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AHARONI Origin of surname

AHARONI

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a patronymic surname based on a male ancestor's personal name, in this case of biblical origin.

Aharoni is one of the Hebrew forms of "Aaron's son". Aaron/Aharon, son of Amram and Jochebed, of the tribe of Levi, was the elder brother of Moses. He was the first high priest of the Jews, and the ancestor of the Cohanim. Numerous personal and family names are linked to Aaron, spokesman and aide of Moses, among them Aron, Aren, Oren, Horn, Goren, Oron and Baron.

Distinguished bearers of the Jewish family name Aharoni include the Lithuanian-born Eretz Israel naturalist and zoologist Israel Aharoni (1882-1946); the 20th century Eretz Israel-born English physicist Joseph Aharoni; and the 20th century German-born Israeli archaeologist Yohanan Aharoni.
ID Number:
161839
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Ben Zion Aharoni, one of the leaders of the Jewish community in Aden, Yemen, born in Aden into the Massa (Moshe) family, a wealthy family that engaged in international trade and led the community in Aden for many years.

In 1928 the Aliyah Department (“Immigration Department”) of the Jewish Agency sent a delegation to Yemen led by R.D. Kesselman. He set up an office in Aden and Aharoni was named the representative of the Jewish Agency's Aliyah Department in Yemen. Aharoni was in contact with the Jewish communities of Sana’a and highland Yemen and compiled a list of candidates for immigration to Eretz Israel. His tenure as a representative of the Aliyah Department was difficult: as the person in charge of distributing the few certificates he received from the Jewish Agency, he had to take care of refugees from Yemen and was under heavy pressure from the Jews of Yemen to speed up their immigration. Aharoni was instrumental in assisting the immigration of Yemeni Jews during 1928-1939. His letters to the Jewish Agency's offices in Eretz Israel are an important source for studying the period and the problems of immigration from Yemen and Aden. Aharoni had good relations with the British authorities in Aden and in 1939 was appointed representative of the Jewish community in the city council.

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AHARONI Origin of surname
AHARONI

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a patronymic surname based on a male ancestor's personal name, in this case of biblical origin.

Aharoni is one of the Hebrew forms of "Aaron's son". Aaron/Aharon, son of Amram and Jochebed, of the tribe of Levi, was the elder brother of Moses. He was the first high priest of the Jews, and the ancestor of the Cohanim. Numerous personal and family names are linked to Aaron, spokesman and aide of Moses, among them Aron, Aren, Oren, Horn, Goren, Oron and Baron.

Distinguished bearers of the Jewish family name Aharoni include the Lithuanian-born Eretz Israel naturalist and zoologist Israel Aharoni (1882-1946); the 20th century Eretz Israel-born English physicist Joseph Aharoni; and the 20th century German-born Israeli archaeologist Yohanan Aharoni.
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Ben Zion Aharoni

Ben Zion Aharoni, one of the leaders of the Jewish community in Aden, Yemen, born in Aden into the Massa (Moshe) family, a wealthy family that engaged in international trade and led the community in Aden for many years.

In 1928 the Aliyah Department (“Immigration Department”) of the Jewish Agency sent a delegation to Yemen led by R.D. Kesselman. He set up an office in Aden and Aharoni was named the representative of the Jewish Agency's Aliyah Department in Yemen. Aharoni was in contact with the Jewish communities of Sana’a and highland Yemen and compiled a list of candidates for immigration to Eretz Israel. His tenure as a representative of the Aliyah Department was difficult: as the person in charge of distributing the few certificates he received from the Jewish Agency, he had to take care of refugees from Yemen and was under heavy pressure from the Jews of Yemen to speed up their immigration. Aharoni was instrumental in assisting the immigration of Yemeni Jews during 1928-1939. His letters to the Jewish Agency's offices in Eretz Israel are an important source for studying the period and the problems of immigration from Yemen and Aden. Aharoni had good relations with the British authorities in Aden and in 1939 was appointed representative of the Jewish community in the city council.