In 1940 there were some 13,000 Jews living in Rotterdam (2% of the city's population); 60% of them were engaged in commerce and 20% in industry. With the invasion of Holland, the German bombers destroyed the center including two synagogues and the bet midrash, which contained valuable manuscripts. On September 1, 1941, all Jewish children were expelled from the public schools, and three Jewish elementary schools, a high school, and a school of higher learning were established. Large-scale deportations to the Westerbork concentration camp and from there to Poland began in late July 1942.

 

Postwar

After the war some 800 Jews returned to Rotterdam from concentration camps and hideouts. In 1969 about 1,300 of the 800,000 inhabitants of Rotterdam were Jews. Of these some 800 were members of the Jewish congregation.

Most prewar Jewish institutions, such as the home for the aged, the orphanage, and the hospital, were not reopened; but the central Jewish home for the aged, which until 1942 existed in Gouda, to the northeast of Rotterdam, was reopened in 1950. After services had been held on temporary premises for nine years, a new modern synagogue, with adjoining classrooms, secretariat, and a modern communal center subsidized by the government reconstruction fund for wartime damage, was inaugurated in 1954. The small square in front of it was officially named A. D. N. Davids Square in 1967 after the late chief rabbi, who perished in a concentration camp. Rabbi L. Vorst was communal rabbi from 1931. He was appointed chief rabbi of Rotterdam and district after the war, retiring in 1971. He was succeeded by Rabbi D. Kahn.