Search
Print
Share
Your Selected Item:
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions

The Jewish Community of Divisov

Divisov

Divišov 

A market town in the Central Bohemian Region, Benesov District, Czech Republic

Divisov was founded in 1545 and is located 8 miles (13km) east of the town of Benesov. Until 1918 the region was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire; after World War I and until 1933 it was part of the Republic of Czechoslovakia.

One of the Torah scrolls from Divisov which had been sent to the Central Jewish Museum in Prague in 1941 and which made its way to London after the war, was subsequently acquired by Temple Oheb Shalom in Baltimore.

The Jewish cemetery is owned by the Jewish community of Prague. Many of the tombstones have been preserved, as has the pre-burial house.

In 2004 the synagogue building, which had been converted into a hairdresser's shop, was reconstructed and converted into a Jewish museum. Exhibits depict the history of the Jewish community of Divisov.

HISTORY

Jews began living in Divisov during the mid-17th century and an organized community was established in 1776. Though they were not restricted to living in any particular area, most of the Jewish homes were concentrated in the northeast of the town square, on a road leading to Cesky Sternberk.

A synagogue was built during the middle of the 19th century, though beginning in 1893 it was used only during holidays and festivals. The community also included a cemetery, a Jewish school, and a mikvah. For a long time the communities of Divisov, Benesov, and Neveklov shared common institutions.

In 1893 the Jewish community of Divisov contained 250 people. At the turn of the 20th century, however, many moved to larger towns and cities, part of a larger trend in the area following the emancipation of Jews throughout the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the subsequent lifting of many social and economic restrictions. By 1921 only 128 Jews remained in Divisov. The already-small population dropped to 20 by 1930, at which point the community was dissolved.

THE HOLOCAUST

Following the Munich Agreement of September 1938, about a year before the outbreak of World War II, the Republic of Czechoslovakia was disbanded. Beginning in March 1939 Bohemia and Moravia were occupied by Nazi Germany and became a protectorate of the Third Reich, beginning a period of discrimination and violence against the Jews remaining in these regions. By the end of 1941 most of the Jews remaining in the protectorate had been concentrated in the Terezin (Theresienstadt) Ghetto. From there they were deported to concentration and death camps, mostly in Poland, where most were killed.

Before the community's deportation to the Terezin Ghetto, approximately 40 ritual objects from the community of Divisov were transferred to the Central Jewish Museum in Prague.

POSTWAR

It is not known if any of the Jews of Divisov survived the war. The building that once housed the synagogue was converted into a hairdresser's shop in 1957.

Place Type:
Town
ID Number:
136332
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Nearby places:

our Open Databases
Jewish Genealogy
Family Names
Jewish Communities
Visual Documentation
Jewish Music Center
Place
אA
אA
אA
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
The Jewish Community of Divisov

Divisov

Divišov 

A market town in the Central Bohemian Region, Benesov District, Czech Republic

Divisov was founded in 1545 and is located 8 miles (13km) east of the town of Benesov. Until 1918 the region was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire; after World War I and until 1933 it was part of the Republic of Czechoslovakia.

One of the Torah scrolls from Divisov which had been sent to the Central Jewish Museum in Prague in 1941 and which made its way to London after the war, was subsequently acquired by Temple Oheb Shalom in Baltimore.

The Jewish cemetery is owned by the Jewish community of Prague. Many of the tombstones have been preserved, as has the pre-burial house.

In 2004 the synagogue building, which had been converted into a hairdresser's shop, was reconstructed and converted into a Jewish museum. Exhibits depict the history of the Jewish community of Divisov.

HISTORY

Jews began living in Divisov during the mid-17th century and an organized community was established in 1776. Though they were not restricted to living in any particular area, most of the Jewish homes were concentrated in the northeast of the town square, on a road leading to Cesky Sternberk.

A synagogue was built during the middle of the 19th century, though beginning in 1893 it was used only during holidays and festivals. The community also included a cemetery, a Jewish school, and a mikvah. For a long time the communities of Divisov, Benesov, and Neveklov shared common institutions.

In 1893 the Jewish community of Divisov contained 250 people. At the turn of the 20th century, however, many moved to larger towns and cities, part of a larger trend in the area following the emancipation of Jews throughout the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the subsequent lifting of many social and economic restrictions. By 1921 only 128 Jews remained in Divisov. The already-small population dropped to 20 by 1930, at which point the community was dissolved.

THE HOLOCAUST

Following the Munich Agreement of September 1938, about a year before the outbreak of World War II, the Republic of Czechoslovakia was disbanded. Beginning in March 1939 Bohemia and Moravia were occupied by Nazi Germany and became a protectorate of the Third Reich, beginning a period of discrimination and violence against the Jews remaining in these regions. By the end of 1941 most of the Jews remaining in the protectorate had been concentrated in the Terezin (Theresienstadt) Ghetto. From there they were deported to concentration and death camps, mostly in Poland, where most were killed.

Before the community's deportation to the Terezin Ghetto, approximately 40 ritual objects from the community of Divisov were transferred to the Central Jewish Museum in Prague.

POSTWAR

It is not known if any of the Jews of Divisov survived the war. The building that once housed the synagogue was converted into a hairdresser's shop in 1957.

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People