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HARARI Origin of surname

HARARI, HARERE, HARERI, HARER, HARAR, HARAMI

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name.

Harari/Harere/Hareri/Harer/Harar mean "from the mountain" in Hebrew.

This family name may be a patronymic, derived from a male ancestor's personal name, in this case of biblical origin. As a personal name, Harari is found in the Bible in I Chronicles 11.27 ("Harorite").

However the name may also be a toponymic (derived from a geographic name of a town, city, region or country). Surnames that are based on place names do not always testify to direct origin from that place, but may indicate an indirect relation between the name-bearer or his ancestors and the place, such as birth place, temporary residence, trade, or family-relatives.

Ir Har ("city of the mountain") is the Hebrew name of the French city of Montpellier.

As a Jewish family name, Harari is documented in the second half of the 13th century with the liturgical poet, Judah (Aryeh) Harari, who lived in Montpellier (Ir Har), France.

Distinguished bearers of the Jewish family name Harari include the early 17th century scholar Moses Harari, who founded a well-known family of rabbis, from Aleppo, and the Egyptian financier and businessman, Sir Victor Raphael Harari (1857-1945).
ID Number:
153026
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Montpellier

Capital of the Herault department, southern France.

21st Century

Centre Culturel et Communautaire Juif de Montpellier (CCCJ) (Jewish Cultural and Community Center of Montpellier). The CCCJ's vocation is the dissemination of Jewish culture in Montpellier and its region. It is a place open to all and provides its members with a library of over 1,000 titles. The CCCJ offers a kosher restaurant service once a week; every Wednesday noon. The CCCJ has rooms for rent for family celebrations and seminars.

Address: 500 boulevard d’Antigone
34000 Montpellier
France

Website: http://www.ccj34.com/

HISTORY

The first implicit evidence of the presence of Jews there is found in the will of Guilhem V, lord of Montpellier, who forbade the investiture of a Jew as bailiff. Even though Benjamin of Tudela, in about 1165, does not mention any figure for the Jewish population of Montpellier, its importance can be deduced from the fact that he mentions several yeshivot. Until at least the close of the 12th century the Jews of Montpellier appear to have been particularly active in commerce; they are explicitly mentioned in the trade agreement between Montpellier and Agde; and they appear in the tariff of taxes due from the merchants of Montpellier in Narbonne. Until the close of the 12th century they do not appear to have practiced moneylending. In times of war, particularly when the town was besieged, the Jews helped in its defense by supplying weapons, for instance 20,000 arrows, as noted in an agreement at the beginning of the 13th century. From the middle of the 13th century moneylending was regulated by the ordinances of James I, King of Majorca, who also ruled over the duchy of Montpellier together with the bishop of Lender was called upon to swear that it involved neither fraud nor usury. In addition, the consuls of the town prohibited loans to people under the age of 25 without the consent of their parents. James I's legislation concerning the Jews promulgated in 1267 was fairly favorable, especially the clause prohibiting their prosecution on the basis of an anonymous denunciation. Those who accused or denounced Jews were threatened with being condemned themselves if they could not prove their accusation; bail was to be granted to the accused Jew if he could provide a satisfactory guarantee.

During the 13th century a Jewish quarter existed on the present site of the rue Barralerie (until the 15th century it was named Sabatarie neuve); in the first house on this street there are still some remains of the synagogue and in particular of the mikveh in the cellar. Although the Jews were dispossessed of their ancient cemetery when James I gave it to the Cistercians of Valemagne in 1263, the latter were required to refund the cost of the exhumation and the transfer of the remains to the new cemetery. When the Jews were expelled from France in 1306, the king of Majorca opposed the measure. After considerable delay, the expulsion finally took place, and it was scant comfort to the Jews that the king of France was required to give to the king of Majorca two-thirds of the booty seized from his Jews and one-third of that taken from the other Jews of Montpellier.

In 1315, when the return to France was authorized, the Jews of Montpellier, like those elsewhere, were again placed under the authority of their former lords. In 1319 Sancho I, King of Majorca, permitted them to acquire a cemetery. It is not known in which quarter the Jews lived during this short stay, which lasted until 1322 (or 1323). In 1349 James III of Majorca sold his seigneury over Montpellier to Phillip VI of France. Thus when the Jews reestablished themselves there in 1359 they found themselves under the direct sovereignty of the king of France, Charles V. After their first having been assigned to the Castelmoton quarter, complaints from the Christian inhabitants compelled them to move to the rue de la Vielle intendance quarter, where they owned a synagogue and a school (after 1365). The Jews had to provide large financial contributions to the defense of the town, particularly in 1362 and 1363. In 1374 they were also obliged to participate in guarding the gates. The erection of a new synagogue of great beauty in 1387 gave rise to a lawsuit with the bishop of Maguelonne, to whom the Jews paid the then enormous sum of 400 livres. In Montpellier the final expulsion of the Jews from France in 1394 was preceded by violent accusations against them in the municipal council.
Even though the town had numerous Jewish physicians - who were subjected to a probative examination from 1272 - there is no valid evidence that the Jews had a part in founding and organizing the school of medicine there. Excluding those scholars who only lived temporarily in Montpellier, such as Abraham b. David of Posquieres, the foremost scholar in the town was Solomon b. Abraham b. Samuel, who denounced the work of Maimonides to the Inquisition. One of his leading followers was his disciple, Jonah b. Abraham Gerondi, who died in Toledo. The liturgical poet Aryeh Judah Harari lived there during the second half of the 13th century, as did Aaron b. Joseph ha-Levi, the opponent of Solomon b. Abraham Adret, and Isaac b. Jacob ha-kohen Alfasi. From 1303 to 1306 Montpellier was again the scene of a renewed polemic between the supporters and opponents of the study of philosophy. The latter were led by Jacob b. Machir ibn Tibbon. In the later medieval community of Montpellier, the
physician and philosopher Abraham Avigdor was particularly distinguished.

In the middle of the 16th century the presence in Montpellier of conversos, who chiefly lived among the protestant population, is vouched for by a Swiss traveler, a student named platter. From the beginning of the 16th century Jews from Comtat venaissin traded in the town. In 1653 the attorney general of the parliament of Toulouse directed the town magistrates to expel them. Similar orders were repeated in 1679 and 1680. A special register was opened at the town record office for the Jews who made their way to Montpellier as a result of a general authorization, granted from the end of the 17th century, enabling them to trade for one month during each season.

From 1714 nine Jews were allowed to settle in the town; others followed with the tacit consent of the magistrates, in spite of complaints by the Christian merchants. At the beginning of the 19th century (1805) the Jewish community consisted of 105 persons and was headed by R. Moise Milhau, who represented the department of Vaucluse at the Great Sanhedrin. Thirteen local Jews served in the armies of the Revolution and of the Empire, five as volunteers. The historian and physician Joseph Salvador was born in Montpellier of an old Spanish-Jewish family which had fled the Inquisition.

At the beginning of the 20th century there were about 35 Jewish families in Montpellier.

After the 1940 armistice, Montpellier, which was in the unoccupied zone, became a center for Jewish refugees from the occupied part of France. After the latter was occupied by the Germans, Montpellier became an important relaying station for the Jewish partisans. After the liberation the community was reorganized and by 1960 had 600 members. The arrival of Jews from North Africa increased the number to 2,000 in 1969, when the community had a communal center and a Sephardi synagogue with 300 seats. There were two kosher butchers and a Talmud Torah.

In the 1980s, the Jewish Community Center of Montpellier became the Jewish Community and Cultural Center of Montpellier.

In 1994, the Board of Directors of the Jewish Community and Cultural Center of Montpellier (CCCJ) decided to move and settle at 500 boulevard d'Antigone by becoming the owner of its premises with the help of the FSJU, the Town Hall of Montpellier, the General Council of Hérault and the Languedoc Roussillon Regional Council. we are still in these premises today.

Since its creation, many activities have been carried out, including fifteen trips to Israel, celebrations of the Day of Jerusalem and Yom Haatsmaut (day of independence of the State of Israel) that we celebrate every year. Other activities include the prestigious Jewish and Israeli Film Festival which took place for 10 years, the Night of Letters, the week of memory, weekly activities (oriental dances, computer science, choir, modern Hebrew, biblical Hebrew, krav maga,…) as well as conferences, literary evenings, round tables, exhibitions, theater performances. 

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HARARI Origin of surname
HARARI, HARERE, HARERI, HARER, HARAR, HARAMI

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name.

Harari/Harere/Hareri/Harer/Harar mean "from the mountain" in Hebrew.

This family name may be a patronymic, derived from a male ancestor's personal name, in this case of biblical origin. As a personal name, Harari is found in the Bible in I Chronicles 11.27 ("Harorite").

However the name may also be a toponymic (derived from a geographic name of a town, city, region or country). Surnames that are based on place names do not always testify to direct origin from that place, but may indicate an indirect relation between the name-bearer or his ancestors and the place, such as birth place, temporary residence, trade, or family-relatives.

Ir Har ("city of the mountain") is the Hebrew name of the French city of Montpellier.

As a Jewish family name, Harari is documented in the second half of the 13th century with the liturgical poet, Judah (Aryeh) Harari, who lived in Montpellier (Ir Har), France.

Distinguished bearers of the Jewish family name Harari include the early 17th century scholar Moses Harari, who founded a well-known family of rabbis, from Aleppo, and the Egyptian financier and businessman, Sir Victor Raphael Harari (1857-1945).
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People

Montpellier

Montpellier

Capital of the Herault department, southern France.

21st Century

Centre Culturel et Communautaire Juif de Montpellier (CCCJ) (Jewish Cultural and Community Center of Montpellier). The CCCJ's vocation is the dissemination of Jewish culture in Montpellier and its region. It is a place open to all and provides its members with a library of over 1,000 titles. The CCCJ offers a kosher restaurant service once a week; every Wednesday noon. The CCCJ has rooms for rent for family celebrations and seminars.

Address: 500 boulevard d’Antigone
34000 Montpellier
France

Website: http://www.ccj34.com/

HISTORY

The first implicit evidence of the presence of Jews there is found in the will of Guilhem V, lord of Montpellier, who forbade the investiture of a Jew as bailiff. Even though Benjamin of Tudela, in about 1165, does not mention any figure for the Jewish population of Montpellier, its importance can be deduced from the fact that he mentions several yeshivot. Until at least the close of the 12th century the Jews of Montpellier appear to have been particularly active in commerce; they are explicitly mentioned in the trade agreement between Montpellier and Agde; and they appear in the tariff of taxes due from the merchants of Montpellier in Narbonne. Until the close of the 12th century they do not appear to have practiced moneylending. In times of war, particularly when the town was besieged, the Jews helped in its defense by supplying weapons, for instance 20,000 arrows, as noted in an agreement at the beginning of the 13th century. From the middle of the 13th century moneylending was regulated by the ordinances of James I, King of Majorca, who also ruled over the duchy of Montpellier together with the bishop of Lender was called upon to swear that it involved neither fraud nor usury. In addition, the consuls of the town prohibited loans to people under the age of 25 without the consent of their parents. James I's legislation concerning the Jews promulgated in 1267 was fairly favorable, especially the clause prohibiting their prosecution on the basis of an anonymous denunciation. Those who accused or denounced Jews were threatened with being condemned themselves if they could not prove their accusation; bail was to be granted to the accused Jew if he could provide a satisfactory guarantee.

During the 13th century a Jewish quarter existed on the present site of the rue Barralerie (until the 15th century it was named Sabatarie neuve); in the first house on this street there are still some remains of the synagogue and in particular of the mikveh in the cellar. Although the Jews were dispossessed of their ancient cemetery when James I gave it to the Cistercians of Valemagne in 1263, the latter were required to refund the cost of the exhumation and the transfer of the remains to the new cemetery. When the Jews were expelled from France in 1306, the king of Majorca opposed the measure. After considerable delay, the expulsion finally took place, and it was scant comfort to the Jews that the king of France was required to give to the king of Majorca two-thirds of the booty seized from his Jews and one-third of that taken from the other Jews of Montpellier.

In 1315, when the return to France was authorized, the Jews of Montpellier, like those elsewhere, were again placed under the authority of their former lords. In 1319 Sancho I, King of Majorca, permitted them to acquire a cemetery. It is not known in which quarter the Jews lived during this short stay, which lasted until 1322 (or 1323). In 1349 James III of Majorca sold his seigneury over Montpellier to Phillip VI of France. Thus when the Jews reestablished themselves there in 1359 they found themselves under the direct sovereignty of the king of France, Charles V. After their first having been assigned to the Castelmoton quarter, complaints from the Christian inhabitants compelled them to move to the rue de la Vielle intendance quarter, where they owned a synagogue and a school (after 1365). The Jews had to provide large financial contributions to the defense of the town, particularly in 1362 and 1363. In 1374 they were also obliged to participate in guarding the gates. The erection of a new synagogue of great beauty in 1387 gave rise to a lawsuit with the bishop of Maguelonne, to whom the Jews paid the then enormous sum of 400 livres. In Montpellier the final expulsion of the Jews from France in 1394 was preceded by violent accusations against them in the municipal council.
Even though the town had numerous Jewish physicians - who were subjected to a probative examination from 1272 - there is no valid evidence that the Jews had a part in founding and organizing the school of medicine there. Excluding those scholars who only lived temporarily in Montpellier, such as Abraham b. David of Posquieres, the foremost scholar in the town was Solomon b. Abraham b. Samuel, who denounced the work of Maimonides to the Inquisition. One of his leading followers was his disciple, Jonah b. Abraham Gerondi, who died in Toledo. The liturgical poet Aryeh Judah Harari lived there during the second half of the 13th century, as did Aaron b. Joseph ha-Levi, the opponent of Solomon b. Abraham Adret, and Isaac b. Jacob ha-kohen Alfasi. From 1303 to 1306 Montpellier was again the scene of a renewed polemic between the supporters and opponents of the study of philosophy. The latter were led by Jacob b. Machir ibn Tibbon. In the later medieval community of Montpellier, the
physician and philosopher Abraham Avigdor was particularly distinguished.

In the middle of the 16th century the presence in Montpellier of conversos, who chiefly lived among the protestant population, is vouched for by a Swiss traveler, a student named platter. From the beginning of the 16th century Jews from Comtat venaissin traded in the town. In 1653 the attorney general of the parliament of Toulouse directed the town magistrates to expel them. Similar orders were repeated in 1679 and 1680. A special register was opened at the town record office for the Jews who made their way to Montpellier as a result of a general authorization, granted from the end of the 17th century, enabling them to trade for one month during each season.

From 1714 nine Jews were allowed to settle in the town; others followed with the tacit consent of the magistrates, in spite of complaints by the Christian merchants. At the beginning of the 19th century (1805) the Jewish community consisted of 105 persons and was headed by R. Moise Milhau, who represented the department of Vaucluse at the Great Sanhedrin. Thirteen local Jews served in the armies of the Revolution and of the Empire, five as volunteers. The historian and physician Joseph Salvador was born in Montpellier of an old Spanish-Jewish family which had fled the Inquisition.

At the beginning of the 20th century there were about 35 Jewish families in Montpellier.

After the 1940 armistice, Montpellier, which was in the unoccupied zone, became a center for Jewish refugees from the occupied part of France. After the latter was occupied by the Germans, Montpellier became an important relaying station for the Jewish partisans. After the liberation the community was reorganized and by 1960 had 600 members. The arrival of Jews from North Africa increased the number to 2,000 in 1969, when the community had a communal center and a Sephardi synagogue with 300 seats. There were two kosher butchers and a Talmud Torah.

In the 1980s, the Jewish Community Center of Montpellier became the Jewish Community and Cultural Center of Montpellier.

In 1994, the Board of Directors of the Jewish Community and Cultural Center of Montpellier (CCCJ) decided to move and settle at 500 boulevard d'Antigone by becoming the owner of its premises with the help of the FSJU, the Town Hall of Montpellier, the General Council of Hérault and the Languedoc Roussillon Regional Council. we are still in these premises today.

Since its creation, many activities have been carried out, including fifteen trips to Israel, celebrations of the Day of Jerusalem and Yom Haatsmaut (day of independence of the State of Israel) that we celebrate every year. Other activities include the prestigious Jewish and Israeli Film Festival which took place for 10 years, the Night of Letters, the week of memory, weekly activities (oriental dances, computer science, choir, modern Hebrew, biblical Hebrew, krav maga,…) as well as conferences, literary evenings, round tables, exhibitions, theater performances.