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The Jewish Community of Hildburghausen

Hildburghausen

A town and capital of the Hildburghausen district in Thuringia, Germany.

First Jewish presence: 1331; peak Jewish population: 130 in 1844; Jewish population in 1933: 30

Records from 1331 mention the presence of Jews in Hildburghausen, but beyond the fact that Jews were expelled from the town in the 1400s, not much is known about the town’s early Jewish community. Jews returned to Hildburghausen in the early 1700s. The construction costs of the community’s first synagogue, inaugurated in 1811, were covered by Levi Simon, a prominent local Jew. In the mid-1820s, Simon financed a new and larger synagogue. In response to increasing anti-Semitism, the Jewish population began to dwindle in 1930. In 1933, Nazis forced the Jews to hand over the synagogue to a local branch of a large bank, after which prayer services were conducted in a small building located in the courtyard of a Jewish-owned metalwork factory; and it was this small synagogue that the Nazis vandalized on Pogrom Night (Nov. 9, 1938). The synagogue building is now a warehouse. As of this writing, a memorial plaque has never been erected in Hildburghausen.

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This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.

Place Type:
Town
ID Number:
16920960
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Nearby places:

Related items:

Weitersroda

A village in the Hildburghausen district in Thuringia, Germany. 

Whether there was a Jewish community in Weitersroda can no longer be traced today. The only meaningful document that testifies about Jewish activities dates from 1680. In this document, the Hildburghausen Jews received a princely permission to establish their own burial place, as this was denied to them in Hildburghausen. The Jewish community of Simmershausen also used the cemetery until 1885. In 1720 the property became the property of the Jewish community in Hildburghausen. The cemetery was expanded in 1720 and again in 1806 and is now very well preserved. The mikve, built around 1900, has also been preserved, but it is in need of restoration.

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This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.

Roemhild 

Römhild

A town in the district of Hildburghausen in Thuringia, Germany.

A Jewish community was only established in Römhild in the 19th century. In the preceding centuries, small groups of Jews repeatedly lived in Römhild, but there was no continuous Jewish settlement in Römhild. The Jews of Römhild belonged to the Jewish community of Bibra. Never more than 30 Jews lived in Römhild. The community used a prayer room in the private house of the merchant Adolf Kahn, his house served the Nazis during the war as a so-called "Jewish house". All of Römhild's Jewish residents had to live here crowded together until they were deported to the Nazi concentration and death camps in 1942. The building, located at Heurichstrasse 8, has been preserved as a residential building today.

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This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.