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Else Cross

Else Cross (born Else Krams, married Else Gross) (1902-1987), pianist, born in Chernivtsi (Czernowitz), Ukraine (then part of Austria-Hungary). She began her music studies in Czernowitz and in her teens she was sent to Vienna, Austria. There she continued studying music history and theory. Cross studied piano with Eduard Steuermann and Anton Webern. In 1933, at the age of thirty-one she made her first solo appearance with the Wiener Konzertorchester.

In 1938, when the Nazis took over Austria, she went in exile in Great Britain. She was a teacher at various colleges in 1962 she was appointed a professor of piano at the London Royal Academy of Music in London working there until her retirement in 1982. For her outstanding interpretation of contemporary music she was awarded the Brahms Prize.

Date of birth:
1902
Date of death:
1987
Place of birth:
Chernivtsi
Personality type:
Pianist
ID Number:
135303
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
Else Cross

Else Cross (born Else Krams, married Else Gross) (1902-1987), pianist, born in Chernivtsi (Czernowitz), Ukraine (then part of Austria-Hungary). She began her music studies in Czernowitz and in her teens she was sent to Vienna, Austria. There she continued studying music history and theory. Cross studied piano with Eduard Steuermann and Anton Webern. In 1933, at the age of thirty-one she made her first solo appearance with the Wiener Konzertorchester.

In 1938, when the Nazis took over Austria, she went in exile in Great Britain. She was a teacher at various colleges in 1962 she was appointed a professor of piano at the London Royal Academy of Music in London working there until her retirement in 1982. For her outstanding interpretation of contemporary music she was awarded the Brahms Prize.

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People