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MINTZ Origin of surname

MINTZ

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a toponymic (that are based on place names do not always testify to direct origin from that place, but may indicate an indirect relation between the name-bearer or his ancestors and the place, such as birth place, temporary residence, trade, or family-relatives.

The Jewish surname Mintz is based on the city of Mainz (Mayence in French) on the Rhine, western Germany. One of the most ancient sites of Jewish settlement in Ashkenaz, Jews lived there since the year 900 CE. Numerous Jewish family names derive from this source, ranging from Min(t)z, Mints, Minc, to Muenz and Muenzer (literally "minter" in German). It is possible that some of these variants indicate origin from one of two towns called Minsk, one the capital city of White Russia, today Belarus, where Jews lived since the 15th century, the other a town in east-central Poland (Minsk Mazowieckie) where Jews lived since at least the 18th century.

Other related family names: Minz(t), Mints, Minc, Muenz (literally "coin") and Muenzer (literally "minter" in German). In some cases Mintz originally a personal or an occupational nickname for a "minter".

Distinguished bearers of the Jewish surname Mintz include the 15th century Mainz-born German talmudist, Moses Ben Isaac Mintz; the Latvian lawyer Paul Mintz (1870-1940), member of the Latvian National Council and the constituent assembly and state controller, who was active in Jewish affairs; and the 20th century Polish-born Israeli attorney, Izhak Josef Mintz, an expert in aviation law.
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MINTZ Origin of surname
MINTZ

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name is a toponymic (that are based on place names do not always testify to direct origin from that place, but may indicate an indirect relation between the name-bearer or his ancestors and the place, such as birth place, temporary residence, trade, or family-relatives.

The Jewish surname Mintz is based on the city of Mainz (Mayence in French) on the Rhine, western Germany. One of the most ancient sites of Jewish settlement in Ashkenaz, Jews lived there since the year 900 CE. Numerous Jewish family names derive from this source, ranging from Min(t)z, Mints, Minc, to Muenz and Muenzer (literally "minter" in German). It is possible that some of these variants indicate origin from one of two towns called Minsk, one the capital city of White Russia, today Belarus, where Jews lived since the 15th century, the other a town in east-central Poland (Minsk Mazowieckie) where Jews lived since at least the 18th century.

Other related family names: Minz(t), Mints, Minc, Muenz (literally "coin") and Muenzer (literally "minter" in German). In some cases Mintz originally a personal or an occupational nickname for a "minter".

Distinguished bearers of the Jewish surname Mintz include the 15th century Mainz-born German talmudist, Moses Ben Isaac Mintz; the Latvian lawyer Paul Mintz (1870-1940), member of the Latvian National Council and the constituent assembly and state controller, who was active in Jewish affairs; and the 20th century Polish-born Israeli attorney, Izhak Josef Mintz, an expert in aviation law.
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People