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New Year Greeting Card, Switzerland, 1930. Postcard

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New Year Greeting Card.
Geneva, Switzerland, 1930.
Postcard.
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of Tamara Avneri, Geneva)
Photo period:
1930
ID Number:
143315
Image Purchase: For more details about image purchasing Click here, make sure you have the photo ID number (as appear above)
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Switzerland

Country situated in central Europe.

 

21st Century

Jewish life in Switzerland is represented by traditional, ultra-orthodox, sephardic and reform communities.

Their activities include synagogues, Jewish communities, kindergartens, schools, youth movements, kosher shops and cultural events. There are several Jewish cemeteries in various regions. The oldest is situated between Endingen and Lengnau, villages where Jews were allowed to live towards the end of the 18th century.

Jewish communities and organizations are united in the Swiss Federation of Jewish Communities founded in 1904. The Swiss Federation founded the World Jewish Congress in 1936. Jews were represented in the clock, textile, they were also prominent in the establishement of department stores such as Nordmann and in the cattle trade. The country’s first woman president, Ruth Dreifuss (1999-2000) was Jewish.

The First Zionist Congress (1897) held in the Stadt Casino Basel is commemorated with a bronze plaque on the side of the concert hall stage. The long time yearning for a return to the ancestral home became increasingly concrete in the 19th century and the First Zionist Congress with Theodor Herzl at its helm was transformative in this quest of establishing a modern state and make the desert bloom. Besides being home to the 1897 Basel Congress, this city also houses a Jewish museum.

Switzerland had a Jewish population of around 18,000 in the late 2010s with the largest communities in Zurich, Geneva and Basel.

 

Prominent Figures

The most prominent figure to have lived in Switzerland is Albert Einstein. Raised in Switzerland he studied at the Federal Polytechnic Academy in Zurich. He served as examiner at the country’s patent office. Other notables were the violinist Yehudi Menuhin, composer Ernest Bloch, poet Elias Canetti and author Albert Cohen. Also the originally German economist and social revolutionary with Polish roots, Rosa Luxemburg (1871-1919) [ˈʁoːza ˈlʊksəmbʊʁk] lived in Switzerland. She gained her PhD at the University of Zurich.

 

History

First Jews probably arrived in the area nowadays called Switzerland along with the Romans. One location where Jews settled in the 3rd century AD was in the Roman town of Augusta Raurica close to Basel.

The Swiss state was formally established in 1291, the Confoederatio Helevetica. With Ashkenazi settlement on Swiss land in the 12th and 13th centuries, the Jewish population in the area increased though by the mid-14th century the communities were still quite small. Some communities had cemeteries at the time. Jews were subjected to discriminatory laws in the Middle Age.

In the second half of the 16th century there was Jewish settlement in the area of the canton of Basel respectively southern Alsace and possibly in the Bodensee area. Jewish rural communities started to flourish in the 17th century on the Swiss border in the areas of western Alsace, Rhine valley, canton Basel and Hohenems and were occupied in cattle trade and peddling. They were however expelled at the end of the century beginning of the 18th century.

Jews were allowed to live in the villages Lengnau and Endingen in the canton of Aargau in 1776. This rule lasted for nearly 100 years. In the mid-18th century synagogues were consecrated. In the 70s Jews also settled in Neuchatel and in the area of Geneva. France and other countries started to develop an interest in securing the rights of the Jewish population and emancipation of the Jewish population started. With ongoing pressure from outside of Switzerland, Jews were permitted to settle in other locations of the country by 1866. They were gradually given civil rights and duties as per the Swiss federal constitution, however, there remained restrictions on professions. At the time there were around 553 Jews living in Switzerland.

In the late 19th early 20th century, Jews immigrated from Alsace, Germany and East Europe and Jewish life in Switzerland was blooming. The First Zionist Congress was held in the canton of Basel in 1897.

 

The Holocaust Period

Following World War I, antisemitism started to rise in Switzerland. After 1933 Jewish refugees were no longer permitted entry in spite of protest actions by politicians, church and citizens. With the annexation of Austria by Germany in March 1938, there was a wave of Jewish refugees attempting to enter Switzerland. Austrian and German Jews’ passports were marked with a J which enabled barring their entry.

During World War II the country was spared from Nazi occupation. Overall local Jews were protected by the country’s neutrality and 25,000 Jews were given protection by Switzerland.

 

Postwar

The following decades tolerance began to spread and Jews became well integrated into Swiss society. In the early post-war decades, Jews of Sephardi origin from North Africa settled down in the Geneva and Lausanne areas.

Jewish communities took care of Hungarian and Egyptian Jewish refugees fleeing after the Hungarian Uprising and Suez War of 1956, and Czechoslovak Jews fleeing after August 1968.

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Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
New Year Greeting Card, Switzerland, 1930. Postcard
New Year Greeting Card.
Geneva, Switzerland, 1930.
Postcard.
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of Tamara Avneri, Geneva)
Image Purchase: For more details about image purchasing Click here, make sure you have the photo ID number (as appear above)

Switzerland

Switzerland

Country situated in central Europe.

 

21st Century

Jewish life in Switzerland is represented by traditional, ultra-orthodox, sephardic and reform communities.

Their activities include synagogues, Jewish communities, kindergartens, schools, youth movements, kosher shops and cultural events. There are several Jewish cemeteries in various regions. The oldest is situated between Endingen and Lengnau, villages where Jews were allowed to live towards the end of the 18th century.

Jewish communities and organizations are united in the Swiss Federation of Jewish Communities founded in 1904. The Swiss Federation founded the World Jewish Congress in 1936. Jews were represented in the clock, textile, they were also prominent in the establishement of department stores such as Nordmann and in the cattle trade. The country’s first woman president, Ruth Dreifuss (1999-2000) was Jewish.

The First Zionist Congress (1897) held in the Stadt Casino Basel is commemorated with a bronze plaque on the side of the concert hall stage. The long time yearning for a return to the ancestral home became increasingly concrete in the 19th century and the First Zionist Congress with Theodor Herzl at its helm was transformative in this quest of establishing a modern state and make the desert bloom. Besides being home to the 1897 Basel Congress, this city also houses a Jewish museum.

Switzerland had a Jewish population of around 18,000 in the late 2010s with the largest communities in Zurich, Geneva and Basel.

 

Prominent Figures

The most prominent figure to have lived in Switzerland is Albert Einstein. Raised in Switzerland he studied at the Federal Polytechnic Academy in Zurich. He served as examiner at the country’s patent office. Other notables were the violinist Yehudi Menuhin, composer Ernest Bloch, poet Elias Canetti and author Albert Cohen. Also the originally German economist and social revolutionary with Polish roots, Rosa Luxemburg (1871-1919) [ˈʁoːza ˈlʊksəmbʊʁk] lived in Switzerland. She gained her PhD at the University of Zurich.

 

History

First Jews probably arrived in the area nowadays called Switzerland along with the Romans. One location where Jews settled in the 3rd century AD was in the Roman town of Augusta Raurica close to Basel.

The Swiss state was formally established in 1291, the Confoederatio Helevetica. With Ashkenazi settlement on Swiss land in the 12th and 13th centuries, the Jewish population in the area increased though by the mid-14th century the communities were still quite small. Some communities had cemeteries at the time. Jews were subjected to discriminatory laws in the Middle Age.

In the second half of the 16th century there was Jewish settlement in the area of the canton of Basel respectively southern Alsace and possibly in the Bodensee area. Jewish rural communities started to flourish in the 17th century on the Swiss border in the areas of western Alsace, Rhine valley, canton Basel and Hohenems and were occupied in cattle trade and peddling. They were however expelled at the end of the century beginning of the 18th century.

Jews were allowed to live in the villages Lengnau and Endingen in the canton of Aargau in 1776. This rule lasted for nearly 100 years. In the mid-18th century synagogues were consecrated. In the 70s Jews also settled in Neuchatel and in the area of Geneva. France and other countries started to develop an interest in securing the rights of the Jewish population and emancipation of the Jewish population started. With ongoing pressure from outside of Switzerland, Jews were permitted to settle in other locations of the country by 1866. They were gradually given civil rights and duties as per the Swiss federal constitution, however, there remained restrictions on professions. At the time there were around 553 Jews living in Switzerland.

In the late 19th early 20th century, Jews immigrated from Alsace, Germany and East Europe and Jewish life in Switzerland was blooming. The First Zionist Congress was held in the canton of Basel in 1897.

 

The Holocaust Period

Following World War I, antisemitism started to rise in Switzerland. After 1933 Jewish refugees were no longer permitted entry in spite of protest actions by politicians, church and citizens. With the annexation of Austria by Germany in March 1938, there was a wave of Jewish refugees attempting to enter Switzerland. Austrian and German Jews’ passports were marked with a J which enabled barring their entry.

During World War II the country was spared from Nazi occupation. Overall local Jews were protected by the country’s neutrality and 25,000 Jews were given protection by Switzerland.

 

Postwar

The following decades tolerance began to spread and Jews became well integrated into Swiss society. In the early post-war decades, Jews of Sephardi origin from North Africa settled down in the Geneva and Lausanne areas.

Jewish communities took care of Hungarian and Egyptian Jewish refugees fleeing after the Hungarian Uprising and Suez War of 1956, and Czechoslovak Jews fleeing after August 1968.