Search
Print
Share
Your Selected Item:
1 \ 10
Removed
Added
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions

The Jewish Community of St. Petersburg

St. Petersburg

Санкт-Петербург; also known as Petrograd 1914-1924, and Leningrad 1924-1991

Capital of Russia until 1918. An industrial city and major port on the Baltic Sea.

CONTEMPORARY HISTORY

The Jewish community of St. Petersburg is the second-largest in Russia. Mass emigration reduced the Jewish population from 107,000 in 1989 to about 40,000 in 2002. A 2010 census revealed that these numbers did not change considerably and that the number of Jewish residents in St. Petersburg has remained at around 40,000 people. Prior to the collapse of the Soviet Union the Jews of St. Petersburg were in many ways disconnected from Jewish culture. However, since the end of communism in Russia, St. Petersburg has emerged as a vibrant Jewish community. While a significant segment of the community remains uncomfortable with, and not entirely open about, its Jewishness, an increasing number of the city's Jews identify as Jewish and have begun observing Jewish traditions and rituals.

Jews began arriving in St. Petersburg during the second half of the 19th century, primarily from the "Pale of Residence", which was made up of modern-day Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, Moldova, and Lithuania. This time was marked by intense Russification, which included a high rate of mixed marriages and conversions to Christianity. Most of the Jews of St. Petersburg have lived in the city for generations, though there are many who have arrived more recently from other locations within Russia and the region, including the Ukraine, the Caucasus, and Georgia. Since the restriction on emigration was lifted in 1989, as many as 230,000 Jews left for Israel.

Two umbrella organizations serve both the community of St. Petersburg and Russian Jewry more generally: the Federation of Jewish Organizations and Communities of Russia, and The Russian-Jewish Congress. With the support of foreign Jewish philanthropy, several Jewish welfare programs, as well as a full range of religious and educational institutions, have been developed in St. Petersburg. Russia's network of Jewish educational institutions includes four Jewish universities, which are mainly located in St. Petersburg and Moscow. A number of smaller religious and social organizations have been established by young Jews in their twenties and thirties. Events such as the Jewish festival take place annually in the community. St. Petersburg has also been host to annual events and conferences organized by Limmud FSU, an organization which specializes in meeting the cultural needs of the Jewish communities of the former Soviet Union (FSU). Since 2011 these conferences have attracted hundreds of Jews from St. Petersburg, providing a safe environment for Jewish youth to learn more about their Jewish heritage. Jewish newspapers and Russian-language media have emerged in St. Petersburg, Moscow, and other cities with smaller organized Jewish communities.

The vast majority of Russian Jewry, including the community of St. Petersburg, is secular and defines their Jewishness in cultural rather than religious terms. Of the religiously observant Jews in St. Petersburg, most are Orthodox. In an effort to support the resurgence in religious observance, many rabbis from outside Russia have been brought to St. Petersburg. The Chabad-Lubavitch movement has been very active in the community since the end of the 20th century, and the Reform and Conservative streams of Judaism have also been introduced.

The central hub of Jewish life in St. Petersburg is the Yesod Jewish Community Center (JCC). Opened in 2005, the facility houses six of the community's major Jewish organizations, including the Hesed Avraam Charity Center, Adain Lo Family Center, Hillel Student Center, the Granatik Children Center, ORT, and the Library & Eitan Jewish Education Center. Additionally, the JCC offers many cultural and educational programs. It holds lectures, sponsors events, and includes its own Sunday school.

The most notable synagogue in St. Petersburg is the Grand Choral Synagogue. Constructed in the Moorish Revival-Byzantine style between 1880 and 1888, and consecrated in 1893, the Grand Choral is the second-largest synagogue in Europe. Prior to its construction, a synagogue large enough to serve the entire Jewish community in Russia's then-capital did not exist. However, the synagogue could only be built after obtaining a building permit from Tsar Alexander II in 1869.

Located in the Russian Museum of Ethnography is an exhibit dedicated to Russian Jewry. The exhibit "History and Culture of the Jewish people of the Territory of Russia" is considered by many in the community to be the first step toward the development of a completely separate Jewish museum. As one of the city's important cultural institutions, the museum attracts visitors from all over Russia, including Jews from neighboring countries.

Another significant Jewish landmark is the Holocaust memorial, located in Tsarskoye Selo. The monument stands just 500 meters from Catherin's palace where the Jewish ghetto was located during the Second World War.

One of the oldest points of Jewish interest in the city is St. Petersburg's Jewish cemetery. Founded in 1875, the cemetery serves as the burial place for several historical figures such as the sculptor Mark Antokolsky, the 19th century scientist and Jewish community leader David Ginsburg, and Abraham Lubanov, who served as the head rabbi of the St. Petersburg Synagogue during World War II.

HISTORY

There is evidence that there were some Marranos who settled in St. Petersburg soon after it was in 1703 by Peter the Great. "The Portuguese Jew," Jan DaCosta (who was actually a converso), was one of the jesters at the royal court during the first half of the 18th century. The city's first police chief was also a converso from the Netherlands. Otherwise, Jews were not allowed to live in the city. Additionally, Czarina Elizabeth issued intolerant decrees against the Jews, and the few Jews who were living in St. Petersburg were forced to leave. Catherine II (Catherine the Great), on the other hand, was interested in attracting Jewish contractors, industrialists, and physicians to the city, and therefore issued instructions to the authorities to overlook the presence of the "useful" Jews living there with their families and assistants and had the protection of court officials. It was Catherine II who, after the partitions of Poland in the late 18th century, created the Pale of Settlement, territories in which the Jews of the Russian Empire were permitted to settle permanently (unless they had special permission to settle elsewhere).

With the partitions of Poland at the end of the 18th century, St. Petersburg became a center for the millions of Jews who were incorporated into the Russian Empire. The city quickly became a destination for upper class Jews, both the "useful" Jews—the army veterans, artisans, and wealthy merchants who had official permission to live outside of the Pale—as well as the Jews who settled in St. Petersburg illegally. The leader of Chabad Chasidism, Shneur Zalman of Lyady, was imprisoned in St. Petersburg from 1798 until 1800/1801.

The situation of the Jews worsened with the accession of Czar Nicholas I. In 1827 he issued the Statute on Conscription Duty, which imposed a draft on the Jews of Russia and cancelled the earlier provision that allowed Jews to pay a monetary random instead of submitting to the draft. The draftees would have to serve 25 years, and would fall on Jewish boys and men between the ages of 12 and 25 (as opposed to the general population, in which men 18 to 35 were eligible for the draft). The idea was to modernize and Russify the Jewish population, and became a communal crisis, particularly for the more traditional Jewish communities.

The situation shifted again with the reign of Alexander II. "Useful" Jews, such as army veterans, university graduates, artisans, and upper-class merchants were once again allowed to legally settle in St. Petersburg. By the end of Alexander II's reign in 1881 there were 17,253 Jews in St. Petersburg, making up approximately 2% of the population. Upper class Jews, including the barons of the Guenzburg family became the de facto leaders and representatives before the Central Government.

Several figures held the position of Kazyonnyy Ravin (Government-Appointed Rabbi) in St. Petersburg, including the German-born Abraham Neiman, Avram Drabkin, and Moshe Eisenstadt. Other rabbis who were not officially appointed, yet who led the Jews of the community, were Yitshak Blaser, Yekutiel Zalman Landau, and David Tevel Katzenellenbogen. After 24 years of dealing with bureaucracy and construction, the magnificent Grand Choral Synagogue was completed and consecrated in 1893. It was built in the Moorish style, and contained 1,200 seats. In spite of this triumph, it is important to note that with the opening of the Grand Choral Synagogue, all of the other existing sanctuaries needed to be closed, and their congregants were compelled to pray only in the Grand Choral Synagogue.

The Yiddish, Russian, and Hebrew Jewish presses were centered in St. Petersburg from the 1870s until the revolution in 1905. The newspapers HaMelitz (1871-1873, 1878-1904), HaYom (1886-1888). Dos Yudishes Folksblat (1881-1890) and the first Russian daily newspaper in Yiddish, Der Fraynd (1903-1908), were all published out of St. Petersburg. The city was also the center of Russian-Jewish journalism and literature. One of the most outstanding publications was the Russian-Jewish encyclopedia, Yevreyskaya Entsiklopediya, which was published in 1908.

In spite of censorship, exclusions, and unremitting police persecutions, the community continued to grow, numbering 35,000 (1.8% of the city's population) in 1914.

Many national Jewish organizations located their headquarters in St. Petersburg. The oldest of these organizations was The Society for the Promotion of Culture Among the Jews of Russia, which was founded in 1863. Others included ORT, the Jewish Colonization Association (ICA), the Chovevei Sefat Ever (renamed "Tarbut" after the 1917 Revolution), the Historical-Ethnographic Society, and the Society for Jewish Folk Music. Additionally, a number of institutions in the city housed various objects of Jewish interest. The city's Asian Museum housed a valuable Hebrew department. The Imperial Public Library contained one of the world's oldest and most important collections of Hebrew manuscripts. Under the initiative of Baron David Guenzburg, courses in Oriental Studies were opened in St. Petersburg in 1907. The concentration of public and cultural institutions in the city attracted Jewish authors and intellectuals, including A.A Harkavy, Judah Leib Katzenelson, Simon Dubnow, and father and son Michael and Eugene M. Kulisher.

World War I saw the Jewish population of Petrograd swell to more than 50,000 because of Jews fleeing from the battlefields within the Pale of Settlement, or Jews being expelled by the Russian army who accused them of collaborating with the Germans and Austrians. The influx of Jewish refugees was overwhelming to the city's Jewish residents, though they nonetheless attempted to accommodate them through organizations such as the Jewish Society for the Relief of War Victims.

After the February Revolution of 1917, all residence restrictions affecting the Jews of Petrograd were abolished. As a result, the city became a center for the activities of the diverse parties and factions within Russian Jewry. In June 1917, the Seventh Conference of the Zionist Organization of Russia was held in the city, and plans were also made to convene an All-Russian Jewish Congress in Petrograd. These improvements in Jewish life and national status were, however, short-lived. With the Bolshevik Revolution in October 1917, all Jewish political parties (along with any other non-Bolshevik parties) were forced underground. The center of government moved from Petrograd to Moscow, leaving the city's Jews far from the nation's political center. The transfer of the capital from Petrograd to Moscow in 1918, as well as the shortages and famine that affected the city during the Russian Civil War, severely shook the Jewish community, and many Jews returned to the provincial towns. It was during this difficult period that Joseph Trumpeldor created a Jewish battalion for the purposes of Jewish self-defense. Additionally, he founded the youth organization He-Halutz, to prepare Jewish youth for emigration to Palestine.

By 1920 there were 25,453 Jews (3.5% of the total population) living in Petrograd. With the consolidation of the Soviet regime, the number of Jews rapidly increased, to 52,373 in 1923 (4.9% of the total population), and 84,505 in 1926 (5.2% of the population).

A small group of Russian-Jewish intellectuals attempted to continue their literary and scientific work under the new regime. They worked to sustain their former cultural societies, and continued to publish scientific and literary periodicals. By the end of the 1920s, when these projects were shut down by the Soviet regime, many of these intellectuals left Russia, including Simon Dubnow and Saul M. Ginzburg. Nearly a decade later, by the end of the 1930s, the remaining Communist Jewish organizations had also been suppressed, as had public expressions of Jewish identity.

On the eve of the Nazi invasion, the number of Jews in Leningrad was estimated at about 200,000 people. During World War II, the Jews shared in the suffering and starvation during the German siege of the city. The author, literary critic, and historian Lidiya Yakovlevna Ginzburg was among the survivors of the siege of Leningrad.

In the census of 1959, 162,344 Jews were registered as living in Leningrad, but the real number was probably closer to 200,000. 13,728 of these respondents declared Yiddish as their mother tongue. The city's only synagogue was the Grand Choral Synagogue, which was still standing in spite of having been bombed by the Nazis in 1941 and 1943. During the 1950s Gedalia Pecherski was the chairman of the synagogue's board. Pecherski was not only devoted to the religious needs of the congregation, he also sent petitions to the Soviet government and the municipal authorities asking to be allowed to organize courses in subjects such as Hebrew and Jewish history. These petitions were always summarily rejected. Pecherski was arrested in 1961 and sentenced to 7 years imprisonment, ostensibly for having "maintained contact with a foreign embassy [i.e Israel]." The rabbi of the synagogue, RabbiAbram Lubanov, who had been imprisoned in a forced labor camp during the Stalin era, was the dwindling congregation's spiritual leader.

In 1962-1964, as in other parts of the USSR, matzah-baking in the Leningrad synagogue was discontinued by the authorities. In 1962, on the eve of Simchat Torah, 25 Jewish youths were arrested while dancing in the street near the synagogue. In 1963 the authorities prohibited the use of the Jewish cemetery, which was ultimately closed in 1969.

In spite of the assimilation and population decline among Leningrad's Jews, they nonetheless took on an important role in the refusenik movement and the Jewish national revival that began to stir in the Soviet Union. After the Six Day War in 1967, Jewish youth more openly displayed their identification with Israel, in spite of the official Soviet anti-Israel campaign. Many began studying Hebrew in private underground groups, others protested publicly against the government's refusal to grant them exit permits for Israel. These protests were publicized abroad, and helped galvanize Jewish communities worldwide to help their Soviet brethren. Many of these activities led to the arrest and imprisonment of these young activists. Another group of young Jews, mostly from Riga, together with 2 non-Jews, were tried in Leningrad in December 1970 for allegedly planning to hijack a Soviet plane in order to land abroad and ultimately reach Israel. Two were sentenced to death, and the other to prison terms of 4-15 years. These sentences led to worldwide protests. On appeal in March, 1971, the Supreme Court of the Russian Republic commuted the death sentences to 15 years of hard labor, and some of the other sentences were reduced.

With the collapse of communism, St. Petersburg saw a Jewish communal revival. Chabad is particularly active in the city, and events such as Limmud FSU help St. Petersburg's Jews reconnect with their Jewish roots.

Place Type:
City
ID Number:
144664
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Nearby places:

Related items:
גוז'נסקי, אליהו (אליושה) (1914–1948), מהפכן, פוליטיקאי, מנהיג פועלים ומחבר, נולד בפטרוגרד, רוסיה, בן יחיד להוריו פרידה ויצחק.
____________________________________________

אליהו גוז'נסקי – ביוגרפיה מאת יורם גוז'נסקי

אביו היה עורך-דין בעל השקפת עולם דמוקרטית. ב-1917 עברה המשפחה לגרודנה (אז – פולין; היום - בלארוס), שם למד גוז'נסקי בגימנסיה הריאלית. עוד בהיותו תלמיד, ניהל ויכוחים עם המורה להיסטוריה בשאלת האנטישמיות. כבר אז נתגלתה בו הנטייה לעמוד לימין החלשים. כתלמיד גימנסיה, הצטרף לתנועת הנוער "השומר הצעיר" והגיע לארץ בשנת 1930, בהיותו בן 16, ולמד בבית הספר החקלאי מקווה ישראל עד 1933.

החיים בארץ חשפו בפניו מציאות חברתית ולאומית שונה מזו שציפה למצוא, ובהיותו תלמיד בית הספר מקווה ישראל, הצטרף לתנועת הנוער הקומוניסטי בארץ ונטל חלק פעיל בעבודת התנועה. לאחר סיום לימודיו בבית הספר החקלאי, עבד כפועל בפרדסים. עבודתו זו הביאה אותו במגע קרוב יותר עם ציבור הפועלים. אז נתגלו בו לראשונה הכשרונות האירגוניים, בהם הצטיין במשך כל שנות פעולתו.

בשנת 1936, לבקשת אביו, שב לגרודנה, כדי ללמוד שם בבית ספר למודדים מוסמכים. בגרודנה הצטרף לתנועת הנוער הקומוניסטי הפולני, שפעלה במחתרת. בפעילותו במחתרת בפולין, באו לידי גילוי אומץ רוחו של גוז'נסקי וכושר המצאתו. באחת הפעולות נאסר בידי המשטרה והועמד לדין. הוא נידון לשמונה שנות מאסר. לפי עצת אביו המשפטן, הוא ניצל את היותו נתין פלשתינאי, חמק ממאסר ושב בשנת 1938 לארץ. לאחר שובו, החל לעבוד כמודד במחנות הצבא הבריטי ולעתים כפועל בפרדסים.

עם שובו לארץ, בגיל 24, הצטרף למפלגה הקומוניסטית הפלשתינאית, שפעלה אז במחתרת. למרות הסכנה שבדבר, בכל מקום שבו עבד, ניהל תעמולה קומוניסטית בקרב הפועלים, ובייחוד בקרב העובדים במחנות הצבא. פעילות קומוניסטית, לרבות בקרב הפועלים, הייתה כרוכה באותן שנים בסיכון אישי. מאז שמועצת ההסתדרות (אפריל 1923) אימצה את הצעתו של דוד בן גוריון והחליטה להוציא מההסתדרות את כל חברי "פרקציית הפועלים", חל איסור על קבלת קומוניסטים להסתדרות. המשמעות הייתה – הרעבה והעדר שירותים רפואיים, שכן מי שהוצא מההסתדרות ב"אשמת" קומוניזם, נחסמה בפני הגישה ללשכת העבודה ולקופת חולים . ייתר-על-כן, ממשלת המנדט הבריטי, שערכה מצוד נגד קומוניסטים ואנשי שמאל, אסרה והגלתה אותם מהארץ, התייחסה למי שהוצא מן ההסתדרות כאל מי שהוכחה אשמתו בהשתייכות למפלגה הקומוניסטית הבלתי-לגלית.
גוז'נסקי היה חבר ועד הסניף התל-אביבי של המפלגה הקומוניסטית, שפעלה במחתרת. במסגרתו, פעל בקשר הדוק עם מזכיר הסניף, סיומה מירוניאנסקי, שב-1941 נרצח בידי הבולשת הבריטית. ועד הסניף הטיל עליו את האחריות לפעולה האיגוד-המקצועית בקרב הפועלים. קשריו הישירים עם הפועלים וכישוריו הארגוניים, הפכו אותו תוך פרק זמן קצר למנהיג עממי בתנועת הפועלים בארץ.
כחבר פעיל במפלגה הקומוניסטית, היה גוז'נסקי נתון למעקב ולרדיפות מצד המשטרה הבריטית. בשנת 1941, בדרכו מנתניה לתל-אביב, נעצר בידי הבולשת הבריטית ונכלא. אחרי ששוחרר מבית הסוהר, שב במישנה מרץ לארגן מאבקי פועלים להגנה על שכרם וזכויותיהם.

מנהיג של פועלי היהלומים

ב-1941, לאחר ששוחרר מהמאסר, ורוב מקומות העבודה היו בעצם סגורים בפניו, החל גוז'נסקי לעבוד כפועל יהלומים. הוא עבד במלטשת "כוכב" ובמלטשות אחרות. שנה בלבד לאחר שהחל לעבוד במלטשת יהלומים, ארגן גוז'נסקי שביתה גדולה בענף, שתנאי העבודה והארגון המקצועי בו היו ייחודיים. הוא המשיך בפעילותו המנהיגותית בקרב פועלי היהלומים במהלך השנים 1946-1942. מידת מעורבותו בשביתות של פועלי היהלומים באה לידי ביטוי ב-18 המאמרים שהקדיש לנושא זה . במקביל היה מעורה גם במאבקי פועלים במפעלי תעשייה אחרים, במאבקים של העובדים במחנות הצבא הבריטי ובקרב עובדי שירות המדינה. בשנת 1946, לאחר שנתאפשר למפלגה הקומוניסטית, שפעלה כעשרים שנה במחתרת, לשוב ולפעול בהסתדרות, היה גוז'נסקי נציגה במועצת פועלי תל-אביב.

גוז'נסקי הקדיש מאמצים רבים לגיבוש אחדות מאבק של פועלים יהודים וערבים. התנאים לכך היו מורכבים והשגת המטרה חייבה להתגבר על מכשולים רבים. שלטון המנדט הבריטי הפעיל בפלשתינה את השיטה של "הפרד ומשול", ורדף בכל האמצעים את אלה שפעלו ליישום שיתוף פעולה יהודי-ערבי במישורים החברתי והמדיני. ההנהגה הציונית, לרבות הנהגת ההסתדרות הכללית, ניהלו מדיניות קולוניאלית של היבדלות לאומית ושל דחיקת רגלי הפועלים הערבים ("עבודה עברית"). מבחינת ההתארגנות האיגוד-מקצועית, פועלים יהודים וערבים היו מאורגנים אז בדרך כלל במסגרות מקצועיות-לאומיות נפרדות.
לכן נודעה חשיבות כה רבה למערכות המשותפות, שלמרות הפיצול הארגוני, התנהלו במשותף ואיחדו, בשביתות ארציות, פועלים יהודים וערבים. גוז'נסקי היה מעורב במאמצים אלה, ותרם אישית לפרסומו של הכרוז לפועלי הממשלה השובתים, יהודים וערבים, שהוציאו יחד המפלגה הקומוניסטית הפלשתינאית והליגה לשחרור לאומי בשנת 1946.
גוז'נסקי במעקב של סוכני ההגנה

לא נמצאו יומנים או רשימות אישיות, המתארות את פעילותו היומיומית. לכן מקורות המידע הם, מצד אחד, רשימות שכתבו עליו חבריו, ומצד שני – הרשימות של סוכני ההגנה, שעקבו אחריו, כמו אחרי פעילים קומוניסטים אחרים, הן בשנים שהמפלגה הקומוניסטית פעלה במחתרת, והן בשנים שפעלה כבר בגלוי.
אחד הדיווחים של סוכנת הגנה בשם "זהבה", מספר על ביקור של גוז'נסקי במחנה של הנוער הקומוניסטי בספטמבר 1945:
"זהבה מוסרת: בימים 17-14 לספטמבר התקיים מחנה של ברית הנוער הקומוניסטית על הר הכרמל. השתתפו קרוב למאה חבר מהסניפים: חיפה, קריות ותל-אביב. משאר הסניפים לא באו חברים. במחנה ביקרו אורחים, אשר גם הירצו, והם: אסתר וילנסקה ואליושה גוז'נסקי".
בדיווח אחר כלולים דברים, שאמר גוז'נסקי בכינוס פעילים של העיתון "קול העם", שנערך במועדון המפלגה ברחוב מרכז בעלי מלאכה 26 בתל-אביב (21.12.1946). האסיפה נערכה במסגרת המאמצים המיוחדים שהשקיע בגיוס תרומות ובהערכות להוצאת "קול העם" כיומון:
"נוכחו כ-20 פעילים ממקומות שונים בארץ. פתחה את הכינוס אסתר וילנסקה, לדבריה נועד כינוס זה לסיקור תוכנית הופעתו היומיומית של 'קול העם'. אחריה הירצה אליושה, שקוראים לו גם גוז'נסקי. המרצה דיבר על הקשיים שבביצוע התוכנית. הסביר, שאי-אפשר להמשיך בהדפסת העיתון באותו בית דפוס, משום החשש שבמקרה של התנגשות בין המפלגה הקומוניסטית ובין המחנה הציוני, יפסיקו להדפיס את העיתון. מתנהל, על כן, משא-ומתן על דבר רכישת בית דפוס, הנמצא באולם גדול וצריך לעלות כ-4,700 לא"י. הכספים יגויסו על-ידי התרמת חברים: חודש משכורת מכל חבר. כן יש למצוא לדפוס, מבין חברי המפלגה, גם פועלי דפוס. את הנוער הקומוניסטי יש להדריך ולהכין להדפסת העיתון ולחלוקתו בתנאים של שעת חירום למפלגה. העיתון ישמש לא רק כלי הסברה לקהל הרחב, אלא גם קשר בל ינתק בין החברים עצמם. כולם יצטרכו לשאת באחריות העיתון ובמקרה של הפסד – יצטרכו החברים לשלם מכספם".

גוז'נסקי כאיש של כתיבה

גוז'נסקי נהג לכתוב רשימות פוליטיות-חברתיות וספרותיות כבר מגיל צעיר. לא ידוע, מתי החל לפרסם בדפוס את רשימותיו, וזאת משום שכל עוד פעלה המפלגה הקומוניסטית במחתרת, המאמרים והרשימות בעיתוני המפלגה פורסמו ללא שמות הכותבים.
הפרסומים הראשונים שהופיעו בשמו היו ביידיש, שהייתה שפת הכתיבה הראשונה שלו. בפברואר 1943, בהיותו בן 28, ראתה אור הנובלה שכתב ביידיש "נעליים למען הנקמה", שפורסמה בביטאון המפלגה "פעברואר שטאמען". במרס 1943 ראה אור מאמר חתום בשמו של גוז'נסקי בפרסום של המפלגה באידיש "מערץ שטאמען", שהוקדש לתרומת היהודים למערכה נגד הפאשיזם.
באוגוסט 1943 פירסם גוז'נסקי לראשונה מאמר חתום בשמו ב"קול העם", שהיה אז שבועון של המפלגה הקומוניסטית. המאמר הוקדש להסכם עבודה שהשיגו פועלי היהלומים ולדרכי המאבק הנחוצות להגנת שכרם וזכויותיהם.

בשש השנים שחלפו מאז הנובלה הראשונה, שראתה אור בחתימתו, ועד למותו, פירסם גוז'נסקי ב"קול העם" ובעיתונים של המפלגה ביידיש כמאה מאמרים, רשימות וסקירות, שהוקדשו בעיקר למאבקי עובדים, למצב הכלכלי-חברתי ולמדיניות ההסתדרות. במאמרים אלה הוכיח בקיאות רבה בנתונים הכלכליים, בהלכי הרוח בקרב העובדים וגם יידע תיאורטי בתחום הגישה המרקסיסטית ליחסי הון-עבודה. מאמריו מצטיינים בעובדתיות ובענייניות, ובהם באה לידי ביטוי מעורבותו במאבקים המעמדיים והבנה מעמיקה לגבי צרכיהם ודרישותיהם של הפועלים, ולגבי תנאיי המאבק בארץ קולוניאלית.
בכתיבתו כיסה גם תחומים נוספים, כמו המערכה נגד משטר הדיכוי הקולוניאלי הבריטי, המערכה לעצמאות הארץ לטובת שני העמים החיים בה, והמערכה נגד הפאשיזם והנאציזם.

נובלות, שירים ורומן

למרות שהשקיע את מיטב מרצו בפעילות האיגוד-מקצועית ובפעילות הפוליטית בשורות המפלגה הקומוניסטית, גוז'נסקי כתב גם חיבורים בעלי אופי ספרותי. ב-1944, לאחר שמקריאת ידיעה ב"הארץ" נודע לו לראשונה, כיצד ניספה אביו בגיטו גרודנה (פולין), כתב גוז'נסקי ביידיש את הנובלה "גרודנה". הנובלה פורסמה בתל-אביב ביידיש בשנת 1945, והייתה הספר הראשון והיחיד שלו שראה אור בחייו. בגרסתה העברית, ראתה אור הנובלה "גרודנה" בשנת 1978.
גוז'נסקי כתב ביידיש רומן בשם "דער מענטש האט געזיגט" ("האדם ניצח"), שיצא לאור בשיתוף פעולה בין הוצאות ספרים בפולין ובישראל רק ב-1949, לאחר מותו. הרומן יצא לאור בעברית בשנת 2011 תחת הכותרת "האדם ניצח".
נמצאו עד כה שני שירים שפירסם ביידיש, ואשר הנושא שלהם הוא המערכה נגד הנאציזם.

בשליחות פוליטית

בוועידה השמינית של המפלגה הקומוניסטית הפלשתינאית (מאי 1944) נבחר גוז'נסקי לוועד המרכזי של המפלגה.
ב-1946, יזם גוז'נסקי את החלטת הוועד המרכזי של המפלגה הקומוניסטית להפוך את "קול העם" משבועון לעיתון יומי. לאחר קבלת ההחלטה, הוא היה הרוח החיה בגיוס האמצעים והתרומות וכן בהכנות האירגוניות להפעלת המערכת, בית הדפוס ורשת המפיצים. המאמצים הוכתרו בהצלחה, העיתון החל להופיע כיומון ב-14 בפברואר 1947.
בשנים 1948-1946, מילא גוז'נסקי תפקיד מרכזי במאמצים לשיקום האחדות של הקומוניסטים היהודים והערבים בארץ. בספטמבר 1948, הודיעו שתי המסגרות – הליגה לשחרור לאומי והמפלגה הקומוניסטית הישראלית, על החלטתן להתאחד. בימים 23-22 באוקטובר 1948, התקיימה בחיפה ועידת האיחוד, אותה תיאר גוז'נסקי כמאורע החשוב ביותר בחייו.

ב-1947 התחברו יחד שתי התפתחויות: החריף המשבר בענף היהלומים, פוטרו אלפי פועלים וקשה היה למצוא בו תעסוקה; במקביל ריכזה המפלגה הקומוניסטית הפלשתינאית מאמצים רבים יותר במשימה הפוליטית - המערכה לסילוק השלטון הבריטי ולהשגת העצמאות. כתוצאה מתנאים אלה, השתנה המיקוד בפעילותו של גוז'נסקי מענייני עובדים ופעילות פנים-מפלגתית לפעילות מדינית מטעם המפלגה בארץ ובחו"ל. באותה עת החליטה הנהגת המפלגה להטיל על גוז'נסקי לבקר בארצות הדמוקרטיה העממית במזרח אירופה. במהלך נסיעותיו, שלח ל"קול העם" כתבות, בהן תיאר באופן ציורי את הדרך, את המבנה החברתי ואת הווי החיים במדינות הדמוקרטיות החדשות, שקמו לאחר הבסת שלטון הכיבוש הנאצי.

במסגרת תפקידו כשליח המפלגה, נשלח גוז'נסקי בדצמבר 1948 לפולין לייצג את המפלגה הקומוניסטית הפלשתינאית בוועידת האיחוד של שתי מפלגות הפועלים, הקומוניסטית והסוציאליסטית (פ.פ.ר. ו-פ.פ.ס). ב-21 בדצמבר 1948, בשובו מהוועידה, ניספה בתאונת מטוס בהרי הפלופונס ביוון. בן 34 היה במותו.

דרכו האחרונה

לאחר שארונו הגיע לארץ, נערכה הלווייתו בתל-אביב. בכתבה ב"קול העם" (14.1.1949), הופיע תיאור של ההלוויה, בו נכתב, בין היתר, כי המונים ליוו למנוחת עולם את אליהו גוז'נסקי, מנהיגה הדגול והאהוב של המפלגה הקומוניסטית הישראלית וחבר מליאת מועצת פועלי תל-אביב.
בהמשך נכתב, כי במשך כל הלילה וכל שעות היום עמדו ליד הארון, שהוצב במועדון המפלגה בת"א, ברחוב מרכז בעלי מלאכה 26, משמרות של חברים, אוהדים, ידידים ופועלים, אותם הדריך במלחמתם המקצועית-מעמדית.

בין הבאים לכבד את זכרו היו מונעם ג'רג'ורה, מזכיר קונגרס הפועלים הערבים בנצרת; תופיק טובי, חבר מזכירות מק"י ועורך "אל איתיחאד"; נציגי מועצת פועלי ת"א; נציגים של מפלגת מפ"ם; נציג של אגודת פועלים היהלומים; משלחות רבות של ועדי פועלים במפעלי חרושת ובמקומות עבודה ברחבי הארץ; פועלי יהלומים רבים, שעבדו ולחמו יחד עמו; אישים ואמנים, וביניהם מישה אידלברג וד"ר שמואל אייזנשטדט ורעייתו, המשוררים אלכסנדר פן ויוסף פפיירניקוב, הפסנתרן פרדריק פורטנוי והמנצח קונרד מן; הקונסולים של פולין ושל צ'כיה; נציג ועד היוצרים מגרודנה.

מסע הלוויה יצא ממועדון המפלגה לעבר בית ברנר, בית מועצת פועלי תל-אביב. הארון נישא על כתפיהם של חברי מרכז המפלגה, ולאחריו הלכו אשתו של המנוח ובנו יורם ויתר בני המשפחה. בהלוויה ההמונית צעדו שורות-שורות ילדים מברית הפיונרים, בני נוער מברית הנוער הקומוניסטי וחברי המפלגה הקומוניסטית.

בהגיע מסע הלוויה לבית ברנר, יצאו למרפסת בקומה ב' נציגי מועצת פועלי ת"א, שכטר, טובין וביאלופולסקי. פנחס טובין, שהספיד בשם המועצה, אמר בין השאר: "המנוח עלה לצמרת המפלגה הקומוניסטית הישראלית מתוך מעמד הפועלים, בו היה מושרש עמוקות ואיתו היה קשור כל שנות פעולתו. מותו הטרגי הוא אבידה כבדה למפלגה ולמעמד הפועלים. הדגלים העוטפים את ארונו הם-הם המציינים את הדרך הנכונה למעמד הפועלים".

אחריו נשא דברי הספד מאיר וילנר, מזכיר מק"י, שאמר: "אליושה היה חבר נאמן למפלגה וחבר מסור לבית הזה, לבית ברנר, למעמד הפועלים, לעם העובד ולמדינת ישראל. זכרו יהיה שמור בקרבנו לעד".
הלווייה המשיכה דרכה ברחובות ת"א וחלפה על-פני בניין הוועד הפועל של ההסתדרות. הארון הועבר למכונית עטופה שחורים ועליה דגל המפלגה. זרי פרחים כיסו את הארון. מסע הלווייה פנה לבית הקברות בנחלת יצחק. שם, ליד הקבר, נשא דברי הספד שמואל מיקוניס, המזכיר הכללי של מק"י, שאמר, בין השאר:

"על קברו הפתוח של החבר אליושה היקר, אנו נשבעים לשמור כעל בבת-עיננו על האחדות והליכוד של מפלגתנו, ולהילחם ללא לאות למען תהא מדינתנו עצמאית באמת ודמוקרטית באמת". הטקס ננעל בשירת "האינטרנציונל".
______
הערות:

1 שבתאי טבת (1980), קנאת דוד, עמודים 273, 519, הוצאת שוקן, ת"א.
2 ר' אליהו גוז'נסקי, "קום התנערה", פרדס הוצאה לאור, חיפה, 2009.
3 ארכיון ההגנה, תיק 112/158.
4 ארכיון ההגנה, תיק 112/1341, עמוד 162.

_____________________________________________
יורם גוז'נסקי, בנו של אליהו גוז'נסקי, העביר מאמר זה עבור מאגר המידע של בית התפוצות, אפריל 2011

Moshe Gurevich (1874-1944), socialist activist, born in St Petersburg, Russia, to a wealthy religious family. His grandfather Elhanan Cohen of Salant, a railroad contractor, had carried out a campaign in St Petersburg against the anti-Jewish legislation promulgated by the Czars.

Gurevich studied at the university of St Petersburg and then in Berlin, Germany, where he joined the Social Democratic Party. In Vilna, Lithuania, he joined the Bund. Between 1901 and 1903 he took part in Hirsh Lekert affair (Lekert was an illiterate shoemaker who led the workers of Vilna in an unsuccessful attempt to force the authorities to respect the workers of the city) and opposed the Independent Jewish Workers Party. He was imprisoned on account of his socialist views and activities. When released in 1905 he went to the United States as a representative of the Bund and then stayed there until his death. He was a member of the educational committee of the Workman's circle from 1920 to 1922.

Conductor and pianist. Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, he studied music there and between 1920-1922 directed the St. Petersburg Grand Opera Choir and was assistant conductor of the Opera. In 1922 he left for the United States where he formed his own orchestra, which performed his arrangements of light classical and popular compositions. He was guest conductor of many orchestras, among them the CBS Orchestra and the New York Philharmonic, and mainly the Boston Promenade Orchestra, with which he made many recordings. Kostelanetz composed music for numerous films. He died in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
Musicologist, conductor and composer. Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, he studied piano, harmony and orchestration at the conservatory in his native city. In 1923 he went to the United States and from 1925 worked as an opera coach at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester. Between 1925-1927 Slonimsky was secretary to Koussevitsky. In 1928 he founded the Boston Chamber Orchestra with which he premiered, among others, Charles Ives’ THREE PLACES IN NEW ENGLAND. He undertook numerous lecture tours and presented modern American music.
Slonimsky’s works include RUSSIAN PRELUDE for piano (1914), FIVE ADVERTISING SONGS (1925), BLACK AND WHITE for piano (1928) and MOEBIUS STRIP TEASE (1965).
As lexicographer he edited the 4th-7th editions of Thompson’s International Encyclopedia of Music and Musicians (1946-1956) and the 5th edition of Baker’s Biographical Dictionary of Musicians (1958). He is the author of Music since 1900 (1937), Music of Latin America (1945), Thesaurus of Scales and Melodic Patterns (1947) and many articles. He died in Los Angeles, California (USA).

Yuri Ahronovitch (1932-2002) conductor.

Born in 1932 in Leningrad, Russia, he became the conductor of the Yaroslav Symphony Orchestra in 1957. From 1964, he conducted the All-Union Radio and TV Symphony Orchestra in Moscow and in this position premiered many works by Soviet composers.

Ossip Solomonovich Gabrilovich (1878-1936) Pianist and conductor.

Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, he studied with Anton Rubinstein and others, and toured successfully in Europe from 1896, and in America from 1900. In 1909 he married the singer Clara Clemens, daughter of the American writer Mark Twain. A series of concerts on the historical development of various piano genres, which he gave in Europe (1912-1913) and America (1914-1915), brought him particular fame. After his immigration to the US he became principle conductor of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra (1918-1935). He also conducted, with Leopold Stokowski, the Philadelphia Orchestra (1928-1931). Gabrilovich often appeared in joint recitals with his wife, who published his biography entitled My Husband Gabrilovich (1938). He died in Detroit, Michigan.

our Open Databases
Jewish Genealogy
Family Names
Jewish Communities
Visual Documentation
Jewish Music Center
Place
אA
אA
אA
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
The Jewish Community of St. Petersburg

St. Petersburg

Санкт-Петербург; also known as Petrograd 1914-1924, and Leningrad 1924-1991

Capital of Russia until 1918. An industrial city and major port on the Baltic Sea.

CONTEMPORARY HISTORY

The Jewish community of St. Petersburg is the second-largest in Russia. Mass emigration reduced the Jewish population from 107,000 in 1989 to about 40,000 in 2002. A 2010 census revealed that these numbers did not change considerably and that the number of Jewish residents in St. Petersburg has remained at around 40,000 people. Prior to the collapse of the Soviet Union the Jews of St. Petersburg were in many ways disconnected from Jewish culture. However, since the end of communism in Russia, St. Petersburg has emerged as a vibrant Jewish community. While a significant segment of the community remains uncomfortable with, and not entirely open about, its Jewishness, an increasing number of the city's Jews identify as Jewish and have begun observing Jewish traditions and rituals.

Jews began arriving in St. Petersburg during the second half of the 19th century, primarily from the "Pale of Residence", which was made up of modern-day Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, Moldova, and Lithuania. This time was marked by intense Russification, which included a high rate of mixed marriages and conversions to Christianity. Most of the Jews of St. Petersburg have lived in the city for generations, though there are many who have arrived more recently from other locations within Russia and the region, including the Ukraine, the Caucasus, and Georgia. Since the restriction on emigration was lifted in 1989, as many as 230,000 Jews left for Israel.

Two umbrella organizations serve both the community of St. Petersburg and Russian Jewry more generally: the Federation of Jewish Organizations and Communities of Russia, and The Russian-Jewish Congress. With the support of foreign Jewish philanthropy, several Jewish welfare programs, as well as a full range of religious and educational institutions, have been developed in St. Petersburg. Russia's network of Jewish educational institutions includes four Jewish universities, which are mainly located in St. Petersburg and Moscow. A number of smaller religious and social organizations have been established by young Jews in their twenties and thirties. Events such as the Jewish festival take place annually in the community. St. Petersburg has also been host to annual events and conferences organized by Limmud FSU, an organization which specializes in meeting the cultural needs of the Jewish communities of the former Soviet Union (FSU). Since 2011 these conferences have attracted hundreds of Jews from St. Petersburg, providing a safe environment for Jewish youth to learn more about their Jewish heritage. Jewish newspapers and Russian-language media have emerged in St. Petersburg, Moscow, and other cities with smaller organized Jewish communities.

The vast majority of Russian Jewry, including the community of St. Petersburg, is secular and defines their Jewishness in cultural rather than religious terms. Of the religiously observant Jews in St. Petersburg, most are Orthodox. In an effort to support the resurgence in religious observance, many rabbis from outside Russia have been brought to St. Petersburg. The Chabad-Lubavitch movement has been very active in the community since the end of the 20th century, and the Reform and Conservative streams of Judaism have also been introduced.

The central hub of Jewish life in St. Petersburg is the Yesod Jewish Community Center (JCC). Opened in 2005, the facility houses six of the community's major Jewish organizations, including the Hesed Avraam Charity Center, Adain Lo Family Center, Hillel Student Center, the Granatik Children Center, ORT, and the Library & Eitan Jewish Education Center. Additionally, the JCC offers many cultural and educational programs. It holds lectures, sponsors events, and includes its own Sunday school.

The most notable synagogue in St. Petersburg is the Grand Choral Synagogue. Constructed in the Moorish Revival-Byzantine style between 1880 and 1888, and consecrated in 1893, the Grand Choral is the second-largest synagogue in Europe. Prior to its construction, a synagogue large enough to serve the entire Jewish community in Russia's then-capital did not exist. However, the synagogue could only be built after obtaining a building permit from Tsar Alexander II in 1869.

Located in the Russian Museum of Ethnography is an exhibit dedicated to Russian Jewry. The exhibit "History and Culture of the Jewish people of the Territory of Russia" is considered by many in the community to be the first step toward the development of a completely separate Jewish museum. As one of the city's important cultural institutions, the museum attracts visitors from all over Russia, including Jews from neighboring countries.

Another significant Jewish landmark is the Holocaust memorial, located in Tsarskoye Selo. The monument stands just 500 meters from Catherin's palace where the Jewish ghetto was located during the Second World War.

One of the oldest points of Jewish interest in the city is St. Petersburg's Jewish cemetery. Founded in 1875, the cemetery serves as the burial place for several historical figures such as the sculptor Mark Antokolsky, the 19th century scientist and Jewish community leader David Ginsburg, and Abraham Lubanov, who served as the head rabbi of the St. Petersburg Synagogue during World War II.

HISTORY

There is evidence that there were some Marranos who settled in St. Petersburg soon after it was in 1703 by Peter the Great. "The Portuguese Jew," Jan DaCosta (who was actually a converso), was one of the jesters at the royal court during the first half of the 18th century. The city's first police chief was also a converso from the Netherlands. Otherwise, Jews were not allowed to live in the city. Additionally, Czarina Elizabeth issued intolerant decrees against the Jews, and the few Jews who were living in St. Petersburg were forced to leave. Catherine II (Catherine the Great), on the other hand, was interested in attracting Jewish contractors, industrialists, and physicians to the city, and therefore issued instructions to the authorities to overlook the presence of the "useful" Jews living there with their families and assistants and had the protection of court officials. It was Catherine II who, after the partitions of Poland in the late 18th century, created the Pale of Settlement, territories in which the Jews of the Russian Empire were permitted to settle permanently (unless they had special permission to settle elsewhere).

With the partitions of Poland at the end of the 18th century, St. Petersburg became a center for the millions of Jews who were incorporated into the Russian Empire. The city quickly became a destination for upper class Jews, both the "useful" Jews—the army veterans, artisans, and wealthy merchants who had official permission to live outside of the Pale—as well as the Jews who settled in St. Petersburg illegally. The leader of Chabad Chasidism, Shneur Zalman of Lyady, was imprisoned in St. Petersburg from 1798 until 1800/1801.

The situation of the Jews worsened with the accession of Czar Nicholas I. In 1827 he issued the Statute on Conscription Duty, which imposed a draft on the Jews of Russia and cancelled the earlier provision that allowed Jews to pay a monetary random instead of submitting to the draft. The draftees would have to serve 25 years, and would fall on Jewish boys and men between the ages of 12 and 25 (as opposed to the general population, in which men 18 to 35 were eligible for the draft). The idea was to modernize and Russify the Jewish population, and became a communal crisis, particularly for the more traditional Jewish communities.

The situation shifted again with the reign of Alexander II. "Useful" Jews, such as army veterans, university graduates, artisans, and upper-class merchants were once again allowed to legally settle in St. Petersburg. By the end of Alexander II's reign in 1881 there were 17,253 Jews in St. Petersburg, making up approximately 2% of the population. Upper class Jews, including the barons of the Guenzburg family became the de facto leaders and representatives before the Central Government.

Several figures held the position of Kazyonnyy Ravin (Government-Appointed Rabbi) in St. Petersburg, including the German-born Abraham Neiman, Avram Drabkin, and Moshe Eisenstadt. Other rabbis who were not officially appointed, yet who led the Jews of the community, were Yitshak Blaser, Yekutiel Zalman Landau, and David Tevel Katzenellenbogen. After 24 years of dealing with bureaucracy and construction, the magnificent Grand Choral Synagogue was completed and consecrated in 1893. It was built in the Moorish style, and contained 1,200 seats. In spite of this triumph, it is important to note that with the opening of the Grand Choral Synagogue, all of the other existing sanctuaries needed to be closed, and their congregants were compelled to pray only in the Grand Choral Synagogue.

The Yiddish, Russian, and Hebrew Jewish presses were centered in St. Petersburg from the 1870s until the revolution in 1905. The newspapers HaMelitz (1871-1873, 1878-1904), HaYom (1886-1888). Dos Yudishes Folksblat (1881-1890) and the first Russian daily newspaper in Yiddish, Der Fraynd (1903-1908), were all published out of St. Petersburg. The city was also the center of Russian-Jewish journalism and literature. One of the most outstanding publications was the Russian-Jewish encyclopedia, Yevreyskaya Entsiklopediya, which was published in 1908.

In spite of censorship, exclusions, and unremitting police persecutions, the community continued to grow, numbering 35,000 (1.8% of the city's population) in 1914.

Many national Jewish organizations located their headquarters in St. Petersburg. The oldest of these organizations was The Society for the Promotion of Culture Among the Jews of Russia, which was founded in 1863. Others included ORT, the Jewish Colonization Association (ICA), the Chovevei Sefat Ever (renamed "Tarbut" after the 1917 Revolution), the Historical-Ethnographic Society, and the Society for Jewish Folk Music. Additionally, a number of institutions in the city housed various objects of Jewish interest. The city's Asian Museum housed a valuable Hebrew department. The Imperial Public Library contained one of the world's oldest and most important collections of Hebrew manuscripts. Under the initiative of Baron David Guenzburg, courses in Oriental Studies were opened in St. Petersburg in 1907. The concentration of public and cultural institutions in the city attracted Jewish authors and intellectuals, including A.A Harkavy, Judah Leib Katzenelson, Simon Dubnow, and father and son Michael and Eugene M. Kulisher.

World War I saw the Jewish population of Petrograd swell to more than 50,000 because of Jews fleeing from the battlefields within the Pale of Settlement, or Jews being expelled by the Russian army who accused them of collaborating with the Germans and Austrians. The influx of Jewish refugees was overwhelming to the city's Jewish residents, though they nonetheless attempted to accommodate them through organizations such as the Jewish Society for the Relief of War Victims.

After the February Revolution of 1917, all residence restrictions affecting the Jews of Petrograd were abolished. As a result, the city became a center for the activities of the diverse parties and factions within Russian Jewry. In June 1917, the Seventh Conference of the Zionist Organization of Russia was held in the city, and plans were also made to convene an All-Russian Jewish Congress in Petrograd. These improvements in Jewish life and national status were, however, short-lived. With the Bolshevik Revolution in October 1917, all Jewish political parties (along with any other non-Bolshevik parties) were forced underground. The center of government moved from Petrograd to Moscow, leaving the city's Jews far from the nation's political center. The transfer of the capital from Petrograd to Moscow in 1918, as well as the shortages and famine that affected the city during the Russian Civil War, severely shook the Jewish community, and many Jews returned to the provincial towns. It was during this difficult period that Joseph Trumpeldor created a Jewish battalion for the purposes of Jewish self-defense. Additionally, he founded the youth organization He-Halutz, to prepare Jewish youth for emigration to Palestine.

By 1920 there were 25,453 Jews (3.5% of the total population) living in Petrograd. With the consolidation of the Soviet regime, the number of Jews rapidly increased, to 52,373 in 1923 (4.9% of the total population), and 84,505 in 1926 (5.2% of the population).

A small group of Russian-Jewish intellectuals attempted to continue their literary and scientific work under the new regime. They worked to sustain their former cultural societies, and continued to publish scientific and literary periodicals. By the end of the 1920s, when these projects were shut down by the Soviet regime, many of these intellectuals left Russia, including Simon Dubnow and Saul M. Ginzburg. Nearly a decade later, by the end of the 1930s, the remaining Communist Jewish organizations had also been suppressed, as had public expressions of Jewish identity.

On the eve of the Nazi invasion, the number of Jews in Leningrad was estimated at about 200,000 people. During World War II, the Jews shared in the suffering and starvation during the German siege of the city. The author, literary critic, and historian Lidiya Yakovlevna Ginzburg was among the survivors of the siege of Leningrad.

In the census of 1959, 162,344 Jews were registered as living in Leningrad, but the real number was probably closer to 200,000. 13,728 of these respondents declared Yiddish as their mother tongue. The city's only synagogue was the Grand Choral Synagogue, which was still standing in spite of having been bombed by the Nazis in 1941 and 1943. During the 1950s Gedalia Pecherski was the chairman of the synagogue's board. Pecherski was not only devoted to the religious needs of the congregation, he also sent petitions to the Soviet government and the municipal authorities asking to be allowed to organize courses in subjects such as Hebrew and Jewish history. These petitions were always summarily rejected. Pecherski was arrested in 1961 and sentenced to 7 years imprisonment, ostensibly for having "maintained contact with a foreign embassy [i.e Israel]." The rabbi of the synagogue, RabbiAbram Lubanov, who had been imprisoned in a forced labor camp during the Stalin era, was the dwindling congregation's spiritual leader.

In 1962-1964, as in other parts of the USSR, matzah-baking in the Leningrad synagogue was discontinued by the authorities. In 1962, on the eve of Simchat Torah, 25 Jewish youths were arrested while dancing in the street near the synagogue. In 1963 the authorities prohibited the use of the Jewish cemetery, which was ultimately closed in 1969.

In spite of the assimilation and population decline among Leningrad's Jews, they nonetheless took on an important role in the refusenik movement and the Jewish national revival that began to stir in the Soviet Union. After the Six Day War in 1967, Jewish youth more openly displayed their identification with Israel, in spite of the official Soviet anti-Israel campaign. Many began studying Hebrew in private underground groups, others protested publicly against the government's refusal to grant them exit permits for Israel. These protests were publicized abroad, and helped galvanize Jewish communities worldwide to help their Soviet brethren. Many of these activities led to the arrest and imprisonment of these young activists. Another group of young Jews, mostly from Riga, together with 2 non-Jews, were tried in Leningrad in December 1970 for allegedly planning to hijack a Soviet plane in order to land abroad and ultimately reach Israel. Two were sentenced to death, and the other to prison terms of 4-15 years. These sentences led to worldwide protests. On appeal in March, 1971, the Supreme Court of the Russian Republic commuted the death sentences to 15 years of hard labor, and some of the other sentences were reduced.

With the collapse of communism, St. Petersburg saw a Jewish communal revival. Chabad is particularly active in the city, and events such as Limmud FSU help St. Petersburg's Jews reconnect with their Jewish roots.

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Gozansky, Eliyahu (Aliyosha)
גוז'נסקי, אליהו (אליושה) (1914–1948), מהפכן, פוליטיקאי, מנהיג פועלים ומחבר, נולד בפטרוגרד, רוסיה, בן יחיד להוריו פרידה ויצחק.
____________________________________________

אליהו גוז'נסקי – ביוגרפיה מאת יורם גוז'נסקי

אביו היה עורך-דין בעל השקפת עולם דמוקרטית. ב-1917 עברה המשפחה לגרודנה (אז – פולין; היום - בלארוס), שם למד גוז'נסקי בגימנסיה הריאלית. עוד בהיותו תלמיד, ניהל ויכוחים עם המורה להיסטוריה בשאלת האנטישמיות. כבר אז נתגלתה בו הנטייה לעמוד לימין החלשים. כתלמיד גימנסיה, הצטרף לתנועת הנוער "השומר הצעיר" והגיע לארץ בשנת 1930, בהיותו בן 16, ולמד בבית הספר החקלאי מקווה ישראל עד 1933.

החיים בארץ חשפו בפניו מציאות חברתית ולאומית שונה מזו שציפה למצוא, ובהיותו תלמיד בית הספר מקווה ישראל, הצטרף לתנועת הנוער הקומוניסטי בארץ ונטל חלק פעיל בעבודת התנועה. לאחר סיום לימודיו בבית הספר החקלאי, עבד כפועל בפרדסים. עבודתו זו הביאה אותו במגע קרוב יותר עם ציבור הפועלים. אז נתגלו בו לראשונה הכשרונות האירגוניים, בהם הצטיין במשך כל שנות פעולתו.

בשנת 1936, לבקשת אביו, שב לגרודנה, כדי ללמוד שם בבית ספר למודדים מוסמכים. בגרודנה הצטרף לתנועת הנוער הקומוניסטי הפולני, שפעלה במחתרת. בפעילותו במחתרת בפולין, באו לידי גילוי אומץ רוחו של גוז'נסקי וכושר המצאתו. באחת הפעולות נאסר בידי המשטרה והועמד לדין. הוא נידון לשמונה שנות מאסר. לפי עצת אביו המשפטן, הוא ניצל את היותו נתין פלשתינאי, חמק ממאסר ושב בשנת 1938 לארץ. לאחר שובו, החל לעבוד כמודד במחנות הצבא הבריטי ולעתים כפועל בפרדסים.

עם שובו לארץ, בגיל 24, הצטרף למפלגה הקומוניסטית הפלשתינאית, שפעלה אז במחתרת. למרות הסכנה שבדבר, בכל מקום שבו עבד, ניהל תעמולה קומוניסטית בקרב הפועלים, ובייחוד בקרב העובדים במחנות הצבא. פעילות קומוניסטית, לרבות בקרב הפועלים, הייתה כרוכה באותן שנים בסיכון אישי. מאז שמועצת ההסתדרות (אפריל 1923) אימצה את הצעתו של דוד בן גוריון והחליטה להוציא מההסתדרות את כל חברי "פרקציית הפועלים", חל איסור על קבלת קומוניסטים להסתדרות. המשמעות הייתה – הרעבה והעדר שירותים רפואיים, שכן מי שהוצא מההסתדרות ב"אשמת" קומוניזם, נחסמה בפני הגישה ללשכת העבודה ולקופת חולים . ייתר-על-כן, ממשלת המנדט הבריטי, שערכה מצוד נגד קומוניסטים ואנשי שמאל, אסרה והגלתה אותם מהארץ, התייחסה למי שהוצא מן ההסתדרות כאל מי שהוכחה אשמתו בהשתייכות למפלגה הקומוניסטית הבלתי-לגלית.
גוז'נסקי היה חבר ועד הסניף התל-אביבי של המפלגה הקומוניסטית, שפעלה במחתרת. במסגרתו, פעל בקשר הדוק עם מזכיר הסניף, סיומה מירוניאנסקי, שב-1941 נרצח בידי הבולשת הבריטית. ועד הסניף הטיל עליו את האחריות לפעולה האיגוד-המקצועית בקרב הפועלים. קשריו הישירים עם הפועלים וכישוריו הארגוניים, הפכו אותו תוך פרק זמן קצר למנהיג עממי בתנועת הפועלים בארץ.
כחבר פעיל במפלגה הקומוניסטית, היה גוז'נסקי נתון למעקב ולרדיפות מצד המשטרה הבריטית. בשנת 1941, בדרכו מנתניה לתל-אביב, נעצר בידי הבולשת הבריטית ונכלא. אחרי ששוחרר מבית הסוהר, שב במישנה מרץ לארגן מאבקי פועלים להגנה על שכרם וזכויותיהם.

מנהיג של פועלי היהלומים

ב-1941, לאחר ששוחרר מהמאסר, ורוב מקומות העבודה היו בעצם סגורים בפניו, החל גוז'נסקי לעבוד כפועל יהלומים. הוא עבד במלטשת "כוכב" ובמלטשות אחרות. שנה בלבד לאחר שהחל לעבוד במלטשת יהלומים, ארגן גוז'נסקי שביתה גדולה בענף, שתנאי העבודה והארגון המקצועי בו היו ייחודיים. הוא המשיך בפעילותו המנהיגותית בקרב פועלי היהלומים במהלך השנים 1946-1942. מידת מעורבותו בשביתות של פועלי היהלומים באה לידי ביטוי ב-18 המאמרים שהקדיש לנושא זה . במקביל היה מעורה גם במאבקי פועלים במפעלי תעשייה אחרים, במאבקים של העובדים במחנות הצבא הבריטי ובקרב עובדי שירות המדינה. בשנת 1946, לאחר שנתאפשר למפלגה הקומוניסטית, שפעלה כעשרים שנה במחתרת, לשוב ולפעול בהסתדרות, היה גוז'נסקי נציגה במועצת פועלי תל-אביב.

גוז'נסקי הקדיש מאמצים רבים לגיבוש אחדות מאבק של פועלים יהודים וערבים. התנאים לכך היו מורכבים והשגת המטרה חייבה להתגבר על מכשולים רבים. שלטון המנדט הבריטי הפעיל בפלשתינה את השיטה של "הפרד ומשול", ורדף בכל האמצעים את אלה שפעלו ליישום שיתוף פעולה יהודי-ערבי במישורים החברתי והמדיני. ההנהגה הציונית, לרבות הנהגת ההסתדרות הכללית, ניהלו מדיניות קולוניאלית של היבדלות לאומית ושל דחיקת רגלי הפועלים הערבים ("עבודה עברית"). מבחינת ההתארגנות האיגוד-מקצועית, פועלים יהודים וערבים היו מאורגנים אז בדרך כלל במסגרות מקצועיות-לאומיות נפרדות.
לכן נודעה חשיבות כה רבה למערכות המשותפות, שלמרות הפיצול הארגוני, התנהלו במשותף ואיחדו, בשביתות ארציות, פועלים יהודים וערבים. גוז'נסקי היה מעורב במאמצים אלה, ותרם אישית לפרסומו של הכרוז לפועלי הממשלה השובתים, יהודים וערבים, שהוציאו יחד המפלגה הקומוניסטית הפלשתינאית והליגה לשחרור לאומי בשנת 1946.
גוז'נסקי במעקב של סוכני ההגנה

לא נמצאו יומנים או רשימות אישיות, המתארות את פעילותו היומיומית. לכן מקורות המידע הם, מצד אחד, רשימות שכתבו עליו חבריו, ומצד שני – הרשימות של סוכני ההגנה, שעקבו אחריו, כמו אחרי פעילים קומוניסטים אחרים, הן בשנים שהמפלגה הקומוניסטית פעלה במחתרת, והן בשנים שפעלה כבר בגלוי.
אחד הדיווחים של סוכנת הגנה בשם "זהבה", מספר על ביקור של גוז'נסקי במחנה של הנוער הקומוניסטי בספטמבר 1945:
"זהבה מוסרת: בימים 17-14 לספטמבר התקיים מחנה של ברית הנוער הקומוניסטית על הר הכרמל. השתתפו קרוב למאה חבר מהסניפים: חיפה, קריות ותל-אביב. משאר הסניפים לא באו חברים. במחנה ביקרו אורחים, אשר גם הירצו, והם: אסתר וילנסקה ואליושה גוז'נסקי".
בדיווח אחר כלולים דברים, שאמר גוז'נסקי בכינוס פעילים של העיתון "קול העם", שנערך במועדון המפלגה ברחוב מרכז בעלי מלאכה 26 בתל-אביב (21.12.1946). האסיפה נערכה במסגרת המאמצים המיוחדים שהשקיע בגיוס תרומות ובהערכות להוצאת "קול העם" כיומון:
"נוכחו כ-20 פעילים ממקומות שונים בארץ. פתחה את הכינוס אסתר וילנסקה, לדבריה נועד כינוס זה לסיקור תוכנית הופעתו היומיומית של 'קול העם'. אחריה הירצה אליושה, שקוראים לו גם גוז'נסקי. המרצה דיבר על הקשיים שבביצוע התוכנית. הסביר, שאי-אפשר להמשיך בהדפסת העיתון באותו בית דפוס, משום החשש שבמקרה של התנגשות בין המפלגה הקומוניסטית ובין המחנה הציוני, יפסיקו להדפיס את העיתון. מתנהל, על כן, משא-ומתן על דבר רכישת בית דפוס, הנמצא באולם גדול וצריך לעלות כ-4,700 לא"י. הכספים יגויסו על-ידי התרמת חברים: חודש משכורת מכל חבר. כן יש למצוא לדפוס, מבין חברי המפלגה, גם פועלי דפוס. את הנוער הקומוניסטי יש להדריך ולהכין להדפסת העיתון ולחלוקתו בתנאים של שעת חירום למפלגה. העיתון ישמש לא רק כלי הסברה לקהל הרחב, אלא גם קשר בל ינתק בין החברים עצמם. כולם יצטרכו לשאת באחריות העיתון ובמקרה של הפסד – יצטרכו החברים לשלם מכספם".

גוז'נסקי כאיש של כתיבה

גוז'נסקי נהג לכתוב רשימות פוליטיות-חברתיות וספרותיות כבר מגיל צעיר. לא ידוע, מתי החל לפרסם בדפוס את רשימותיו, וזאת משום שכל עוד פעלה המפלגה הקומוניסטית במחתרת, המאמרים והרשימות בעיתוני המפלגה פורסמו ללא שמות הכותבים.
הפרסומים הראשונים שהופיעו בשמו היו ביידיש, שהייתה שפת הכתיבה הראשונה שלו. בפברואר 1943, בהיותו בן 28, ראתה אור הנובלה שכתב ביידיש "נעליים למען הנקמה", שפורסמה בביטאון המפלגה "פעברואר שטאמען". במרס 1943 ראה אור מאמר חתום בשמו של גוז'נסקי בפרסום של המפלגה באידיש "מערץ שטאמען", שהוקדש לתרומת היהודים למערכה נגד הפאשיזם.
באוגוסט 1943 פירסם גוז'נסקי לראשונה מאמר חתום בשמו ב"קול העם", שהיה אז שבועון של המפלגה הקומוניסטית. המאמר הוקדש להסכם עבודה שהשיגו פועלי היהלומים ולדרכי המאבק הנחוצות להגנת שכרם וזכויותיהם.

בשש השנים שחלפו מאז הנובלה הראשונה, שראתה אור בחתימתו, ועד למותו, פירסם גוז'נסקי ב"קול העם" ובעיתונים של המפלגה ביידיש כמאה מאמרים, רשימות וסקירות, שהוקדשו בעיקר למאבקי עובדים, למצב הכלכלי-חברתי ולמדיניות ההסתדרות. במאמרים אלה הוכיח בקיאות רבה בנתונים הכלכליים, בהלכי הרוח בקרב העובדים וגם יידע תיאורטי בתחום הגישה המרקסיסטית ליחסי הון-עבודה. מאמריו מצטיינים בעובדתיות ובענייניות, ובהם באה לידי ביטוי מעורבותו במאבקים המעמדיים והבנה מעמיקה לגבי צרכיהם ודרישותיהם של הפועלים, ולגבי תנאיי המאבק בארץ קולוניאלית.
בכתיבתו כיסה גם תחומים נוספים, כמו המערכה נגד משטר הדיכוי הקולוניאלי הבריטי, המערכה לעצמאות הארץ לטובת שני העמים החיים בה, והמערכה נגד הפאשיזם והנאציזם.

נובלות, שירים ורומן

למרות שהשקיע את מיטב מרצו בפעילות האיגוד-מקצועית ובפעילות הפוליטית בשורות המפלגה הקומוניסטית, גוז'נסקי כתב גם חיבורים בעלי אופי ספרותי. ב-1944, לאחר שמקריאת ידיעה ב"הארץ" נודע לו לראשונה, כיצד ניספה אביו בגיטו גרודנה (פולין), כתב גוז'נסקי ביידיש את הנובלה "גרודנה". הנובלה פורסמה בתל-אביב ביידיש בשנת 1945, והייתה הספר הראשון והיחיד שלו שראה אור בחייו. בגרסתה העברית, ראתה אור הנובלה "גרודנה" בשנת 1978.
גוז'נסקי כתב ביידיש רומן בשם "דער מענטש האט געזיגט" ("האדם ניצח"), שיצא לאור בשיתוף פעולה בין הוצאות ספרים בפולין ובישראל רק ב-1949, לאחר מותו. הרומן יצא לאור בעברית בשנת 2011 תחת הכותרת "האדם ניצח".
נמצאו עד כה שני שירים שפירסם ביידיש, ואשר הנושא שלהם הוא המערכה נגד הנאציזם.

בשליחות פוליטית

בוועידה השמינית של המפלגה הקומוניסטית הפלשתינאית (מאי 1944) נבחר גוז'נסקי לוועד המרכזי של המפלגה.
ב-1946, יזם גוז'נסקי את החלטת הוועד המרכזי של המפלגה הקומוניסטית להפוך את "קול העם" משבועון לעיתון יומי. לאחר קבלת ההחלטה, הוא היה הרוח החיה בגיוס האמצעים והתרומות וכן בהכנות האירגוניות להפעלת המערכת, בית הדפוס ורשת המפיצים. המאמצים הוכתרו בהצלחה, העיתון החל להופיע כיומון ב-14 בפברואר 1947.
בשנים 1948-1946, מילא גוז'נסקי תפקיד מרכזי במאמצים לשיקום האחדות של הקומוניסטים היהודים והערבים בארץ. בספטמבר 1948, הודיעו שתי המסגרות – הליגה לשחרור לאומי והמפלגה הקומוניסטית הישראלית, על החלטתן להתאחד. בימים 23-22 באוקטובר 1948, התקיימה בחיפה ועידת האיחוד, אותה תיאר גוז'נסקי כמאורע החשוב ביותר בחייו.

ב-1947 התחברו יחד שתי התפתחויות: החריף המשבר בענף היהלומים, פוטרו אלפי פועלים וקשה היה למצוא בו תעסוקה; במקביל ריכזה המפלגה הקומוניסטית הפלשתינאית מאמצים רבים יותר במשימה הפוליטית - המערכה לסילוק השלטון הבריטי ולהשגת העצמאות. כתוצאה מתנאים אלה, השתנה המיקוד בפעילותו של גוז'נסקי מענייני עובדים ופעילות פנים-מפלגתית לפעילות מדינית מטעם המפלגה בארץ ובחו"ל. באותה עת החליטה הנהגת המפלגה להטיל על גוז'נסקי לבקר בארצות הדמוקרטיה העממית במזרח אירופה. במהלך נסיעותיו, שלח ל"קול העם" כתבות, בהן תיאר באופן ציורי את הדרך, את המבנה החברתי ואת הווי החיים במדינות הדמוקרטיות החדשות, שקמו לאחר הבסת שלטון הכיבוש הנאצי.

במסגרת תפקידו כשליח המפלגה, נשלח גוז'נסקי בדצמבר 1948 לפולין לייצג את המפלגה הקומוניסטית הפלשתינאית בוועידת האיחוד של שתי מפלגות הפועלים, הקומוניסטית והסוציאליסטית (פ.פ.ר. ו-פ.פ.ס). ב-21 בדצמבר 1948, בשובו מהוועידה, ניספה בתאונת מטוס בהרי הפלופונס ביוון. בן 34 היה במותו.

דרכו האחרונה

לאחר שארונו הגיע לארץ, נערכה הלווייתו בתל-אביב. בכתבה ב"קול העם" (14.1.1949), הופיע תיאור של ההלוויה, בו נכתב, בין היתר, כי המונים ליוו למנוחת עולם את אליהו גוז'נסקי, מנהיגה הדגול והאהוב של המפלגה הקומוניסטית הישראלית וחבר מליאת מועצת פועלי תל-אביב.
בהמשך נכתב, כי במשך כל הלילה וכל שעות היום עמדו ליד הארון, שהוצב במועדון המפלגה בת"א, ברחוב מרכז בעלי מלאכה 26, משמרות של חברים, אוהדים, ידידים ופועלים, אותם הדריך במלחמתם המקצועית-מעמדית.

בין הבאים לכבד את זכרו היו מונעם ג'רג'ורה, מזכיר קונגרס הפועלים הערבים בנצרת; תופיק טובי, חבר מזכירות מק"י ועורך "אל איתיחאד"; נציגי מועצת פועלי ת"א; נציגים של מפלגת מפ"ם; נציג של אגודת פועלים היהלומים; משלחות רבות של ועדי פועלים במפעלי חרושת ובמקומות עבודה ברחבי הארץ; פועלי יהלומים רבים, שעבדו ולחמו יחד עמו; אישים ואמנים, וביניהם מישה אידלברג וד"ר שמואל אייזנשטדט ורעייתו, המשוררים אלכסנדר פן ויוסף פפיירניקוב, הפסנתרן פרדריק פורטנוי והמנצח קונרד מן; הקונסולים של פולין ושל צ'כיה; נציג ועד היוצרים מגרודנה.

מסע הלוויה יצא ממועדון המפלגה לעבר בית ברנר, בית מועצת פועלי תל-אביב. הארון נישא על כתפיהם של חברי מרכז המפלגה, ולאחריו הלכו אשתו של המנוח ובנו יורם ויתר בני המשפחה. בהלוויה ההמונית צעדו שורות-שורות ילדים מברית הפיונרים, בני נוער מברית הנוער הקומוניסטי וחברי המפלגה הקומוניסטית.

בהגיע מסע הלוויה לבית ברנר, יצאו למרפסת בקומה ב' נציגי מועצת פועלי ת"א, שכטר, טובין וביאלופולסקי. פנחס טובין, שהספיד בשם המועצה, אמר בין השאר: "המנוח עלה לצמרת המפלגה הקומוניסטית הישראלית מתוך מעמד הפועלים, בו היה מושרש עמוקות ואיתו היה קשור כל שנות פעולתו. מותו הטרגי הוא אבידה כבדה למפלגה ולמעמד הפועלים. הדגלים העוטפים את ארונו הם-הם המציינים את הדרך הנכונה למעמד הפועלים".

אחריו נשא דברי הספד מאיר וילנר, מזכיר מק"י, שאמר: "אליושה היה חבר נאמן למפלגה וחבר מסור לבית הזה, לבית ברנר, למעמד הפועלים, לעם העובד ולמדינת ישראל. זכרו יהיה שמור בקרבנו לעד".
הלווייה המשיכה דרכה ברחובות ת"א וחלפה על-פני בניין הוועד הפועל של ההסתדרות. הארון הועבר למכונית עטופה שחורים ועליה דגל המפלגה. זרי פרחים כיסו את הארון. מסע הלווייה פנה לבית הקברות בנחלת יצחק. שם, ליד הקבר, נשא דברי הספד שמואל מיקוניס, המזכיר הכללי של מק"י, שאמר, בין השאר:

"על קברו הפתוח של החבר אליושה היקר, אנו נשבעים לשמור כעל בבת-עיננו על האחדות והליכוד של מפלגתנו, ולהילחם ללא לאות למען תהא מדינתנו עצמאית באמת ודמוקרטית באמת". הטקס ננעל בשירת "האינטרנציונל".
______
הערות:

1 שבתאי טבת (1980), קנאת דוד, עמודים 273, 519, הוצאת שוקן, ת"א.
2 ר' אליהו גוז'נסקי, "קום התנערה", פרדס הוצאה לאור, חיפה, 2009.
3 ארכיון ההגנה, תיק 112/158.
4 ארכיון ההגנה, תיק 112/1341, עמוד 162.

_____________________________________________
יורם גוז'נסקי, בנו של אליהו גוז'נסקי, העביר מאמר זה עבור מאגר המידע של בית התפוצות, אפריל 2011
Moshe Gurevich

Moshe Gurevich (1874-1944), socialist activist, born in St Petersburg, Russia, to a wealthy religious family. His grandfather Elhanan Cohen of Salant, a railroad contractor, had carried out a campaign in St Petersburg against the anti-Jewish legislation promulgated by the Czars.

Gurevich studied at the university of St Petersburg and then in Berlin, Germany, where he joined the Social Democratic Party. In Vilna, Lithuania, he joined the Bund. Between 1901 and 1903 he took part in Hirsh Lekert affair (Lekert was an illiterate shoemaker who led the workers of Vilna in an unsuccessful attempt to force the authorities to respect the workers of the city) and opposed the Independent Jewish Workers Party. He was imprisoned on account of his socialist views and activities. When released in 1905 he went to the United States as a representative of the Bund and then stayed there until his death. He was a member of the educational committee of the Workman's circle from 1920 to 1922.

Kostelanetz, Andre
Conductor and pianist. Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, he studied music there and between 1920-1922 directed the St. Petersburg Grand Opera Choir and was assistant conductor of the Opera. In 1922 he left for the United States where he formed his own orchestra, which performed his arrangements of light classical and popular compositions. He was guest conductor of many orchestras, among them the CBS Orchestra and the New York Philharmonic, and mainly the Boston Promenade Orchestra, with which he made many recordings. Kostelanetz composed music for numerous films. He died in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
Slonimsky, Nicolas
Musicologist, conductor and composer. Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, he studied piano, harmony and orchestration at the conservatory in his native city. In 1923 he went to the United States and from 1925 worked as an opera coach at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester. Between 1925-1927 Slonimsky was secretary to Koussevitsky. In 1928 he founded the Boston Chamber Orchestra with which he premiered, among others, Charles Ives’ THREE PLACES IN NEW ENGLAND. He undertook numerous lecture tours and presented modern American music.
Slonimsky’s works include RUSSIAN PRELUDE for piano (1914), FIVE ADVERTISING SONGS (1925), BLACK AND WHITE for piano (1928) and MOEBIUS STRIP TEASE (1965).
As lexicographer he edited the 4th-7th editions of Thompson’s International Encyclopedia of Music and Musicians (1946-1956) and the 5th edition of Baker’s Biographical Dictionary of Musicians (1958). He is the author of Music since 1900 (1937), Music of Latin America (1945), Thesaurus of Scales and Melodic Patterns (1947) and many articles. He died in Los Angeles, California (USA).
Slonimsky, Sergey
Razdolina, Zlata
Maggid, Sofia
Yuri Ahronovitch

Yuri Ahronovitch (1932-2002) conductor.

Born in 1932 in Leningrad, Russia, he became the conductor of the Yaroslav Symphony Orchestra in 1957. From 1964, he conducted the All-Union Radio and TV Symphony Orchestra in Moscow and in this position premiered many works by Soviet composers.

Idelson, Israel
Ossip Solomonovich Gabrilovich

Ossip Solomonovich Gabrilovich (1878-1936) Pianist and conductor.

Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, he studied with Anton Rubinstein and others, and toured successfully in Europe from 1896, and in America from 1900. In 1909 he married the singer Clara Clemens, daughter of the American writer Mark Twain. A series of concerts on the historical development of various piano genres, which he gave in Europe (1912-1913) and America (1914-1915), brought him particular fame. After his immigration to the US he became principle conductor of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra (1918-1935). He also conducted, with Leopold Stokowski, the Philadelphia Orchestra (1928-1931). Gabrilovich often appeared in joint recitals with his wife, who published his biography entitled My Husband Gabrilovich (1938). He died in Detroit, Michigan.