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Beth Midrash of the Ba'al Shem Tov (1700-1760), Medhzibozh

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Exterior view of the Ba'al Shem Tov (1700-1760) Beth Midrash, Medhzibozh, Podolia

The Oster Visual Documentation Center, ANU – Museum of the Jewish People, courtesy of Rachel Jodefat, Israel

Photo period:
20th century
ID Number:
156491
Image Purchase: For more details about image purchasing Click here, make sure you have the photo ID number (as appear above)
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Medzhybizh

Yid. Medzibezh; Rus. Medzhibozh; Pol. Miedzyboz,
A Small town in the Letychinsky Raion (formerly Khmelnitsky oblast), Ukraine


Until 1793 in Poland and then under Russia, until 1917 in the province of Podolia.

The Jewish community of Medzhybizh is one of the oldest in the Ukraine - Jews are mentioned there in 1518 - and until the Chmielnicki persecutions of 1648 one of the largest in Podolia. During the first half of the 17th century, Joel Sirkes officiated as rabbi. The community suffered severely at the hands of the Cossacks in 1651, 1664, and again at the beginning of the 18th century. In 1765 there were 2,039 Jews registered in the community of Medzibezh and the nearby villages. The founder of Chasidism, Israel b. Eliezer Ba'al Shem Tov, made the town his seat from about 1740 until his death in 1760 and was buried there. The tzaddikim Baruch b. Jehiel, Israel's grandson, and R. Abraham Joshua Heschel of Apta also lived and were buried there. From 1815 to 1827, a printing press published Chasidic and kabbalistic works in Medzhybizh. From 1,719 in 1847 the number of Jews grew to 6,040 (73.9% of the total population) in 1897, then fell to 4,614 (58.2%) in 1926.

The community was destroyed after the German occupation in 1941.

According to various Jewish organizations, in 2011 there was only one Jew, aged 96, living in the town. The grave of R. Israel b. Eliezer Ba'al Shem Tov serves as a place of pilgrimage for Jews from all over the world. After the fall of the Soviet regime, a synague and a visitor's center were established close to Ba'al Shem Tov's burial place. The last Jewish burial took place in 2011 in the new Jewish cemetery. In 1967, the local municipality erected a monument in the memory of Holocaust victims from the town.
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Beth Midrash of the Ba'al Shem Tov (1700-1760), Medhzibozh

Exterior view of the Ba'al Shem Tov (1700-1760) Beth Midrash, Medhzibozh, Podolia

The Oster Visual Documentation Center, ANU – Museum of the Jewish People, courtesy of Rachel Jodefat, Israel

Image Purchase: For more details about image purchasing Click here, make sure you have the photo ID number (as appear above)

Medzibezh (Medzhibozh)
Medzhybizh

Yid. Medzibezh; Rus. Medzhibozh; Pol. Miedzyboz,
A Small town in the Letychinsky Raion (formerly Khmelnitsky oblast), Ukraine


Until 1793 in Poland and then under Russia, until 1917 in the province of Podolia.

The Jewish community of Medzhybizh is one of the oldest in the Ukraine - Jews are mentioned there in 1518 - and until the Chmielnicki persecutions of 1648 one of the largest in Podolia. During the first half of the 17th century, Joel Sirkes officiated as rabbi. The community suffered severely at the hands of the Cossacks in 1651, 1664, and again at the beginning of the 18th century. In 1765 there were 2,039 Jews registered in the community of Medzibezh and the nearby villages. The founder of Chasidism, Israel b. Eliezer Ba'al Shem Tov, made the town his seat from about 1740 until his death in 1760 and was buried there. The tzaddikim Baruch b. Jehiel, Israel's grandson, and R. Abraham Joshua Heschel of Apta also lived and were buried there. From 1815 to 1827, a printing press published Chasidic and kabbalistic works in Medzhybizh. From 1,719 in 1847 the number of Jews grew to 6,040 (73.9% of the total population) in 1897, then fell to 4,614 (58.2%) in 1926.

The community was destroyed after the German occupation in 1941.

According to various Jewish organizations, in 2011 there was only one Jew, aged 96, living in the town. The grave of R. Israel b. Eliezer Ba'al Shem Tov serves as a place of pilgrimage for Jews from all over the world. After the fall of the Soviet regime, a synague and a visitor's center were established close to Ba'al Shem Tov's burial place. The last Jewish burial took place in 2011 in the new Jewish cemetery. In 1967, the local municipality erected a monument in the memory of Holocaust victims from the town.