Search
Print
Share
Your Selected Item:
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions

The Jewish Community of Nowy Targ

Nowy Targ

Yiddish; ניימארקט, Naymarkt; German: Neumarkt

A town and seat of Nowy Targ district in Lesser Poland Voivodeship, Poland.

Nowy Targ was established in the 13th century and received official status as a town in the year 1346, under the reign of King Casimir the Great. During the 15th century, the town became the center of royal estates, as well as the headquarters of the king's representative. Nowy Targ was located on the route of merchant caravans traveling from Hungary during the 16th century; however, because of the city's location at the foot of the Tatra Mountains, there were also groups of robbers and smugglers who traveled on the same route. Nowy Targ experienced a significant economic decline during the 16th and 17th centuries, when revolts broke out against the king and his representatives. After the division of Poland at the end of the 18th century Nowy Targ, like all of western Galicia, was incorporated into the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

The town began to recover economically, and eventually flourished again during the 19th century. It became a center of folklore for the mountain towns, as well as a production center for folklore items made of wood, leather, glass, and metal, which were marketed throughout Poland. Between the two World Wars Nowy Targ served as a tourist and recreation center.

 

History

Until 1796 Jews were forbidden to live in the Tatra Region. As a result, at the beginning of the 18th century there was a Jewish-owned tavern in Nowy Targ, and only a few Jewish families lived in the town. Once certain professional Jews were granted the right to settle in certain areas, a number of Jews came to settle in Nowy Targ, as well as in the surrounding villages. After the 1860s, however, when all Jews were granted the right to settle where they chose, Nowy Targ’s Jewish population increased substantially. In 1880 there were 464 Jews living in Nowy Targ, a number that grew to 773 by 1890. Ten years later Nowy Targ’s Jewish population was 900.

In spite of the growth of the Jewish population in Nowy Targ at the end of the 19th century, the local press during that period complained of "spiritual abandonment" and of the town’s Jews following in "the ways of the gentiles.” Nevertheless, all was not lost: at the beginning of the 20th century only 10 Jewish pupils (out of a total of 63) studied in the general school, while the rest attended Jewish schools.

Nowy Targ’s Jewish community was initially affiliated with the larger community of Nowy Sacz. The Jewish community of Nowy Targ became independent during the 1860s. The first rabbi to serve the independent community was Rabbi Yaakov Yokal, the son of Rabbi Mordecai Zev-Wolf Hirsch, author of the book Birchat Yaakov. He officiated from 1862 until his death in 1880. He was succeeded in 1885 by Rabbi Chaim Dov-Ber, the son of Rabbi Shmuel Reuven Shturch, who served until his death in 1932. His son-in-law, Rabbi Eliahu Weiss, was then appointed; he served as the community's rabbi until 1942, when he was killed by the Nazis. In 1939 Rabbi Naftali, the son of Rabbi Yehuda Unger, was also appointed rabbi in Nowy Targ.

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries most of Nowy Targ’s Jews worked as merchants, though others worked as petty tradesmen and peddlers. Much of their livelihood was based on the many tourists who visited the town. As the community became more established, workers were able to establish a number of organizations and cooperatives that would help them achieve economic success. At the beginning of the 1920s, the merchants formed a 300-member association, and established a cooperative credit association. In 1937, when Poland was experiencing an economic decline, the cooperative contributed funds from its profits towards a mutual aid fund. Laborers and clerical workers organized in 1924, followed by craftsmen who organized in 1926 into the organization Yad Charutzim. A Jewish bank, Towarystwo Zaliczkowe, which was established in Nowy Targ by Jewish investors and managed by M. Papier.

There was a particular need for Jewish workers’ associations and mutual aid organizations during the interwar period since it was a time when antisemitism rose throughout Poland. Indeed, at the end of 1918, Jews in Nowy Targ established a Jewish militia for self-defense against groups that tried to harass the Jewish community. Jews were removed from public institutions and an economic boycott was imposed against them. The Jewish professional organizations and credit unions that had been established during the 1920s were needed in the 1930s to help the Jews survive.

Nowy Targ’s Jewish population in 1910 was 1,370 out of a total population of 9,225. After World War I (1914-1918) the number of Jews in the town decreased, and in 1921 there were 1,342 Jews living in the town. This decrease was both a result of immigration, and because some of the town’s Jews were persuaded by the Polish authorities to declare their nationality as Polish, and so they were not counted in the Jewish census.

After World War I the Jewish community council established a Jewish Aid Committee, as well as a cooperative Konsom, both of which were supported by the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee. Both organizations were tasked with providing financial aid, clothing, and food for needy Jews. In 1926 the community founded a mutual aid society for the purpose of providing loans; additional aid societies and social clubs were established during this period. WIZO was responsible for the soup kitchen, distributing meals to school children, and organizing summer camps. Meanwhile, a branch of the organization Zentus, as well as the Association for the Care of Jewish Children and Youth, cared for the children of the needy.

Czytelnica Zydowska was a center of cultural activity in the community. It was active before the First World War and opened a new building in 1919. The center also housed a large library and a lecture hall, where drama groups met and evening classes were conducted for youth and adults who wanted to study Hebrew and Judaism. A Yiddish cultural society named after the poet Morris Rosenfeld began to be active in 1925. A string orchestra was also active in the town.

Nowy Targ’s first Zionist organization was established in 1898, and a branch of Bnei Zion functioned at the start of the 20th century (in 1912 it became affiliated with the Zionist Federation of Western Galicia), but Zionism became particularly active between the two World Wars. Prominent Zionist organizations in Nowy Targ included He’Atid, Ha’Avodah, and the student organization HaKoach. A branch of HaShomer HaTzair opened in 1921. Later branches of Zionist organizations included the General Zionists (as well as its youth branch, Akiva), Hitachdut, Poalei Zion, HaMizrachi, and HaShachar. Dror Freiheit had a training kibbutz in Nowy Targ that sought to prepare its young Zionists for immigration to Palestine. In total, there were approximately 200 Jewish youth who were affiliated with the various Zionist movements in Nowy Targ. These young Zionists learned Hebrew, the history of the Jewish people through a Zionist lens, as well as Zionist ideology. A number of Jews contributed to the Jewish National Fund, and participated in elections to the Zionist Congress; 376 voters from Nowy Targ took part in the 1936 elections to the Zionist Congress.

The Zionist sports leagues HaGibor and Maccabi had branches that were active in the town. Though their activities focused on winter sports (Maccabi opened a local ski slope in 1932), they also played table tennis, and other light athletics. Both clubs united in 1936 to form the Nowy Targ Jewish League for Exercise and Sports.

In addition to Zionism, Nowy Targ’s Jews were active in a number of political causes. 406 members of the community voted in the 1928 elections to the Sejm (Polish Parliament), 359 of whom voted for the Jewish National List. A branch of Agudas Yisroel was founded in 1934. Additionally, although the communist youth organization was illegal, most of its members in Nowy Targ were Jewish.  

Educational institutions included a Talmud Torah. A supplementary Hebrew school, Hebrew Cheder, opened in Nowy Targ in 1927, and was followed in 1937 by a branch of the Yavneh school. In 1931 a Jewish students’ club established a society to grant aid to Jewish students studying in Nowy Targ’s high schools.

On the eve of World War II (1939-1945) there were approximately 3,000 Jews living in Nowy Targ, out of a total population of 13,000.


The Holocaust

After the Germans occupied Nowy Targ, those Jews who had not fled east were subject to increasing persecution. Jews were not permitted to shop in the general market, while Jewish-owned shops were seized and given to Aryans. There were groups of forced laborers organized daily, but even they were luckier than those who were taken as hostages, and who were never heard from again.

The Germans appointed a Judenrat, who were responsible for registering the Jewish population, providing the Germans with forced laborers, collecting the extortion money demanded by the Germans, and otherwise providing the Nazis with any item of value that they demanded.

Nowy Targ’s Jews began to be taken to labor camps at the beginning of 1940. The first group of about 100 youths was taken to work in the quarries at Zakopane.

The Judenrat and the local branch of the JSS (a Jewish organization for mutual aid) helped the needy, opened a public kitchen, and distributed food staples and medicines, but by the beginning of 1941 the community had become impoverished.  

A ghetto was established in Nowy Targ in May 1941. Jews from other areas were sent to Nowy Targ’s ghetto, and as a result by the beginning of 1942 there were 2,500 Jewish living in the ghetto.

The first major selection took place on August 30, 1942. More than 3,000 Jews were concentrated in the local sports arena. About 80 people who were old and sick were taken and killed in the cemetery. Those deemed to be essential workers were separated; the rest were ordered to turn over their remaining valuables, after which they were taken by train to the death camp Belzec. Those who tried to hide in the ghetto were discovered and killed on the spot. Most of those who found refuge among the Poles were turned in and also killed. In addition to those who were taken to the death camp, about 150 Jews were killed in the town itself.

100 people remained who were fit for work. A few of them were sent to work in the sawmills in Czarny Dunajec, while the others remained in a local labor camp; one group of Jews was responsible for handling the Jewish property that still remained in town. In 1943 a group of young men and women tried to escape from the camp. Those who were caught were executed, while the rest of the forced laborers were moved to the Plaszow labor camp.


Postwar

After the war several survivors returned to Nowy Targ. Four were killed almost immediately by a band of Polish nationalists. As a result of Polish anti-Jewish violence, both in Nowy Targ and elsewhere, the Jews left and the community was not renewed.

The synagogue in the city center was damaged, but the structure was returned to the Jews after the war. Nonetheless, it was taken over by the authorities shortly thereafter, who turned it into a movie theater named Tatra.

The Jewish cemetery in the center of the city was originally built in 1875 and enlarged in 1933. During the war it was desecrated by the Germans, and after the war Polish residents used the tombstones to pave the streets. Approximately 40 tombstones remained in the cemetery during the postwar period. In 1990 a monument was erected by the families of those from Nowy Targ in memory of the 2,000 Jews who were killed during the war.

Place Type:
Town
ID Number:
135114
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Nearby places:

Related items:
Flag hoisting in a summer camp of scouts from Krakow,
Novy Targ, the Carpathian Mountains, Poland, 1939
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of Nahum Manor, Israel)

לימנובה

Limanowa

ביידיש: לימענעוו, בגרמנית: Hildman, Ilmann

עיירה ובירת הנפה לימנובה במחוז פולין קטן, פולין.

המקום מוזכר לראשונה בשנת 1476 בשמו הגרמני Ilman. בשנת 1565 המלך  הפולני זיגמונד השני אוגוסט העניק לתושבי המקום זכויות של עיר ופטור מתשלום מיסים למשך שלושים שנים. בראשית היה זה יישוב חקלאי שהתפתח עם הזמן בזכות הירידים והשווקים שנערכו במקוםו ומאוחר יותר גם בעקבות הקמתם של בתי מלאכה לביגוד, מזון, עיבוד מתכות ועץ. תושבי העיירה עסקו גם בסחר במשקאות חריפים ובירה עם הונגריה, שאז גבלה עם איזור זה של פולין. רק ב-1680 העיר מתועדת בשמה הפולני לימנובה.

העיר נחרבה בזמן הפלישה השבדית לממלכת פולין בין השנים 1660-1655. המקום התאושש מהחורבן רק לאחר שסופח לאימפריה האוסטרית ב-1772, בעקבות בחלוקת  פולין הראשונה בין המעצמות השכנות. הקיסר האוסטרי לאופולד השני העניק למקום זכויות יתר כדי במטרה לחזק את כלכלת העיר. בניית מסילת הרכבת ב-1884 לרוחבה של גליציה המערבית והקמת תחנת רכבת בלימנובה בשנת 1885 תרמו להתפתחותה. בשנת 1886 לימנובה הפכה למרכז מינהלי ובירת נפה. לימנובה הייתה ידועה גם בסחר בסוסים.  בשנת 1900 כל סוס רביעי בגליציה נקנה או נמכר בשוק שלה. בשנת 1907 בסמוך לעיר, בסובליני (Sowliny), חברה צרפתית בנתה בתי זיקוק לנפט, בעיר הוקם מפעל מודרני לייצור בירה והמנסרה הורחבה.

בדצמבר 1914, בזמן במלחמת העולם הראשונה (1918-1914), צבאות אוסטריה וגרמניה הדפו בקרבת לימנובה התקפה של צבא רוסיה. בעקבות הקרבות חלק גדול מהיישוב נשרף או נהרס בהפגזות. לאחר תום מלחמת העולם לימנובה נכללה בשטחה של פולין. יחד עם המעבר לעצמאות לימנובה איבדה את השווקים האוסטרים וכלכלת היישוב נפגעה. סגירת בית הזיקוק ב-1933 והמשבר הכלכלי גרמו לעליית המתחים והרעת היחסים בין האוכלוסיות השונות בעיר.

 

היהודים בלימנובה

היהודים מוזכרים לראשונה בלימנובה בשנת 1640, במסמך המבטל זכיונו של ישראל ישראלוביץ למכור אלכוהול. הוא הואשם שהכריח את תושבי המקום לקנות בירה באיכות ירודה ומכר יי"ש במחירים מופקעים. לא ידוע האם סולק מהעיר. לפי הרשומים במחצית השנייה של המאה ה-18, בלימנובה התגורר היהודי מיכאל רוז'נסקי אשר התנצר, כמוהו התנצרה ב-1761 צעירה יהודיה. היהודים תרמו לפיתוחה של העיר, במיוחד בסוף המאה ה-18, כאשר התמחו בייצור ושיווק אלכוהול ובירה, מוצרים שהיו מבוקשים גם בהונגריה. ב-1769 התגוררה בלימנובה משפחה יהודית אשר חכרה מבשלת בירה. ההעדפה במסירת החכירה של ייצור הבירה לידי היהודים מצד האצילים בעלי המקום גרמה למתחים וסכסוכים עם הבורגנות המקומית. ב-1789 התלוננו תושבי המקום הנוצרים בפני השלטונות האוסטרים על בני האצולה המקומית ודרשו לקחת מהיהודים את רשות החכירה, אולם  דרישתם נדחתה. פרט לחכירה היהודים עסקו בשחיטה, בעיבוד עורות, בפרוונות ובאפיית לחם. לפי הרשומות בראשית שלטון האוסטרים בגליציה, בלימנובה רק יהודי אחד עסק בחקלאות.

בראשית המאה ה-19 התיישבו בלימנובה שתי משפחות יהודים חשובות: גולדפינגר ובלאוגרונד. במחצית המאה ה-19 ישבו במקום 30 משפחות יהודים. ב-1850 הוקם במקום בית כנסת. אגודת חברת קדישא קנתה חלקה מחוץ ליישוב בקרבת הכפר סוליבני (Sowliny) והקימה עליה את בית העלמין. היהודים התפרנסו ממסחר בשווקים הכפריים בתבואות, בסיד שהובא מפודגוז'ה (Podgórze) ליד קרקוב, בעורות ובנוצות.שלושה יהודים חכרו בתי מרזח, היו גם חייט אחד, ייצרן סבון, מוכס, מוכר טבק ועגלון. מסילת הרכבת תרמה, כמו בכל מקום, להתאוששות כלכלית ולהזדמנויות פרנסה חדשות ואיתן גם לגידול באוכלוסיות העירוניות והיהודיות. השקעות במפעלים חדשים בלימנובה במאות ה-19 וה-20 הגדילו את מספר מקומות העבודה. בשנת 1880 בעיר התגוררו כ-880 יהודים. גידול אוכלוסיית היהודים הביא לעצמאות הקהילה ולהתנתקות מקהילת וישניץ' (Wisznicz) בסוף המאה ה-19. כרבע מיהודי לימנובה היו חסידי הצדיקים מנובי סונץ'. יתר היהודים גם הם היו אדוקים באמונתם. בקהילת לימנובה היו שלושה רבנים, שלושה בתי תפילה ומספר חדרים. חלק מילדי היהודים למדו בבית הספר הציבורי הפולני. בחברה החסידית בלט אחוז גבוה של נשים יהודיות שפירנסו את המשפחה וניהלו את כלכלת הבית בזמן שהגברים היו עסוקים בלימוד התורה. הדסה ביטרמן ניהלה דוכן בדים, אסתר הינדה ברגר עסקה בסחר קמעונאי, לברגלאס ולאסתר בירנבאום היו דוכני כולבו, טאובה שיינקורן בירקנפלד סחרה בירקות ופירות וחיה בירנבאום סחרה בעורות ומוצרי סנדלרות.

היחסים עם האוכלוסיה הנוצרית בתחילה היו תקינים, אך עם הזמן, עקב החרפת התחרות הכלכלית והתגברות התעמולה האנטישמית, המצב התדרדר. המהומות והפרעות של 1898ביהודי 1898 גליציה לא פסחו על לימנובה. בכפרים סביב לימנובה הפורעים הרסו כמה בתי מרזח של יהודים. יהודי העיר ניצלו בזכות נוכחות הצבא בעיר. לאחר כינונה של הרפובליקה הפולנית העצמאית וכניסת הלגיון הפולני ללימנובה בנובמבר 1918 התחדשו הפרעות ביהודים, אך השלטון החדש השתלט על המצב.

במפקד האוכלוסין של 1921 נמנו בלימנובה 905 יהודים מתוך 2,143 כלל האוכלוסייה  (42.2%). האוכלוסייה היהודית גדלה ב-1924 ל-1,099 איש (51.1%), אך ב-1931 נמנו במקום 1,002 יהודים (45.2%). ליהודים הייתה נציגות במועצת העיר: דר' יאן האמרשלאג נבחר לראשות העיר וייצג אותה במועצת המחוז. . בתקופה שבין שתי מלחמות העולם התקיימה בלימנובה פעילות תרבותית, פוליטית וציונית ערה. נוסדה אגודה של סוחרים יהודים, במקום פעלו כמה אגודות יהודיות לעזרה סוציאלית, הייתה קופת גמ"ח, קופה עממית, וארגון הג'וינט האמריקאי עזר בהקמת מטבח להזנת ילדים. במקום פעלו בית ספר עברי של רשת "תרבות", בית ספר יהודי ללימודי דת. בעיירה הוקמו תנועות נוער ציוניות וסניף של אירגון הנשים "ויצ"ו" שהפעיל חוג דרמה.

עם העמקת המשבר הכלכלי בשנות ה-1930, מצב היהודים החמיר. הלאומנים הפולנים קראו לחרם על המסחר עם היהודים. השטפון הגדול בשנת 1935 גרם לנזקים גדולים בעיר.

 

תקופת השואה

 ב-1 בספטמבר 1939 גרמניה הנאצית פולשה לפולין. הגרמנים כבשו את לימנובה ב-6 בספטמבר 1939. מיד החלו בחטיפות של יהודים לעבודות כפייה. ב-11 בספטמבר הגרמנים רצחו מחוץ לעיירה במורדרקה (Mordarka), ליד הדרך לנובי סונץ', 12 יהודים אמידים שהואשמו בתרומה לקרן ההגנה הלאומית הפולנית. על יהודי לימנובה הוטלו גזרות כלכליות והגבלות: על היהודים נאסר לעסוק במסחר, על ילדי היהודים נאסר ללכת לבתי הספר והיהודים חויבו לענוד על הזרוע סרט עם מגן דוד..

במרס 1940 הגיעו לעיירה כ-700 פליטים מלודז'. חלקם שוכנו בכפרי הסביבה, כ-400 מהם הועברו הלאה, לנובי סונץ'. מצב היהודים הלך והחמיר. הסניף של ה"יס.ס" - האגודה היהודים לעזרה הדדית בנובי סאנץ' (Nowy Sącz) סייע בטיפול בפליטים.

ב-1941 בכפר הסמוך סטארה וויאש (Stara Wieś) נורו למוות 167 יהודים זקנים וחולים. במאי אותה שנה, הז'נדרם באומן (Bauman), כנקמה על בריחת שני יהודים מקבוצה שהובילו אותה לעבודה שני שומרי אס.אס, רצח בבית העלמין 12 יהודים. ביולי 1941 נרצחו 70 יהודים נוספים ליד החומה ברחוב קילינסקי (Kiliński). בקייץ 1941 רוכזו כ-1,500 יהודים ברובע קמיינייץ (Kamieniec) בגטו פתוח.

בסוף שנת 1940 היו בלימנובה 895 יהודים, מהם 95 פליטים. הסניף של ה"יס.ס." בקרקוב סייע לכ-300 מהם. ביוני 1941 הוקם בלימנובה הסניף המקומי של ה"יס.ס.". בקיץ 1941 ציוו הגרמנים לרכז כ-600 מיהודי הסביבה בלימנובה ובמשאנה דולנה. התמנה יודנרט של 12 חברים בראשותו של סולו שניצר (Solo Schnitzer). בתחילת 1942 הוקם גטו מעבר עבור יהודי לימנובה והכפרים סביב. ב-20 באפריל 1942 נרצח סולו שניצר כעונש על סירובו למסור לגרמנים רשימות של יהודים זקנים וחולים, עִמו נרצחו כל חברי היודנרט. ב-4 ביוני 1942 הפך הרובע לגטו סגור. ביולי 1942 נרצחו בלימנובה כ-30 יהודים. בתחילת אוגוסט 1942 הוטל על יהודי לימנובה לשלם כנס גבוה.

ב-16 באוגוסט 1942 פורסם צוו גירוש לנובי סונץ' של יהודי הגטאות בנפה ובכללם יהודי לימנובה. אנשי הגסטאפו שבאו מנובי סונץ' והשוטרים המקומיים ריכזו את יהודי הגטו בככר העיר, אחרי סלקציה שעשו אנשי הגסטאפו מנובי סונץ' נרצחו 380 זקנים וחולים בדרך לסטארה וייש' (Stara Wieś), מקום שכבר בוצעו בו הוצאות להורג בעבר. הגרמנים העבירו 200 איש למחנה עבודה בסןבליני (Sowliny) ואת יתר היהודים, כ-750 איש, הריצו ברגל לנובי סונץ' במרחק 26 ק"מ, כאשר בדרך ירו בכל מי שכשלו או שלא היו מסוגלים לרוץ. כעבור מספר  ימים יהודי לימנובה שולחו מנובי סונץ' למחנה ההשמדה בלז'ץ. הגטו בלימנובה חוסל ב-18 באוגוסט 1942. היהודים ממחנה העבודה בסובליני (Sowliny) הועסקו בסלילת כבישים בבסיס הצבא. אחר כך גם הם הוצאו להורג ליד טימבארק (Tymbark) הסמוכה.

 

לאחר השואה

לימנובה שוחררה ב-19 בינואר 1945. בין המשחררים היה בנו של סוחר הסובין מרחוב קרקובסקה בלימנובה שפיקד על פלוגה בצבא האדום. הוא היה בין מעט השורדים שעברו ב-1939 לשטח הכיבוש הסובייטי. תוך זמן קצר הוא עזב את פולין. מעטים מיהודי לימנובה שרדו במחנות עבודה או במסתור. הקהילה לא התחדשה.

הגרמנים הרסו את בית הכנסת והחדר שהתקיים על ידו. 75% מהמצבות בבית העלמין נשדדו על ידי הגרמנים כחומר בניין. אחדות מהן שימשו כספסלים בככר העיר. גם לאחר 1945 נמשך הרס המצבות, נשארו רק 20 מצבות וכמה עשרות בסיסי קברים מתוך כ-100. בשנות ה-1970 וה-1980 שטח בית העלמין סודר וגודר. הוקמו שער ופישפש. בשנות ה-1990 הוקמו בבית העלמין שתי אנדרטאות על קברי האחים של הנרצחים על ידי הנאצים.

במוזיאון האזורי מוצגים צילומים המתארים את חיי הקהילה היהודית שהתקיימה פעם בלימנובה. הקרן "Forum Dialogu" אירגנה עבור תלמידי בתי הספר בעיירה הרצאות על ההיסטוריה היהודית ועל תולדות היהודים שהתגוררו בעבר בעיירה וגם סיורים מודרכים  באתרים היהודיים. טכסי זיכרון נערכים באתרים שבהם נרצחו היהודים.

צ'ארני דונאייץ

Czarny Dunajec

כפר שהוא גם מועצה מקומית בנפת נובי טארג, במחוז פולין קטן, פולין. הכפר שוכן על הגבול בין פולין לסלובקיה. 

היישוב מתועד לראשונה בשנת 1234. במאה ה-16 המקום היה ידוע ככפר המלך בשם דונייאץ. החל מהמאה ה-18 צ'ארני דונאייץ שימשה כמרכז מסחרי ושוק לכפרים של הסביבה. הכפרים סחרו בעיקר בצאן, גבינות, צמר ומוצרי אריגה ביתית. המקום גם שימש כאחת התחנות להברחת סחורות ואנשים דרך הגבול הסלובקי. ב-1769, שלוש שנים לפני החלוקה הראשונה של מלכות פולין בין המעצמות השכנות, אזור נובי טארג וצ'רני דונאייץ סופח לאימפריה האוסטרית. ב-31 בינואר 1831 הוענק לכפר צ'ארני דונאייץ הזכות לקיים שוק שבועי וב-1846 ניתן האישור לקיום 13 ירידים שנתיים נוספים בתמורה להשתתפותם של תושבי הכפר בדיכוי מרד האיכרים נגד האוסטרים.

ב-1859 הייתה ביישוב שרפה גדולה, בעקבותיה נפגעה כלכלת המקום וגברה ההגירה של התושבים בחיפוש אחר הפרנסה בהונגריה ואף בארה"ב. בסוף המאה ה-19 החלו באזור בהפקת כבול, חול וחצץ מהנהר צ'ארני דונאייץ. החל מ-1880 בהיותו מרכז אדמיניסטראטיבי היישוב קיבל מעמד של עיר. ב-1904 נבנתה מסילת רכבת נובי טארג- סלובקיה- הונגריה עם תחנת רכבת בצ'ארני דונאייץ. 

לאחר תום מלחמת העולם הראשונה וכינונה של פולין העצמאית, צ'ארני דונאייץ נכללה בגבולות הרפובליקה הפולינית.

בין שתי מלחמות העולם הכפר התפתח גם כמקום תיירות ונופש. תחנת הרכבת של צ'ארני דונאייץ שימשה בין שתי מלחמות העולם כתחנת הגבול עם צ'כוסלובקיה. ב-1934, בשל המשבר הכלכלי ובעקבותיו הירידה בפעילות הכלכלית נשללו מצ'ארני דונאייץ זכויות העיר.

 

היהודים בצ'ארני דונאייץ

עד שנת 1796 חל איסור על התיישבותם של היהודים באזור נובי טארג וצ'ארני דונאייץ. החל משנה הזאת, על פי אישור מיוחד של השלטון האוסטרי החלו להתיישב במקום מספר משפחות של יהודים בעלי זיכיון למסחר בטבק, אלכוהול ומלח. היהודים פעלו גם כמוכסים וחוכרים בתי מרזח. ברשומות משנת 1847 מוזכרים בצ'ארני דונאייץ סוחרים בבקר, אלכוהול וקוני קרקעות היהודים: הרש ברייטקופף, יוסף יעקובסון, יצחק והירש קורנגוט, יצחק ומנדל אונגאר, סלומון גליקסמן. ב-1860 עם ביטול האיסור על התיישבות יהודים בגליציה חל גידול באוכלוסייה היהודית בצ'ארני דונאייץ. היהודים היו סוחרים זעירים, רוכלים, בעלי מלאכה והיו גם מי שעסקו בהברחות. ב-1,880 נמנו במקום 221 יהודים (8,9%). במחצית המאה ה-19 היו ברשות הקהילה שני בתי תפילה, מקווה ומספר חדרים. היהודים השתייכו לזרם האורתודוקסי והחסידי. הוקם בית העלמין בצ'ארני דונאייץ. הקהילה הייתה כפופה לקהילת נובי טארג.

בין רבני נובי טארג שכיהנו החל מסוף המאה ה-19 גם בצ'ארני דונאייץ ידועים  הרב מרדכי ב"ר חנינא הורביץ והרב יצחק ליפשיץ ב-1912. בין שתי מלחמות העולם ליהודי צ'ארני דונאייץ היה נציג בקהילת נובי טארג.

עם סיומו של השלטון האוסטרי בנובמבר 1918 פרעו הכפריים של הסביבה ביהודי צ'ארני דונאייץ. נעצרו 10 איש מהמתפרעים. האוכלוסייה הנוצרית נמנעה מלסחור עם היהודים.

במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 1921 נמנו בצ'ארני דונאייץ 341 יהודים (14,2%). ב-1927 הקהילה גדלה ל-400 יהודים וב-1939 התגוררו בצ'ארני דונאייץ 405 יהודים (14%). למרות מספרם הקטן יחסית ההשפעה של היהודים על חיי הכפר הייתה ניכרת.

ב-1920 היהודים ברנארד שוורצבראנד ויעקב סטילר עסקו בעריכת דין בנובי טארג. בשנות ה-1930 היו בצ'ארני דונאייץ 3 עורכי דין יהודים: לייזר לאמנסדורף, שמעון פאצאנובר, וקופל שלזינגר. במקום היו 6 בעלי מפעלי תעשייה -שמעון ברונדר, יהודה שבתאי בליץ, יצחק אהרון פייט, אמיל פאוסט, אדולף הורביץ, יוסף הירש שפיץ, 4 שוחטים - חיים סלומון באכנר, משה יוסף פלאנק, יצחק גולדמן, פנחס ווייס, 7 אופים - מרדכי פאואר, סלומון גוטפראוד, וויגדור (וויקטור) הורביץ, יצחק יונס, סלומון יונס, גאורג יונס והמתלמד ברנרד לורברפלד, 5 סנדלרים - יוסף הורביץ, הרש לנגר, משה למולר, לייבוש טרפר, חיים טרפר, ו-3 חייטים -חיים קליינזאהלר, אדולף סטילר, גדליה ווייסמן. בנוסף היו 5 יהודים שעסקו בשיווק משקאות חריפים - יצחק קלוגר, פנחס כהן, יצחק קראוס, אדולף הורביץ והמסעדן יעקב לנדר. המנסרה של המקום שהעסיקה כ-200 פועלים הייתה בבעלותו של לנדאו מקרקוב. לרוב היהודים השקיעו בנדל"ן כגון מאפיות, בתי מרזח, מסעדות, חנויות, ופחות בקניית קרקעות לחקלאות.

הילדים היהודים למדו בשני בתי ספר יסודיים, אחד לבנים ואחד לבנות. ילדי העשירים למדו בנובי טארג או בקרקוב.

בין שתי מלחמות העולם הייתה ביישוב פעילות תרבותית וציונית ערה. ב-1929 הוקם בית ספר מרשת "תרבות". הוקמו החברות "לינת צדק" ו"ביקור חולים", הוקמה קופת גמ"ח אשר בשנת 1929 נתנה 45 הלוואות לנזקקים. במקום פעלו סניפים של "הציונים הכלליי, "עקיבא", "השומר הצעיר","החלוץ", אגודת החינוך "תרבות", מועדון "התחייה" שכלל ספרייה ואולם קריאה בהנהלת אנדה צייסלר מדמביצה. ב-1930 ליד מועדון "התחייה" נפתח "גן ילדים עברי". היו גם שני מועדוני ספורט יהודים - "מכבי" ו"הגיבור".

היחסים עם האוכלוסייה הנוצרית היו מתוחים ומידי פעם היו התנקשויות, אך ללא שפיכות דמים. ליהודים היו שמונה נציגים במועצה העירונית. ליד האוכלוסייה היהודית התגוררו ביישוב גם בני רומה אך להם היו מעט מאוד זכויות.

תקופת השואה

ב-1 בספטמבר 1939 גרמניה פלשה לפולין. צ'ארני דונאייץ נכבשה ב-3 בספטמבר. ב-8 בספטמבר 1939 הגרמנים הוציאו להורג שני תושבי המקום ושרפו 36 בתים.

הגרמנים התחילו מיד להתעלל באוכלוסייה היהודית, כולל חטיפות לעבודות כפייה. אמנם לא הוקם גטו במקום, אך מינואר 1940 על יהודים נאסר להחזיק רכוש והוגבלה האפשרות לצאת מהיישוב. נאסר השימוש בשפה העברית והייתה חובה על היהודים לעבוד בעבודות כפייה. במשך החודשים מאי-יוני 1941 חלק מהיהודים הועברו בקבוצות קטנות לגטו בנובי טארג. משם כולם נשלחו ביחד עם יושבי גטו נובי טארג למחנה ההשמדה בלז'ץ.

ב-20 במאי 1942 הגרמנים הרגו את יוסף להרר ואת בתו. יחד איתם הרגו את הפולני קארול חרצה (Karol Chraca) אשר סיפק להם מזון במיסתור. קברו את כולם בקבר אחים בבית העלמין המקומי.

ביולי 1942 הגרמנים רצחו בביתם את משפחת פאצאנר ובאוגוסט אותה שנה רצחו בצ'ארני דונאייץ והסביבה מעל עשרה יהודים חולים, ביניהם את גרשון יונס ואישתו, את נתן נאוגבירץ ואישתו, את הנריק באליצר עם אישתו, בתו ואביו ואת נינה קראוס.

בספטמבר 1942 הוקם בצ'ארני דונאייץ מחנה לעבודות כפייה. היהודים רוכזו בצמוד לתחנת הרכבת, ליד הדרך לנובי טארג. הובאו לשם גם כ-90 יהודים מיורדנוב (Jordanów), אוחוטניצה (Ochotnica), לימנובה (Limanowa), משנה דולנה (Mszana Dolna), שצ'אבניצה (Szczawnica), וגם כ-100 איש מאלה שעוד נותרו בנובי טארג. כולם עבדו במנסרות "הומאג" Homag בניית סככות מסתור למטוסים. במאי 1943 מחנה העבודה נסגר והאסירים שולחו למחנה ההשמדה בלז'ץ.

 

לאחר השואה

חמישה יהודים בלב מבין תושבי צ'ארני שונאייץ שרדו את השואה. היהודים לא חזרו לצ'ארני דונאייץ.

בית הכנסת חולל על ידי הגרמנים. לאחר המלחמה, במקום הגומחה של ארון הקודש הפולנים פתחו פתח לדלתות והמקום שימש כמחסן תבואות.

בית העלמין שימש את הגרמנים כמקום להוצאות להורג ולקבורת הקורבנות בקברי אחים. חלק מהמצבות נלקחו על ידי הגרמנים כחומר לחיזוק כבישים. לאחר המלחמה האוכלוסייה המקומית המשיכה בשוד המצבות, לעיתים ללא צורך ממשי בהן. נותרה על מקומה רק מצבה אחת עם כיתוב עברי ופה ושם הבסיסים מבטון על הקברים ללא המצבות. השטח כוסה בצמחיית פרא.

אחד מתושבי המקום שלח מכתב תלונה למכון ההיסטורי היהוד בוורשה ובו הוא כותב: "בצער אני רואה את ההרס המכוון של המצבות ואת המקום שבו רועות הפרות ומכוסה בערמות אשפה". דאריוש פופיילה (Dariusz Popiela), פולני, מדליסט אולימפי ועולמי בחתירת קייאקים, הקים במסגרת הקרן "פורום לדו-שיח" (Forum For Dialogue -- Forum Dialogu), עמותה בשם "אנשים, לא מיספרים" שמטרתה להנציח ולתת שמות להיהודים שנרצחו בשואה. עד היום שוקם בעזרת האמותה בית הקברות בגריבוב (Gribów) והונצחו השמות של הנרצחים על האנדרטאות בכפרים קרושצינקו נד דונאיצם (Krościenko nad Dunajcem) וגריבוב (Gribów).

דאריוש פופיילה ביקש מנכבדי צ'ארני דונאייץ, כולל הכומר המקומי, להירתם למאמץ שכנוע של תושבי האזור בצורך להחזיר לבית העלמין לפחות חלק מהמצבות הנמצאות אצל התושבים ובמשקים החקלאים.

בעבר היו בבית העלמין מאות מצבות, נמצאו רק בודדות מהן. אחת המצבות עם הציפורים שימשה כמרזב, השנייה עם המנורה הייתה בתוך קיר של רפת. הן היו במצב נורא כשנמצאו. האומנית רגינה מקושצ'יילסק חידשה את המצבות. היום הן נקיות, הכיתוב קריא ועל חלק מהמצבות האותיות נצבעו בצבע זהב. בשטח בית העלמין הוצב מגן דוד, מעשה אומן של הנפח המקומי, מיכאל שאפלרסקי (Michal Szaflarski), מתנדבים ותלמידי בית הספר בהנהלת המורה מוניקה צ'אפלה (Monika Czapla) אספו את ערימות האשפה מבית העלמין, חשפו את שרידי הקברים, הציבו שלטים עם שמות, סידרו שבילים ודאגו לניקיונו של בית העלמין.

דאריוש פופיילה גייס את הקרן של משפחת ניסנבאום ובשנת 2020 הקרן עזרה במימון גידורו של בית העלמין והקמת שער הכניסה. שיפוץ בית העלמין ערך 10 חודשים. מול השער הוקמה אנדרטה, אך על הלוח עליה לא הספיק לרישום כל שמות הנרצחים של בני המקום והסביבה. הוצבו שני לוחות נוספים משני הצדדים. חקוקים על האנדרטה שמותיהם של 494 אנשים.

סטארי סונץ'

Stary Sącz

שמות נוספים: צאנז, ביידיש אלט צאנז בפולנית

עיירה בנפת נפת נובי סונץ' במחוז פולין קטן, פולין. סטארי סונץ' נמצאת בחבל גליציה מערבית.

המקום מתועד לראשונה בשנת 1226 בשם סונץ' (Sącz) או סאנדץ' (Sandecz). היישוב היה ממוקם על דרך המסחר שהובילה מהונגריה לקרקוב. לאחר הקמת העיר החדשה, נובי סונץ' (Nowy Sącz), בקרבתה המקום נקרא Stary Sącz (סונץ' הישנה). היישוב סונץ' והאזור כולו הוענקו על ידי הנסיך בולסלב "הביישן" לאישתו ההונגריה קונגה בשנת 1257. ב-1273 המקום קיבל מעמד של עיר. העיר התפתחה עם הקמת המנזר ע"ש "קלארה הקדושה" ב-1280. במנזר בילתה הנסיכה קונגה את 13 שנותיה האחרונות. המנזר היה גם מקום התבודדותה של המלכה יאדביגה אשת המלך וולאדיסלב יאגללו. גם האלמנות של העצולה הגבוהה הפולנית נהגו להתבודד בו. עם הזמן המנזר קיבל מעמד של קדושה מיוחדת והיה למקום לעליה לרגל של הקתולים רבים.

סטארי סונץ' סבלה רבות משרפות ושיטפונות שגרמו הנהרות הסובבים אותה. השרפה הגדולה של 1795 כמעט כילתה את העיר.

ב-1772, בחלוקתה הראשונה של פולין בין המעצמות השכנות, סטארי סונץ' נכללה באזור אשר סופח לאימפריה האוסטרית ואשר ידוע בשם גליציה מערבית.

בתום מלחמת העולם הראשונה בשנת 1918, סטארי סונץ' נכלל בגבולות פולין העצמאית.

 

היהודים בסטארי סונץ'

היהודים ראשונים הגיעו למקום בשנת 1469. לאחר שנת 1673 הגיעו לנובי סונץ' ולסטארי סונץ' יהודים מווישניץ' (Wiśnicz). היהודים התיישבו בווישניץ אשר הייתה בבעלותם של האצילים לבית לובומירסקי לאחר שגורשו מבוכניה (Bochnia) בשנת 1606. הקהילה היהודית בסטארי סונץ' התגבשה רק בסוף המאה ה-18. היהודים העדיפו את העסקים  בנובי סונץ' הסמוכה המפותחת יותר והעשירה יותר. עם ביטול ההגבלות על התיישבות  יהודים בערי גליציה בשנת 1860 התבססה במקום קהילה עצמאית. בשנת 1876 נבנה בית כנסת במקום. בסטארי סונץ' לא הוקם בית עלמין, את הנפטרים הובילו על עגלת של חברה קדישה לבית הקברות של נובי סונץ'. ב-1880 נמנו במקום 312 יהודים מתוך 3,790 תושבים (8.2%). היהודים עסקו בעיקר במסחר זעיר, ברוכלות בכפרי הסביבה, מקצתם היו  פונדקאים, ואחרים היו בעלי מלאכה, בעיקר בחייטים, קצבים ואופים.

בשנת 1898 עבר על האזור גל מהומות אנטישמיות של האיכרים אשר תחילתו בווייליצ'קה  Wieliczka בעקבות ההסתה של הכמרים אנדז'יי שפונדר ( Andrzej Szponder) וסטניסלב סטויאלובסקי (Stanisław Stojałowski). הפרעות לא פסחו על היישוב היהודי בסטארי סונץ'. במוצאי השבת ב-25 ביוני 1898 האיכרים המתפרעים הפכו את הדוכנים של הסוחרים היהודים בשוק, בזזו את חנויות היהודים, את מחסן המשקאות החריפים ורוקנו את מחסני התבואה שלהם והעלו אותם באש. כמן כן, התארגנה תנועה לאומנית נוצרית של האיכרים אשר יצאה בקריאה לא לקנות אצל היהודים. ב-1910 הוקמו קאופרטיבים פולניים למסחר שפגעו בפרנסת היהודים.

רבני המקום נמנו עם שושלת האדמו"רים של צאנז ממשפחת הלברשטם. הראשון בהם שהתמנה לתפקיד בשנת 1876 היה הרב אשר מאיר בן הרב יוסף זאב הלברשטם. ב-1885 כיהן ברבנות הרב יחיאל בנו של הרב משה הלברשטם. ב-1904 ירש את כסא הרבנות בנו בכורו, אחרון הרבנים, הרב אביגדור צבי שניספה בשואה.

עם הכנסת לימודי חובה באימפריה האוסטרית, נפתח בסטארי סונץ' בית ספר יסודי ובית ספר לסנדלרות. ב-1909 היו בשני בתי הספר 130 תלמידים, לא היה ביניהם אף ילד יהודי. ילדי היהודים למדו או ב"חדרים" או כ"בחורי גמרא" בבית מדרש. ב-1906 נבנה בית כנסת חדש במקום הישן שפורק ב-1902. ב-1910 נמנו במקום 666 יהודים (13%). החל מ-1915 התחיל להתארגן בסטארי סונץ' חוג של נוער ציוני "בני ציון", אך עד מהרה של עבר הסניף לנובי סונץ'.

בתום מלחמת העולם הראשונה בשנת 1918 וכינונה של הרפובליקה הפולנית העצמאית,  היישוב היהודי התרושש. רבים מבני הנוער עזבו את הישוב וחיפשו את עתידם במקומות אחרים בפולין או מעבר לים. במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 1921 נמנו בסטארי סונץ' 553 יהודים (12%). היהודים עסקו במסחר זעיר ובמלאכה, במיוחד בפרוונות, סנדלרות וחייטות. במקום פעל בית ספר לסנדלרות הידוע בכל גאליציה. ב-1927 נבחרו לראשונה למועצה האזורית של סטארי סונץ' שני יהודים ציונים. בראשית שנות ה-1930 הוקמה קופת גמ"ח אשר בשנת 1937 העניקה הלוואות ל-135 נזקקים.

בין שתי מלחמות העולם גברה בסטארי סונץ' הפעילות התרבותית והפוליטית. התארגנו סניפים של התנועות הציוניות "הציונים הכללים", "ארץ ישראל העובדת", הרביזיוניסטים, "בני עקיבא", "הנוער הציוני", ו"המזרחי". נפתחו קורסים ללימוד השפה העברית והוקמו מועדוני ספורט וחוג לדרמה. במקום פעל סניף מועדון הספורט "מכבי".

בשנת 1939 ישבו בסטארי סונץ' 553 יהודים.

 

תקופת השואה

ב-1 בספטמבר 1939 גרמניה פלשה לפולין. ב-6 בספטמבר הגרמנים כבשו את סטארי סונץ'. מיד התחילו חטיפות יהודים לעבודות כפייה לביצוע תיקון הכבישים ונזקי הקרבות. ב-17 בספטמבר 1939 ברית המועצות פלשה לפולין וכבשה את שטחי מזרח פולין עד לעיר לובלין. חלק מצעירי היהודים של סטארי סונץ' עברו לשטח הכיבוש הסובייטי, אך לאחר נסיגת הכוחות הסובייטים מאזור לובלין על פי הסכמי מולוטוב-ריבמטרופ בין ברה"מ לגרמניה הנאצית לחלוקת פולין, רוב הצעירים חזרו לסטארי סונץ' באזור הכיבוש הגרמני. עד מהרה הוטלו על היהודים הגבלות תנועה, היהודים נדרשו לשלם סכומים גדולים כדמי כופר, אולצו לשאת סרט עם מגן דוד על השרבול, ונאסרה עליהם לצאת מהבתים ללא אישור. בסוף 1939 הוקם יודנראט, שאחד מתפקידיו היה לספק אנשים לעבודות כפייה. צעירים יהודים נשלחו למחנות עבודה. בסוף סתיו 1940 היו בסטארי סונץ' 542 יהודים, ביניהם 148 עקורים מיישובים אחרים באזור.

 באפריל 1941 היודנראט בעזרת ה-י.ס.ס (האירגון לעזרה הדדית מקרקוב) אירגן עזרה לאוכלוסייה הנזקקת. בין פעילי הסניף של היס.ס. היו הנריק פינדר וד"ר ארנסט אדר. 85 יהודים קיבלו ארוחות חמות. כמו כן, היודנראט הושיט עזרה דחופה ל-250 יהודים. חלק מהיהודים עבדו במשקים החלאים באזור ובמפעלים החיוניים לגרמנים.

ב-13 בספטמבר 1941 נורו למוות עשרים נשים יהודיות. הגטו בסטארי סונץ' הוקם באביב 1942 ורוכזו בו כ-1,000 יהודים ביניהם גם יהודים מיישובים אחרים, ביניהם ריטרו (Rytro) -  בשנת 1935 התגוררו בריטרו 45 יהודים, פיבניצ'נה זדרוי (Piwniczna-Zdrój), שבה התגוררו 226 יהודים, וסטאדלה (Stadła), שבה חיו 3 יהודים.  תנאי המחיה והתברואה בגטו היו גרועים. ביולי 1942 מתו ממגפות הטיפוס ואדמת כמה עשרות יהודים. ב-17 באוגוסט 1942 הגרמנים ריכזו את יהודי הגטו ונאמר להם נאמר שהם עוברים לגטו בנובי סונץ'. 95 יהודים, החולים והזקנים, שלא יכלו לעבור ברגל את הדרך של 10 הק"מ לגטו בנובי סונץ' נרצחו ונקברו ביער פיאסקי ( Piaski) הסמוך. כל היתר הוכנסו לגטו בנובי סונץ'. קבוצה של 40 צעירים מסטארי סונץ' נשלחה למחנה עבודה והיהודים הנותרים, ביחד עם רוב יושבי הגטו בנובי סונץ', נשלחו בשלושה טרנספורטים למחנה ההשמדה בלז'ץ בין 25 ל-28 באוגוסט 1942.

ב-1944 הוקם סטארי סונץ' מחנה עבודה שבו הוחזקו שבויי מלחמה סובייטים ושני מחנות לעבודת כפייה שבו הוחזקו כמה אלפי אנשים.

 

לאחר השואה

בניין בית הכנסת לשעבר משמש כבית משרדים ובתי מלאכה.בבניין המקווה פועל היום בית דפוס.באתר קבר האחים ביער פיאסקי הוקמה אנדרטה מאבן גרנית ועליה לוח זיכרון בשפה הפולנית: "במקום הזה ב-17 באוגוסט שנת 1942 הנאצים הגרמנים ירו למוות ב-95 יהודים מהגטו של סטארי סונץ'." במוזיאון האזורי של סטארי סונץ' מוצגים מספר פריטי יודאיקה, ביניהם תלמוד בבלי בהוצאת ווילנא משנת 1930, תמונות ארכיון של תושבי סטארי סונץ'- איזידור אופוצ'ינסקי והלינה פינדר, "זגג יהודי" - ציור של הצייר אנטוני קרילוב ובובות בדמות יהודים מתפללים מעשה ידיהם של אמנים עממיים מקומיים.

 

ב-2010 הקרן "פורום דיאלוגו" (Forum Dialogu), שמטרתה ללמד את בני הנוער על העבר היהודי של פולין, ערכה מספר סדנאות עבור ילדי בתי ספר בסטארי סונץ' בהם הירצו על התושבים היהודים של העיירה שלהם, על ההיסטוריה, הדת והמנהגים שלהם. אחר כך התלמידים ביקרו במקומות ואתרים יהודיים בעבר, כגון בניין בית הכנסת והמקווה. כמו כן,  נערך טכס זכרון בהשתתפות תלמידי בתי הספר ליד האנדרטה לזכרם של 95 יהודים שנרצחו ביער פיאסקי. 

Jordanów

Jordanow, a small town on the river Skawa, in Sucha County, Lesser Poland Voivodeship, Poland.

In the year 1564, Spytek Wawrzyniec Jordan received permission from the king of Poland, Sigismund II Augustus, to establish a city at the crossroads that led from Silesia to eastern Poland and from Krakow to Hungary ("the Salt Road"). The city was named after its founder. At the annual fairs that took place there, they traded in cattle.

After the first partition of Poland in 1772, Jordanow was included in the area that was annexed by the Austrian Empire as part of Western Galicia. In 1858, the Austrian Emperor Franz Joseph visited Jordanow. In 1884, a train station was built, and the town turned into a medical retreat and vacation destination. In 1930, there were 5,000 vacationers registered there.

On September 1, 1939, German and Slovokian troops crossed the southern border of Poland. As a result of powerful battles with the Polish forces in the area, the town suffered great destruction. In addition, battles for liberation of Poland between the Soviet Army and the Germans in January 1945 added to the destruction of 75% of the settlement.

The Jews in Jordanow

With the establishment of the city, Jewish merchants began to arrive only for the fair days, and after paying a special tax.

Until 1744, Jews were limited in business, and were specifically prohibited from dealing in salt. After the annexation of southern Poland to Austria in 1772, the business and settlement restrictions on the Jews were removed. Jews began to settle around Jordanow, especially the lands of Mąkacz, which today are within the boundaries of the town.

In Mąkacz, a cemetery was established which also served the Jews that lived in nearby settlements: Sucha, Makow, and Zawoja. In 1869, a governmental Jewish school was established, with one teacher who taught 20 students who were residents of the town and nearby villages.

In the second half of the 19th century, an organized community was established. The communities in Rabka and Makow Podhalanski became affiliated with Jordanow. In 1870, a synagogue and mikveh were built in the center of town.

A. Freundlich was appointed head of the community and served in that position until 1936. In 1887, Rabbi Israel Ber Naftali Hertz Schreiber was appointed as rabbi for Jordanow, Rabka and Makow, and he held that position until 1929. After his death, his son-in-law, Rabbi Elkana Ber Tzvi Yehuda Zoberman, inherited his position, and he served until September, 1939. After the German occupation, Rabbi Zoberman escaped to Lvov, which by then was under Soviet control, and from there he was exiled to Siberia in the Soviet Union.

At the end of the First World War (1914-1918), Jordanow was included in the territory of the Republic of Poland.

In the population census of 1921, 238 Jews were counted in the town, who constituted 16% of all the residents. Between the two World Wars, the Jews made a living from commerce, including cattle and textiles. In addition, there were Jewish craftsmen in the town. Other Jews were employed in rest homes and summer camps.

There were cultural and Zionistic activities. Most of the Orthodox Jews supported the Agudat Israel, but there were also active branches of the General Zionists and of the underground Communist Party. Participation in the activities of local branches of the organized youth, Akiva and Shomer Hatzair, was open to the convalescents and vacationers that were staying in town.

In 1921, a joint association of Jewish and Polish merchants was organized in Jordanow. Of the 35 members, the Zionists were 50%, representatives of the Polish City Club were 40%, and the Orthodox Jews were 10%. Joseph Kukla and Simon Friedhaber were appointed as managers of the group, with the assistance of Isaac Sternberg and Mieczysław Warzinski. In 1936, A. Freudlich, after he left the leadership of the community council, initiated the establishment of a charity fund (Gemilut Hasadim) to help those in need. The Jewish schools in Krakow and its surroundings regularly sent their students to summer resorts in Jordanow. Starting in 1932, students of the Tachkimoni secondary school for boys in Krakow went to summer resorts in Jordanow.

On the eve of the Second World War, there were 354 Jews in Jordanow.

 

The Holocaust

On September 1, 1939, Nazi Germany invaded Poland. Jordanow was captured by the Germans on September 3, 1939. Their tanks fired at the houses surrounding the city square and seeded destruction. The residents were prohibited from putting out the many fires. The town was left largely destroyed, and the German soldiers spread out among the houses, plundering whatever they put their hands on. At the same time, the number of Jews, including refugees that were concentrated in Jordanow, increased to approximately 400 individuals. Very quickly the Germans coerced the Jews into forced labor to clear out the ruins and the roadways. At the end of December 1939, the Jews who lost their homes and the refugees who continued to flow to the town concentrated together in the Chrobacze district, where they suffered from crowded conditions, cold, and starvation. The Jews were commanded to wear an armband with a Magen David. In February 1940, the Judenrat was appointed, with Erwin Kegal at its head. All Jews between the ages of 14 and 60 were put into forced labor. The Judenrat and the local community volunteered to help the needy refugees. On June 15, 1941, a branch of the Jewish Social Self- Help (JSS) was set up in Jordanow. The JSS was a Jewish organization of mutual help, whose center was in Krakow. With its assistance, a communal kitchen was set up. In February 1942, 170 people were helped by it.

In December 1941, after the United States joined the war against Germany, the Germans arrested members of the Feig family, who were subjects of the United States, and murdered them. Additional Jewish families were murdered: Ross, Gron, Sheingut, and Zolman.

After the German invasion of the Soviet Union on June 22,1941, the Germans murdered a number of Jewish families from the town. On August 20,1942, the Judenrat in Jordanow was forced to pay a ransom of 300,000 zloty. The Judenrat demanded that all Jews participate in the payment. There were people who sold the gold teeth in their mouths in order to make the payment. The ransom money was collected in time. On August 26,1942, the day members of the Judenrat handed over the ransom money to the authorities in Nowy Targ, the Germans raided the villages around Jordanow: Bystra, Naprawa, Osielec, and others. All of the Jews there were murdered.

On August 28 - 29, 1942, the German police and local Poles brought together all the Jews of Jordanow in the city square. 67 elderly people, mothers of infants, and children were led outside of the Strącze Quarter where they were murdered and buried in a common grave. The remainder, more than 400 Jews, were led on foot to Maków Podhalański, and from there they were sent to Belzec extermination camp. The Jews that succeeded in fleeing from the Aktie to the forest were captured after an extended pursuit, and they were murdered. An especially active participant in the pursuit after the hiding Jews was a Polish policeman named Wilczek. He was sentenced to death by the Polish underground Armia Krajowa. The fighters of the underground attempted to kill him. He was wounded and died from his wounds in a hospital in Rabka on October 30,1944.

After the Holocaust

Jordanow was freed by the Soviet Army on January 29, 1945. Because of the battles, the town was again struck hard. Approximately 72% of its structures were destroyed during the years 1939 to 1945.

A few Jews who hid succeeded in surviving with the help of Polish families. The family Jaskółka from the village of Bystra was awarded the title "Righteous Among the Nations" by Yad Vashem.

Those who were rescued could not return to Jordanow because of the anti-Communist activities of the Polish Underground in the area, who did not lay down their weapons until 1950.

Rabbi Elkana, who was exiled by the Soviets to Siberia, moved to Kazakhstan in 1941, where he took the position of dayan and teacher for Jewish refugees in Kyzyl Orda. He returned to Poland in 1946, and was appointed rabbi in the city of Walbrzych in Lower Silesia. In 1948, he immigrated to the United States.

The synagogue in the center of the city was destroyed by the Germans down to its foundation. Today, in its place, there is a residential home. The cemetery of Jordanow was also destroyed. Most of the marble matzevot were taken from the cemetery, under the command of SS Untersturmfuhrer Wilhelm Rosenbaum, and used to build the beautiful stairs of the Villa Traska in Rabka, in which resided the Schule der Sicherheitspolizei und SD im GG. - a school for the officers of the German security forces in the General Governorate. Other monuments were used to reinforce the banks of the river Gorzki Potok, in the town of Rabka.

In the cemetery, isolated monuments survived as well as parts of the concrete bases and remnants of monuments and remnants of the fence that surrounded the cemetery. After the war, the local population continued to plunder the matzevot.

In the area of the cemetery, there are mass graves of Jews killed locally or killed elsewhere and brought to the cemetery for burial in a common grave. After the war, remnants of Jews who had been buried after the murder at Stracze were brought to a common grave in the Jewish cemetery. The shallow grave was hastily dug in the middle of the main path. Even now it's possible to see among the blossoming wild flowers the depression that was left after covering the grave. In the cemetery there is another unmarked common grave of Jews. Maria Richlik, a witness to the murder, described what happened: "On a freezing day in January, two families of Jews were brought to the cemetery and commanded to undress. After a search, they found nothing on them, and so began to beat them cruelly, kicking them until they would die. The Starkenberg family lay on the ground. The father was still holding his small child in his hands...as long as someone was showing signs of life the Germans stomped on them with their shoes until they stopped moving…" In 1993, Stanislaw Targosz wrote about the murder in the Stracze Quarter in the newspaper Rolnicza Gazette: "they stood the Jews in a meadow, next to the grave on which they placed a board. The people, in turn, got up on the board, a shot was fired, and the victims fell to the bottom of the grave. Some of them were still alive, the bodies still trembling in pain, when a layer of lime was poured on them…" A marble monument with a memorial plaque to the Jews who were murdered was erected at the site of the mass murder that took place in the Strącze district in August 1942.

משאנה דולנה

Mszana Dolna

ביידיש: אמשענע

עיירה בנפת לימנובה (Limanowa) במחוז פולין קטן, פולין.

היישוב מתועד לראשונה בשנת 1365, בשנת 1369 המלך הפולני קאזימיר הגדול מעניק ל משאנה דולנה זכויות עיר. השם "דולנה" ("תחתית") נוסף כדי להבדיל את מקום מיישוב שכן שקיבל זכויות באותו הזמן ונקרא משאנה גורנה ( Mszana Górna  - משאנה עילית). במשך הזמן שני היישובים התאחדו למועצה אחת. מיקומה של העיר על דרך המסחר בין פולין להונגריה והזכות לקיים ירידידים תרמו לשגשוגו של היישובץ בזמן פלישת השבדים לפולין (1660-1655) העיר נשרפה כליל. לאחר ההרס המקום לא התאושש והמשיך להתקיים בקושי ככפר קטן שאנשיו עסקו בעיקר בחקלאות. בשנת 1772, לאחר חלוקת פולין   הראשונה בין המעצמות השכנות, משאנה דולנה סופחה לאימפריה האוסטרית ונכללה בחבל גליציה המערבית. ב-1821 נבנה דרך חדשה אל העיירות הסמוכות ראבקה ולימנובה אשר תרמה להתאוששות ההדרגתית של המקום. בכפר הוקמו מפעלי תעשייה אחדים ובשנת 1884 תחנת רכבת על מסילת הרכבת שחיברה את בין חלקיה המערבים לאלה המזרחיים של חבל גליציה. בזמן מלחמת העולם הראשונה (1918-1914) לחם באזור משאנה הלגיון הפולני בפיקודו של רידז-שמיגלי כיחידה בצבא אוסטריה. בתום מלחמת העולם הראשונה משאנה דולנה נכללה בגבולות פולין.
 

היהודים במשאנה דולנה

התיישבות היהודים במשאנה דולנה התחילה במחצית המאה ה-19, עד אז הגיעו לאזור רק יהודים בודדים. היהודים הראשונים היו חוכרי בתי מרזח אשר קיבלו אישור לכך מבני האצולה המקומיים. ב-1880 התקיימה במקום קהילה עצמאית של 217 יהודים (12,1%) וברשותה היו בית כנסת, מקווה ובית עלמין. רוב יהודי המקום התפרנסו ממסחר זעיר, מרוכלות וממלאכה. ב-1891 נתמנה לרב המקום הרב יוסף הולנדר. כהונתו נמשכה עד 1912. לאחר פטירתו ועד 1938 כיהן ברבנות בנו, הרב נתן דוד. בנו של נתן דוד, הרב אהרון אריה הולנדר היה אחרון רבני משאנה דולנה והוא נספה בשואה.

ערב מלחמת העולם הראשונה (1918-1914) הקהילה גדלה עד 535 יהודים. בנובמבר  1918, כאשר חיילי הלגיון הפולני של גנרל האלר הגיעו למשאנה דולנה וערכו פרעות ביהודי המקום. הם פרצו לבתי היהודים וביזזו אותם. בעיניהם של החיילים האלה היהודים נחשבו למשתפי פעולה עם השלטונות האוסטריים. במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 1921, נמנו במשאנה דולנה 410 יהודים שהם היוו 13,5% מתוך 3,016 כלל תושבי המקום. היחסים בין היהודים לבין האוכלוסייה הנוצרית במשאנה דולנה והסביבה בשנים שבין שתי מלחמות העולם היו מתוחים. היו שהאשימו את היהודים בתמיכה בתנועה הקומוניסטית, באחד הכפרים פרצו פרעות של ביריונים נגד יהודים ונורו יריות. הייתה גם עלילת דם נגד בעלת חנות יהודייה שהופרכה בבית משפט.

היהודים התרכזו בעיקר במרכז העיר. בין העסקים בבעלות יהודית היו המכולות של משפחות גינסבורג וזינס, חנות לממכר עורות ומוצרי סנדלרות בבעלותו של אברהם בוכסבאום. בככר העיר עמדו חנות סידקית וחנות ירקות ודגים ולידם סדנה וחנות של זגג.  ברחוב פילסודסקי היו ממוקמים מספר בתים וחנויות בבעלות יהודית, ביניהם המכולת של טרנר, האטליז של שמברגר, מספרה וכמה בתים בבעלותו של לווייסברגר. ברחוב קולברג פעלו מלון ומסעדה של משפחת לילנטאל. באולשני משפחת פויירשטיין חכרה מנסרה. בבעלותו של יצחק ווידאבסקי היה מפעל הסוכריות "שטולוורק". ברחוב אוגרודובה היה ממוקם בית החרושת לרהיטים בבעלותה של משפחת אדלר. בן אחר של משפחת אדלר היה בעל של משרד לעריכת דין.

בתקופה בין שתי מלחמות העולם התקיימה במקום פעילות פוליטית ותרבותית ערה. במקום פעלו סניפים של "הציונים הכללים", "ההתאחדות", "עקיבא". בשנת 1923 בתמיכתו של הארגון האצריקאי הג'וינט נוסד "ביקור חולים" לתמיכה בנזקקים, בשנת 1930 הוקמה במקום ספרייה עם אולם קריאה. ערב פרוץ מלחמת העולם השנייה היו במשאנה דולנה כ-800 יהודים.

 

תקופת השואה

ב-1 בספטמבר 1939 גרמניה הנאצית פלשה לפולין. ב-3 בספטמבר 1939 הגרמנים כבשו  את משאני דולנה. מיד עם כיבוש המקום הגרמנים החלו לחטוף יהודים לעבודות כפייה, ערכו חיפושים בבתי היהודים ושדדו מהם דברי ערך. ב-17 בספטמבר 1939 הצבא הסובייטי פלש לפולין וכבש את שטחי מזרח פולין עד למבואות לובלין. חלק מיהודי משאנה דולנה עבר אל שטחי הכיבוש הסובייטי, אך רובם חזרו לעיירה כעבור כמה ימים. בסתיו 1939 הגרמנים הטילו על היהודים את הגזרות הראשונות שכללו איסור לעסוק במסחר, בעיקר עם הפולנים, איסור לעזוב את המקום, וכמו כן איסור גישה לשוק וקניית מזון אצל כפריים. על היהודים הוטלה החובה לענוד על הזרוע סרט עם מגן דוד, כל היהודים בגילאים 60-12 חויבו לעבוד בעבודות כפייה. בינואר 1940 הוקם גטו לא מגודר. יותר מ-200 פליטים הגיעו מלודז' בחודשים מרץ-אפריל 1940. בסתיו 1940 הוקם במקום סניף של ה"יס.ס."- האירגון היהודי לעזרה הדדית שמרכזו בקרקוב. 267 אנשים קיבלו מהיס.ס. מזון ועוד 450 נזקקו לסעד.

לאחר הפלישה הגרמנית לברית המועצות ביוני 1941, רוכזו במשאנה דולנה היהודים מכפרי הסביבה ביניהם כ-50 איש מהכפרים סקז'ידלנה ( (Skrzydlnaופז'נושה (Przenosza). בסתיו 1941 נתמנה יודנראט ובראשו הועמד אריה שמיד. כמו כן הוקמה משטרה יהודית. בגטו היו מרוכזים כ-1,000 יהודים. מצב היהודים החמיר. היס.ס. טיפל ב-310 איש, העזרה ההדדית לא הספיקה. למרות האיסור של היציאה מהגטו שדינו גזר דין מוות, אנשים הסתכנו וחיפשו מזון בכפרי הסביבה. אלה שחיפשו מקלט מחוץ לגטו נתפסו ונרצחו במקום.

לראש המועצה המקומית נתמנה הפולקסדויטשה וולאדיסלב גלב, אדם אכזרי במיוחד. אחד "התחביבים" האהובים עליו היה לגזור ליהודים את הזקנים והפאות או לצוות עליהם להתאסף בשעה ארבע לפנות בוקר בככר העיר, לסדר אותם בשורות ולבצע תרגילי התעמלות מעייפים במשך שעות. בתום התרגילים, כשאנשים היו כבר באפיסת כוחות, הוא ציווה לשפך עליהם מים קרים.

בשנים 1942-1941 רוב היהודים עבדו במחצבות בסביבה, לאנשים אשר סבלו מתת-תזונה העבודה הייתה קשה ביותר. באפריל 1942 הגרמנים האשימו עשרים ושניים יהודים בחבלה והוציאו אותם להורג בשטח ה"אדלרובקה". עדים סיפרו שבשעת ההוצאה להורג מספר יהודים, ביניהם השוחט המקומי, התנפלו על הרוצחים. באביב או בתחילת קיץ 1942 נשלחו מספר צעירים למחנות העבודה בפוסטקוב (Pustków) ובפלשקוב (Płaszow). באותו הזמן הוטל על היהודים תשלום קנס גבוה.

ביולי 1942 הגרמנים ערכו רשימת שמית של יושבי הגטו, היהודים נצטוו להצטלם ונאמר להם שתמונותיהם ישמשו עבור מסמכי נסיעה לווהלין.באמצע אוגוסט 1942 הוטל קנס נוסף  על הקהילה שלא עלה בידי היהודים לשלמו. ב-16 באוגוסט 1942 הוצא צוו לפיו על יהודי משאנה דולנה, לימנובה, סטארי סונץ' ופיאסצ'נה לעבור לגטו בנובי סונץ'. ב-17 באוגוסט קיבלו יושבי הגטו מנות לחם וריבה לשבועיים. היהודים הצטוו להתייצב ב-19 באוגוסט 1942 בשעה חמש בבוקר עם מטען של 20 ק"ג במגרש ברובע אולשני, בשדה על יד הגיא שנקרא "פאנסקייה" (Pańskie). על פי הצוו כל היהודים יוצאו להורג במקום אם אחד מהם ייחסר. מפחד העונש כל היהודים התייצבו באולשני. מנובי סונץ' הגיעו במכוניות אנשי גסטאפו. לאחר מסירת המפתחות של הדירות ותשלום עבור "כרטיסי הנסיעה", נבחרו על ידי מפקד הגסטאפו האמאן כ-130-120 צעירים. את יתר היהודים, בקבוצות של 100 איש, הובילו אנשי הגסטאפו לבית חרושת לשימורים שבקרבת מקום. שם היו כבר מוכנים שני בורות שכרו יום קודם צעירים פולנים מאירגון "יונאקי" (Junaki) שהועסקו ב"באודינסט" – אירגון של עבודות כפייה. לפולנים נאמר שלא לספר לאף אחד על הבורות. היהודים שהובאו לקברים החפורים נצטוו להתפשט ונורו למוות מעל הבורות. נרצחו שם 881 יהודים. 80 איש מקבוצת הצעירים שנשארו בחיים הועברו למחנה עבודה בלימנובה שם עבדו בסלילת כבישים עד לחיסולו ב-5 בנובמבר 1942. באותו היום הם נורו בזאמייש'צ'יה (Zamieście) שליד טימבארק (Tymbark), כ-4 ק"מ מלימנובה. שאר האנשים מהקבוצע של הצעירים הושארו במשאנה דולנה והועסקו במחצבה. אם סיום העבודה שם הם הועברו לגטו טארנוב ומשם למחנה הריכוז בשבניה (Szebnie). מהם ניצלו מעטים בלבד. מן הרצח במשאנה דולנה ניצלו 10 יהודים שהושארו כדי לאסוף את הרכוש הנטוש של הנרצחים. כעבור ימים אחדים 9 איש מהקבוצה ברחו אך רובם נתפסו על ידי הפולנים ונרצחו. בין 14 באוקטובר 1940 ועד נובמבר 1942 פעל במשאנה דולנה מחנה עבודה של החברה "קליי, ייגר ושות'".  במחנה הזה היו כלואים כ-80 יהודים שעבדו בגריסת חצץ. בזמן האקציה במשאנה דולנה נרצחו כל הנשים שהיו במחנה הזה. בספטמבר 1942 ברחו מן המחנה 5 יהודים. בנובמבר 1942 הועברו כל 45 הגברים שנותרו עדיין במקום, אל נובי סונץ' ושם נורו למוות.

 

לאחר השואה

הצבא האדום שיחרר את משאנה דולנה ב-27 בינואר 1945. מעטים מיהודי משאנה דולנה ניצלו, אלה שברחו ונשארו בשטח הכיבוש הסובייטי חזרו לעיירה, אך נאלצו לנדוד הלאה מפאת המחתרת הפולנית האנטי קומוניסטית הרצחנית. בית הכנסת של המקום ובית הספר היהודי הסמוך אליו נהרסו על ידי הגרמנים מיד לאחר חיסול הגטו שהיה בקרבתו. היום במקומו עומד הביניין של בית הספר היסודי.  

בית העלמין נהרס בחלקו ונלקחו ממנו מצבות על ידי הגרמנים לבניים כבישים. הרס המקום המשיך גם לאחר 1945. נותרו בו כ-30 מצבות. ב-1989 בית העלמין הוכנס לרשימת המקומות לשימור. ביוזמתו של יוצא משאנה דולנה, לאו גאטטרר, השטח נוקה ושופץ, בית העלמין גודר בגדר ברזל עם שער ופשפש. היום שטחו של בית העלמין שייך לקהילה היהודית בקרקוב.

 בתום המלחמה הגיעו למשאנה דולנה כמה ניצולים והציבו בגיא ההריגה בפאנסקייה (Pańskie) אנדרטה עם כתובת בעברית בפולנית לזכר 881 היהודים שנרצחו שם. להלן הטקסט של הכתובת: "לזכר 881 היהודים הקדושים ממשאני דאלנא והסביבה הנרצחים על ידי הפושעים הנאצים ביום 19.8.1942, אשר זעקתם האחרונה היא הדממה של המקום. חולקים להם כבוד היהודים שניצלו מהפוגרום הפשיסטי. ינקום ד' נקמת דם שפוך. ת'נ'צ'ב'ה'". בתחתית האנדרטה הונחה אבן מירושלים, י'  אב תש"ס – 11.08.2000. במקום הירצחם של 22 יהודים באפריל 1942 ברחוב אוגרודובה הוקמה מצבת זכרון ביידיש.

לאחר המלחמה גופותיהם של 80 היהודים שנרצחו בזאמייש'צ'יה (Zamieście) שליד טימבארק (Tymbark) הוצאו מקבר האחים ונקברו בבית העלמין של קרקוב. ב-22 באפריל 2010 הקרן לשימור המורשת היהודית בשיתוף הקרן ""Forum Dialogu ערכו בפני תלמידי בתי הספר של משאנה דולנה סדרת הרצאות על ההיסטוריה היהודית של המקום, על השפה, המנהגים של האנשים שפעם התגוררו ביישוב שלהם. נערכו גם סיורים במקומות בעלי עבר יהודי. ב-19 באוגוסט 2019, ליד האנדרטה על קבר האחים של היהודים בגיא "פאנסקייה" נערך טקס בהשתתפות נכבדי ותלמידי בתי הספר של העיירה לציום השנה ה-77 לרצח יהודי משאנה דולנה.

Galicia

Yiddish: גאַליציע (Galitsye); Polish: Galicja ; German: Galizien; Ukranian: Галичина (Halychyna); Russian: Galitsiya; Hungarian: Gácsország; Romanian: Galiţia; Czech, Slovak: Halič

Geographically part of east Europe, in S.E. Poland and N.W. Ukraine. Galician roots derive from the name of the Ukrainian town Halicz (in Ukranian: Halych), in the Middle Ages part of the Kyivan Rus.
 

21st Century

The special life and culture of the Galician shtetl of the olden days remain with us in the history, in the shtetls of the past, and in Hassidic stories and books.

The Galicia Jewish Museum in Kazimierz established in 2004 commemorates the victims of the Holocaust and holds on to Jewish Galician culture.

 

History

Galicia had great significance in the history of the Jewish European Diaspora. The Jews of Galicia formed a bond between the Jews of East and West Europe.

The Kingdom of Galicia was first established on land given to the Habsburg Empire with the first partition of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth of 1772. Six towns amongst them Brody, Belz and Rogatin were close to entirely Jewish populated. Previous to the 1772 partition, Galicia was the Little Poland. The Galician Kingdom as such lasted until the early 20th century. The first chief rabbi (Oberlandesrabbiner) of Galicia was Aryeh Leib Bernstein with seat in Lemberg. After 1772 further lands were acquired to the Kingdom, and extended Galicia to the north and north west. The small Republic of Krakow joined the Kingdom in 1846 with the territory encompassing over an area of 20,000 square miles and this remained as such until the end of the Kingdom (1918). The 1860’s saw efforts toward democratic changes ensued by a period of an autonomous Galicia from 167-1918. Galicia was covered in the Emperor Joseph II (Josef Benedikt Anton Michel Adam), Holy Roman Emperor, statutes for the betterment of Jewish life. Amongst others, Jews were to take on German family names and governmental schools were set for the education of Jews. 

Galicia had historically during its existence under the Habsburg regime, been the land with one of the highest percentages of Jewish populations worldwide. At the time of the region's annexation to the Habsburg Empire in 1772, the Jewish population numbered 224,980 (9.6% of total), in 1857 448’971 (9.7%) and 871,895 (10.9%) in 1910. Distinguishing them from the rest of the Habsburg population was their Orthodox Judaism with distinctive mannerism, clothes and language. Their communities established commercial and trading platforms. In the towns, also smaller ones, Jews occupied retailing and craftsmanship work for household and garment ware such as textile, tailoring, hatters and furriers. Foreign trade was largely Jewish business with Russia, Turkey and Germany.

The last decades of the 18th century already saw the beginnings of the Haskalah with flourishing social and cultural Jewish life in those days and early 19th centuyr with its golden days from 1815-mid 19th century in Galicia with its center in Brody. Euducation and literature blooming in the 19th century, formed Galicia into a center for Judaism in creation and intellect while traditional Jewish learning was nevertheless not neglected in that century. Those days did see struggles between Hassidim and Mitnaggedim, Hassidim and Haskalah. Prominent figures came from the Belz dynasty, Zanz and Ruzhin. In the large cities Reform synagogues were sacred, the Lvov leadership placed a Reform Rabbi Abraham Kohn in the late 1830s who however faced severe adversity in 1848. There were Jewish schools with German as language of instruction and the 1830 and 1840s saw growth and increased influence of Maskilim. This twin striving for Haskalah and assimilation towards German culture took a change in the 60s and 70s, with the reigns shifting to more university oriented representatives alongside a trend accompanied by the strongly Orthodox to an absorption to more local Polish culture and policy. In the revolutionary parliament of 1848 sat a few Jews from Galicia. At the time some adverse policies were revoked by the government. In parallel there was an amelioration in the economic situation of Jews which also saw a heightened shift of Jews into the farming sector including the development of experimental Jewish farms.

From the late 1860s a separation occurred of the Aggudat Ahimm, the Polish assimilationists, from the German assimilationists. The former adherents of Orthodoxy brought together a rabbinical conference in Lvov which ruled that community voting was dependent upon adherence of members to the Shulhan Arukh. In that century there were several weekly and monthly periodicals published in Galicia in Hebrew and Yiddish. There occurred also from the 1860-1880s an anti-assimilationist tendency and new directions in Haskalah. This was greatly influenced by Peretz Smolenskin a Zionist and Hebrew writer. He was concerned with the Halaskah movement, an early and strong proponent of Jewish nation-state building and rejectionist of Judaism’s westernization. A first society for Palestine settlement was established in 1875 in Przemysl, south-east Poland and in the 1880s the Hovevei Zion gained ground. This was accompanied by increasing antisemitism on Polish territory with the assimilationist Aguddat Ahim halting publication in 1884 of written materials and going insofar as declaring the only Jewish future as emigration of Palestine or conversion to Christianity. Early Zionist organizations were established and publications were issued in the region of Lvov. In the early 1890s economic boycotts were imposed on Jews from exclusion on trade in agricultural goods and merchandize, alcohol and more. The Jewish population in Galicia faced poverty. Nevertheless, Zionist movements continued their efforts.

Alongside, the early 20th century saw the development of neo-romantic Yiddish literature mostly coming from the area of Lvov and influenced by a corresponding phenomenon in Vienna. One prominent writer was Shmuel Yosef Agnon (1888-1970) who would come to monument the Galician shtetls. Those days also saw the translation into the Yiddish of foreign literature. Such representatives were the Oscar Wilde, of which one of his most famous works are the humorous ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’. World War I saw many Galician Jews flee to Hungary, Bohemia and Vienna, and in particular educated Galician Jews find refuge in Vienna. Those remaining suffered greatly under the Russians entry into Galicia. Ensuing in 1918 with the Polish-Ukranian war the unfortunate situation of minorities on Polish land increasingly led to the crumbling of the once Jewish-inspired Kingdom of Galicia. The Polish Republic took over the Galician land. Notwithstanding, deference to German and Polish culture and to the Polish nation, Hassidism and Zionist striving continued to sprout in the years until 1939, inklings of the Galician world remained with Hassidic communities as in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and New York. 

Galicia had historically during its existence under the Habsburg regime, been the land with one of the highest percentages of Jewish populations worldwide. Distinguishing them from the rest of the population were their Orthodox Judaism with distinctive mannerism, clothes and language. Their communities established commercial and trading platforms. With the mid-19th century nevertheless this population saw beginnings of wearing out. Those were the days of the onset of the Haskalah (Jewish enlightenment) with family life adhering to Orthodox Judaism while modernizing outwardly and seeing an improved standing in society and economy and reduced isolation. The trend was of assimilation of Galician Jews to Germans and then to Poles. This trend of the last decades of the 19th century amongst Galician Jews went in parallel to the Marxist striving for a workers’ revolution.

Poland

Rzeczpospolita Polska -  Republic of Poland 

A country in central Europe, member of the European Union (EU).

21st Century

Estimated Jewish population in 2018: 4,500 out of 38,500,000 (0.01%). Main umbrella organization of the Jewish communities:

Union of Jewish Religious Communities in Poland - Związek Gmin Wyznaniowych Żydowskich w Polsce (ZGWŻP)
Phone: 48 22 620 43 24
Fax: 48 22 652 28 05
Email: sekretariat@jewish.org.pl
Website: http://jewish.org.pl/

 

HISTORY

The Jews of Poland

1096 | Migration of the Heretics

Where did the Jews come to Poland from? Scholars are divided on this question, but many believe that some came from the Khazar Kingdom, from Byzantium and from Kievan Rus, while most immigrated from Western Europe – from the Lands of Ashkenaz.
One of the theories is that the “butterfly effect” that led the Jews of Ashkenaz to migrate to Poland began with a speech by Pope Urban II, who in 1096 called for the liberation of the holy sites in Jerusalem from the Muslim rule. The Pope's call ignited what would come to be known as The Crusades - vast campaigns of conquest by the Christian faithful, noble and peasant alike, who moved like a tsunami from Western Europe to the Middle East, trampling, stealing and robbing anything they could find along the way.
Out of a fervent belief that “heretics” were “heretics”, be they Jews or Muslims, the militant pilgrims made sure not to bypass the large Jewish communities in the Ashkenaz countries, where they murdered many of the local Jews, mostly in the communities of Worms and Mainz on the banks of the Rhine. Following these massacres, known in Jewish historiography as the Massacres of Ttn”u (after the acronym of the year of Hebrew calendar), Jews started migrating east, into the Kingdom of Poland.

1264 | The Righteous Among The Nations from Kalisz.

In the 13th century Poland was divided into many districts and counties, and to rule them all an advanced bureaucratic system was required. In 1264 the Polish prince Boleslav, also known as the Righteous One of Kalisz (Kalisz was a large city in the Kingdom of Poland) issued a bill of rights that granted the Jews extensive freedom of occupation as well as freedom of religious practice. This bill of rights (privilegium, in Latin) allowed many Jews – literate merchants, experts in economy, bankers, coin makers and more – to fill various roles in the administrative apparatus of the kingdom.
At that time, the Catholic Church in Poland was in the habit of disseminating all sorts of blood libels against the Jews. Article 31 of the Prince Boleslav of Kalisz's privilegium tried to rein in this phenomenon by stating: “Accusing Jews of drinking Christian blood is expressly prohibited. If despite this a Jew should be accused of murdering a Christian child, such charge must be sustained by testimony of three Christians and three Jews.”

1370 | From Esther to Esther

It turns out that Esther from the Scroll of Esther was not the only Esther who saved the Jewish people. Legend tells of a beautiful Jewish woman from Poland named Esther'ke who was a mistress of King Casimir II the Great of Poland (1310-1370) and even bore him two daughters.
It is unclear whether it was love that aroused Casimir's sympathy for the Chosen People. What is known is that according to legend, like the Queen Esther from the Purim story, Esther'ke also looked out for her people and asked the King to establish a special quarter for Jews in Krakow (and this quarter is no legend). The King acquiesced to his lover's request and named the quarter for himself – the Kazimierz Quarter. In addition, and this is no legend either, messengers were sent to all Jewish communities in Poland and beyond inviting the Jews to relocate to Krakow, then the capital of the kingdom.
The invitation to come to Poland was like a much-needed breath of air for the Jews of Ashkenaz, for those were the days in which the Black Death ravaged Europe, which for some reason was claimed to have “skipped” the Jews. For the audacity of not contracting the plague, the Jews faced baseless accusations of having poisoned the drinking wells in order to spread the plague.

1520 | A State Within a State

In the early 16th century the center of gravity of Jewish life gradually moved from the countries of Central Europe to locations all over Poland. According to various historical sources, in the late 15th century there were around 15 yeshivas operating throughout Poland. The study of Torah flourished in the large communities and became the central axis of Ashkenazi religious life. It is no surprise, therefore, that the common name for Poland among the Jews who lived there was “Po-lan-Ja” - or in Hebrew: "God resides here".
The status of the Jews in Poland had no equal at the time anywhere in the world. Almost everywhere else in Europe they were persecuted, expelled and subject to various restrictions, whereas in Poland they were granted a special, privileged status.
In the early 16th century there were some 50,000 Jews living in Poland. During these years an interest-based alliance began to form between the Jews and the Polish nobility. The nobles, wishing to avail themselves of the Jews' connections and skills in business management, appointed Jews to various positions in the management of their feudal estates and gave them bills of rights according them special status.
In 1520 the “Council of Four Lands” was established in Poland. This council, which was a sort of “state within the state”, was composed of the representatives of all the Jewish communities of Poland, from Krakow and Lublin to Vilnius and Lithuania (which were then still part of the Polish “Commonwealth”). The main function of the Council was to collect taxes for the authorities, and it enjoyed judicial autonomy based on Jewish halacha. The Council operated for 244 years, and is considered the longest-lasting Jewish leadership in history, at least since the First Temple Era.

1569 | Demon-graphics

In the year 1618 the authorities of Krakow appointed a commission to find the reasons for hostility between Jewish and Christian merchants. The chairman of the commission, an academic by the name of Sebastian Miczynski, found that the reason for the animosity was the rapid increase in the number of Jews in the city, stemming from the fact that “none of them die at war or from plague, and in addition they marry at age 12 and multiply furiously”.
Miczynski's conclusion was not without basis: The growth rate of the Jewish community in Poland, known in research as “The Polish Jewish demographic miracle”, was indeed astounding. By the mid 17th century the number of Jews in Poland reached several hundred thousand – about half of all Jews in the world. By the mid 18th century their numbers reached approximately one million souls.
However, although Miczynski's diagnosis was correct, the reasons he offered for it, which were heavily tainted by anti-Semitism, were unsurprisingly wrong. Various researchers have found that the reason for the relatively rapid growth of Jews in Poland was a low rate of infant mortality among them compared to the Christian population. Among the reasons for this one can offer are the culture of mutual aid prevalent among Jews, the fact that newlywed couples usually lived with the bride's family, which offered better nutrition, and the fact that Jewish religious laws enjoin better hygiene practices than were the norm in the rest of pre-modern Europe.
In 1569 Poland annexed large parts of Ukraine under the Treaty of Lublin. Many Jews chose to migrate to Ukraine, and found a new source of livelihood there – leasing land. This they once again did in conjunction with the Polish nobility. Many of the Ukrainian peasants resented the new immigrants. Not only did the feudal lords tax them heavily, they thought, now they also “enslave us to the enemies of Christ, the Jews.”
During this time some brilliant intellectuals emerged in the Jewish areas of Poland, including Rabbi Moses Isserles (aka “The Rema” after his acronym), Rabbi Shlomo Lurie and Rabbi Joel Sirkis, and the great yeshivas of Lublin and Krakow were founded. The rabbinical elite was also the political elite among the Jewish community, setting the rules of life down to the smallest detail – from the number of jewels a woman may wear to requiring approval by community administrators in order to wed.

1648 | Bohdan The Brute

Had there been a senior class photo of all the worst oppressors the Jewish people have known, Bohdan (also known as Bogdan) Khmelnytsky would probably be standing front and center in it. Khmelnytsky, the leader of the Ukrainian Cossacks who fought for independence against Poland, was responsible for particularly lethal pogroms against the Jews of Ukraine. These pogroms were fueled by a combination of Christian revival and popular protest against Polish subjugation. The Jews, who were seen as the Polish nobility's “agents of oppression” paid a terrible price: Approximately 100,000 of them were murdered in these pogroms.
The Khmelnytsky Massacres, also known in Jewish historiography as “The Ta”ch and Ta”t Pogroms”, left the Jewish community of Poland shocked and bereaved. The community's poets composed dirges and the rabbis decreed mourning rituals. A chilling account of these events can be found in the book “Yeven Mezulah” by Jewish scholar Nathan Hannover, who fled the pogroms himself and described them in chronological order. In time many works were written based on this account. The most famous are “The Slave” by Isaac Bashevis Singer, and the poem “The Rabbi's Daughter” by the great Hebrew poet and translator Shaul Tchernichovski.
Despite the grief and sorrow, the Jewish community of Ukraine soon recovered. Proof of this can be found in the accounts of English traveler William Cox, who wrote 20 years after the massacres: “Ask for an interpreter and they bring you a Jew; Come to an inn, the owner is a Jew; If you require horses to travel, a Jew supplies and drives them; and if you wish to buy anything, a Jew is your broker.”

1700 | A Very Good Name

The year 1700 saw the birth of the man who would reshape Orthodox Judaism and become the founder of one of the most important movements in all its long history: Rabbi Israel Ben Eliezer, far better known as the Baal Shem Tov, or The Besh”t for short.
The Baal Shem Tov began his career as a healer with herbs, talismans and sacred names, thus becoming known as a “Baal Shem” - a designation for someone who knows the arcana of the divine names, which he can use to mystical effect.
Rumor of the righteous man who performs miracles and speaks of a different Judaism – less academic and scholarly, more emotional and experiential – soon spread far and wide. Religious discourse soon included terms such as “dvekut”, which means “devotion”, and “pnimiut”, meaning “inner being”. Thus was the Hasidic movement born, emphasizing moral correctness and the desire for religious devotion, placing a high premium on the discipline of Kabbalah. The immense success of Hasidism stemmed from its being a popular movement which allowed entry to any Jew, even if he wasn't much for book smarts.
The Besh”t also set the template for the form of the Hasidic circle: A group of people coalescing around the personality of a charismatic leader who provides each member with personal guidance. Among the most famous Hasidic movement today one can count Chabad/Liubavitch, Ger and Breslov, which was founded by Rabbi Nachman of Breslov (the great-grandson of the Besh”t), and is unique in having no single leader or “Rebbe” or Admor, a Hebrew acronym which stands for “Our Master, Teacher and Rabbi”, the title of other Hasidic leaders, as none is considered worthy to carry the mantle of the founder.
Those were also the years in which Kabbalist literature began to spread in Poland, along with various mystical influences, including the Sabbatean movement. One of the innovation of the Kabbalist literature was the way in which the issue of observing commandments was perceived: In establishment rabbinical thought, the commandments were seen as a device for maintaining community structures and the religious lifestyle. The Hasidim, on the other hand, claimed that the commandments were a mystical device through which even a common man may effect changes in the heavenly spheres. In modern terms one may say that the meaning of observing the commandments was “privatized”, ceasing to be the property of the rabbinical elite and becoming the personal business of every common observant Jew.

1767 | What Came First – Wheat or Vodka?

To paraphrase the eternal questions of “what came first – the chicken or the egg?” 18th century Poles asked “What came first – wheat or vodka?” What they meant is, was it the great profitability of grain-based liquor that created mass alcohol addiction, or was it the addiction to alcohol that created the demand for wheat? Either way, the idea of turning wheat into vodka had a magical draw for Jews in the steppes of Poland. In the second half of the 18th century vodka sales accounted for approximately 40% of all income in Poland. The Jews, who recognized the immense financial potential of this trade, took over the business of leasing liquor distilleries and taverns from the nobles. In fact, historians have determined that some 30% of all Jews in the Commonwealth of Poland-Lithuania had some connection to the liquor business.
But liquor was far from the only field of commerce the Jews of Poland engaged in. They traded all manner of goods. In a sample of data from the years 1764-1767, collected from 23 customs houses, it was found that out of 11,485 merchants, 5,888 were Jews, and that 50%-60% of all retail commerce was held by Jewish merchants.
The reciprocal relations between the Jews and the Magnates, the Polish nobility, became ever tighter. Save for rare phenomena, such as the habit of some nobles to force Jews to dance before them in order to humiliate them, these relations were stable and dignified. Historians note that the Jewish leaser “was not a parasite cringing in fear, but a man aware of his rights, as well as his obligations”.

1795 | The Empires Swallow Poland

Until the partition of Poland, Poland's Jews could live in cities such as Krakow or Lublin, for example, with almost no direct contact with the outside political and legal authorities. Most of them resided in towns or hamlets (“Shtetl”, in Yiddish) where they lived in a closed cultural and social bubble. They spoke their own language, Yiddish, and their children were taught in separate institutions – the cheder for young children and then the Talmud-Torah. The legal system and political leadership were also internal: The tribunals and the Kahal, which operated on the basis of halacha, were the sole court of appeals for the settling of disputes and disagreements.
The only connection most Jews had with the outside world was in their work, which usually involved leasing of some sort from the nobles. Proof of this can be found in the words of Jewish storyteller Yechezkel Kutik, who wrote that “In those days, what was bad for the paritz (the Polish feudal lord) was at least partly bad for the Jews. Almost everyone made their living from the paritz”.
In 1795 Poland was partitioned between three empires – Russia, Austria and Prussia, the nucleus of modern Germany. This brought an end to the shared history of Poland's Jews, and began three distinctly different stories: That of the Jews of the Russian-Czarist Empire, that of the Jews of Galicia under Austrian rule, and that of the Jews of Prussia, who later became the Jews of Germany.
The situation for Jews in Austria and Prussia was relatively good, definitely when compared to that of Jews living under Czarist rule, which imposed various financial edicts upon them and allowed them freedom of movement only within the Pale of Settlement, where conditions were harsh. The nadir was the outbreak of pogroms in the years 1881-1884, which led to the migration of some 2 million Jews to the United States – the place that would come to replace Poland as the world's largest host of Jews. Upon the partition of Poland, most Jews living in that country found themselves under Russian rule. Please see the entry “The Jews of Russia” for further information regarding them.

1819 | The Jews of Galicia

The image of the “Galician Jew” was and still is a code not only for a geographic identity, but mostly for a unique Jewish identity which combined a multicultural-ethnicity with a cunning, humorous, warm and sympathetic folklore figure. The “Galician Jew” could be a devout Hasid, an enlightened educated person, a Polish nationalist or a Zionist activist, a great merchant or a vendor trudging from door to door. This Jew was weaned on several different cultures and could gab in several tongues – German, Yiddish, Hebrew, Russian and Polish.
Galicia extended over the south of Poland. Its eastern border was Ukraine, but the Austrian empire ruled over it from 1772 to the end of WW1. In the second half of the 19th century Austrian Emperor Franz Joseph granted the Jews fully equal rights. The city of Lvov became a magnet for educated Jews from all over Europe. Yiddish newspapers, including the “Zeitung”, operated there at full steam, commerce flourished and Zionist movements, among them Poalei Zion, played a central role in reviving Jewish nationality.
At the same time the Hasidic movement also flourished in Galicia, branching out from several Hasidic courts and dynasties of “Tzadiks”. Among the best known of these Hasidic sects were those of Belz and Sanz, which preserved the traditional Hasidic lifestyle, including dress and language, and maintained tight relations with the “Tzadik” who headed the court.
Galicia was also the soil from which the writers of the age of Haskala (the Jewish Enlightenment movement) grew – from Joseph Perl, the pioneer of Hebrew literature, who in 1819 wrote “Megale Tmirin” (“Revealer of Mysteries”), the first Hebrew novel, and ending with Yosef Haim Brenner and Gershon Shofman, who lived in Lvov and skillfully described Jewish life there in the early 20th century.
The multicultural, equal-rights idyll ended for the Jews of Galicia against the backdrop of cannon shells and flames of WW1. The region of Galicia passed from hand to hand between the Austrian and Russian armies, and the soldiers of both massacred the Jews again and again. This is what S. (Shloyme) Ansky, author of “The Dybbuk” and the writer who commemorated the fate of Galician Jews during the war, wrote on the subject: “In Galicia an atrocity beyond human comprehension has been committed. A large region of a million Jews, who but yesterday enjoyed all human and civil rights, is surrounded by a fiery chain of iron and blood, cut off and set apart from the world, given to the rule of wild beasts in the form of Cossacks and soldiers. The impression is as though an entire tribe of Israel is becoming extinct.”

1862 | The Siren Call of HaTsefira

While the Haskala, the Jewish Enlightenment movement, was born in Western Europe, its echoes soon reached the eastern part of the continent as well, and Poland in particular. One of the seminal events illustrating the roots put down by the Haskala movement in Poland was the founding of the periodical “HaTsefira” in Warsaw. “HaTsefira” became one of the most highly-regarded Hebrew newspapers and sought to take a real part in the process of secularizing the Hebrew language and turning it from a liturgical tongue to a living, everyday medium.
The newspaper gained steam in the late 1870s, when the editorial board was joined by Nachum Sokolov, journalist, author and Zionist-national thinker, who in his latter years served as President of the World Zionist Organization. Sokolov gradually reduced the emphasis of “HaTsefira” on popular science, giving it a serious journalistic and literary character instead. Under his leadership the periodical became a daily in 1886, and soon stood out as the most influential Hebrew newspaper in Eastern Europe, until it died out in the decades between the World Wars.
All of the most prominent Hebrew writers of those days published their works in HaTsefira: Mendele Mocher Sforim, Y.L.Peretz and Shalom Aleichem in the 19th century, Dvorah Baron, Uri Nissan Genessin, Shalom Ash and Yaacov Fichman in the early 20th century, and just before WW1 it was home to the works of a few promising youngsters, including Nobel-winning authour Shmuel Yosef Agnon and acclaimed nationalist poet Uri Zvi Greenberg.

1900 | Warsaw

In the first decade of the 20th century Warsaw became the capital of the Jews of Poland and a global Jewish center. The city was home to the headquarters of the political parties, many welfare institutions, trade unions, and Jewish newspapers and periodicals published in a variety of languages. Prominent in particular was juggernaut of literary and publishing activity in this city from the 1880s to the eve of WW1.
Among the most famous literary institutions of the period were the Ben Avigdor Press, which ignited the realist “New Movement” in Hebrew literature; Achiassaf Press, founded by the tea magnate Wissotzky, which operated in the spirit of Achad Haam and published books of a Jewish-historical nature; the HaShiloach newspaper, which was copied from Odessa and was edited for a year by Chaim Nachman Bialik (later anointed national poet of the State of Israel), the newspapers “HaTsofeh” and “HaBoker” and more.
All these and many others were produced at hundreds of Hebrew printing presses which popped up like mushrooms after a rain. This industry attracted Jewish intellectuals who found work writing, editing, translating and doing other jobs required by publishing and the press. In his essay “New Hebrew Culture In Warsaw” Prof. Dan Miron wrote that: “All the Hebrew writers of the time passed through Warsaw, some staying for years and others for a short time”.
Also famous were the “literary tribunals”, especially that of author Y.L. Peretz, who held a sort of salon or court at his home which was frequented by eager literary cubs. These would submit their callow works to the revered giant of letters and tremblingly await his verdict. The Peretz court was far from the only one, though. Jewish writers and intellectuals arrived from all over Russia to “literary houses”, “salons” and other establishments, convened mostly on Sabbaths and holidays to discuss matters of great import. One of the most famous of these was the home of pedagogue Yitzchak Alterman, whose lively Hanukkah and Purim parties drew many intellectuals. These, we assume, served as inspiration for little Nanuchka, the host's son, later to become famous as poet Nathan Alterman.

Jewish Demographics In Warsaw

Year | Number of Jews
1764 1,365
1800 9,724
1900 219,128
1940 393,500
1945 7,800


1918 | The First Jewish Party in Poland

Upon the end of WW1 the Jews of Poland also fell victim to the game of monopoly played by Poland against its neighbors, particularly Soviet Russia. The Poles accused the Jews of Bolshevism, the Soviets saw them as capitalists and bourgeoisie, and these accusations turned into dozens of pogroms and tens of thousands of Jewish murder victims.
In 1921, after 125 years under various occupiers, Poland once again became a sovereign and independent state. At first the future seemed bright. The new Polish constitution guaranteed the Jews full equality and promised religious tolerance. However, like many of the supposedly democratic states formed between the two world wars, the regime in Poland also swayed between the values of Enlightenment and equality and an ethnic-based nationalism.
This was the unstable reality under which the Jews of Poland lived for 18 years, until the start of WW2. During these years the Jews experienced some bad times, during which for example they were banned from public office, and were discriminated against in matters of taxation and higher education admissions, where quotas were set limiting the number of Jews at the universities. At other times, mostly under the reign of Jozef Pilsudski (1926-1935), who was known for his relative opposition to anti-Semitism, the edicts issued against the Jews were eased.
During the Pilsudski era the Jewish parties combined to form a joint list for the legislative elections, winning 6 seats in the Sejm (lower house of the Polish parliament) and 1 in the senate, which made them the sixth-largest party. This was a mere 11 years before the outbreak of WW2 and the Holocaust of Polish Jewry.
One of the most influential figures among Jewish political leadership in Poland was Yitzhak Gruenbaum (Izaak Grünbaum), leader of the General Zionists Party, who foresaw the rise of dictatorial elements in the Sejm and made aliyah in 1933. He was right. From 1935 until the German invasion Poland was ruled by an openly dictatorial, anti-Semitic regime. During these four years some 500 anti-Semitic incidents took place, the system of “ghetto benches” was put in place, separating Jewish and Polish students at universities, and the employment options of Polish Jews were limited to such a degree that the Jewish community of Poland, numbering over three million people at the time, was considered the poorest diaspora in Europe.

1939 | The Holocaust of the Jews of Poland

September 1st, 1939, the day the Nazis invaded Poland, was etched into the collective Jewish memory in infamy. Of 3.3 million Jews who lived in Poland on the eve of the Nazi invasion, only around 350,000 survived. Some 3 million Polish Jews were exterminated in the Holocaust.
The annihilation of the Jews of Poland took place step by step. It began with various decrees, such as the gathering of Jews in ghettos, the obligation to wear an identifying mark, the imposition of a curfew in the evenings, the marking of Jewish-owned stores and more – and ended with the execution of the “Final Solution”, a satanic plan of genocide, which culminated in the deportation of the Jews of Poland to the extermination camps of Auschwitz, Majdanek, Sobibor, Chelmno and Treblinka – all located on Polish soil.
One of the best known expressions of resistance by the Jews of Poland to the Nazi plan of annihilation was the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. The revolt symbolized a triumph of spirit for the Jews of the ghetto, who embarked on it although they knew that their chances of winning or even surviving were nil.
Alongside the armed resistance by the Jews of the ghetto there was also cultural resistance. In October 1939 Emanuel Ringelblum – a historian, politician and social worker – started the “Oneg Shabbat” (“Sabbath Delight”) project in the ghetto, in which he was joined by dozens of intellectuals including authors, teachers and historians. This collective produced many works of writing on various facets of life in the ghetto, and thus became an archive and think tank dealing with current events while documenting them for future historians' reference.
In August 1942, in the midst of the deportation of the Jews of Warsaw, the archive was divided in three and each part buried for safe-keeping. Two of the three parts, secreted in metal crates and two milk jugs, were found after the war. These two parts, located in 1946 and 1950, serve to this day as imported first-hand sources on Jewish life in the ghetto, and also as testament to the courage and spiritual strength of the intellectuals whose only weapons were the pen and the camera.

2005 | Jewish Renaissance in Poland?

At the end of WW2 there were some 240,000 Jews living in Polish territories, 40,000 of them who survived the camps and another 200,000 refugees, returning from the Soviet Union territories. The displaced Jews lived in poverty and cramped conditions, and were treated with hostility by the general population despite their attempts to integrate into Polish society. In July 1946, just a year after the war ended, this hostility erupted in a pogrom in the city of Kielce. The pretext for the murder of 42 out of 163 Holocaust survivors in the city, and the wounding of most of the rest? The ancient blood libel about matza and Christian children.
This is where the Zionist movement swung into action, managing to smuggle about 100,000 of the remaining Jews in Poland to Israel under the “Bricha”, or “Escape” movement.
After WW2 Poland became a Communist country, which it remained until 1989. 1956 saw the start of the “Gomulka Aliyah” (named after Wladislaw Gomulka, Secretary General of the Polish Communist party), which lasted for a few years and brought some 35,000 more Jews to Israel from Poland. In 1967 Poland cut off relations with Israel and in 1968, amidst an anti-Semitic incitement campaign, another few thousand Jews made aliyah. This practically brought an end to the Jewish community of Poland.
At the start of the new millennium, Poland was considered the greatest mass grave of the Jewish people. The numbers speak for themselves: Before WW2 there were around 1,000 active Jewish communities in Poland, but in the year 2000 only 13 remained. Before the war Warsaw was home to almost 400,000 Jews. In 2000 only 1,000 Jews remained.
And then, at the start of the new century, a so-called “Jewish Renaissance” took place in Poland, and is still going on today. In 2005 a museum was opened across the street from the Warsaw Ghetto, where 1,000 years of Jewish history in Poland are on display. Once a year a Jewish festival is held in Krakow, exposing thousands of curious visitors from all over the world to Jewish songs and dance, kleizmer music and Yiddishke food. The Jewish theater is thriving (although it includes but one Jewish actor), and around the country “dozens of “Judaica Days” and symposiums on Jewish topics are held annually.

* All quotes in this article, unless otherwise stated, are from “From a People to a Nation: The Jews of Eastern Europe, 1772-1881”, Broadcast University Press, 2002

Rabka

Since 1999: Rabka-Zdrój

In Yiddish: ראבקע / Rabke

A town in the district of Nowy Targ, in the Lesser Poland Voivodeship in Poland. Rabka was known as a spa town.

In 1254, the Polish Prince Bolesław Wstydliwy the Shy, awarded the land of Rabka to a monastery of the Cistercians monks. In 1364, the village transitioned to ownership of the crown. The Polish King Casimir III the Great awarded to Rabka city rights according to the Magdeburg Laws. In 1446, the city passed into the ownership by the local nobility. In 1570, they began to produce salt from the local springs.

After the first partition of Poland between the neighboring powers in 1772, Rabka was annexed by the Austrian Empire. In 1813, with the goal of preserving for themselves the salt production monopoly, the Austrians prohibited salt production in the area of Rabka, and even ordered the closure of the springs producing the salt. In 1847, a cholera plague broke out in the town, which claimed 266 victims, 30% of the local inhabitants. In 1858, it was discovered that the local salt spring water contained a high percentage of iodine and bromine, and based on that, the son of the nobleman Julian Zubrzycki built a clinic which attracted many vacationers. The construction in 1884 of a train station on the rail line that crossed Western Galicia contributed to the development of the place. At the end of World War I in 1918, Rabka was included within the borders of the independent Poland.

The Jews in Rabka

Until the annexation of Rabka by the Austrian Empire, Jews were prohibited from settling there. The prohibition was removed, and the presence of six Jews was documented in 1827. Anna Magdalena Goldberger, the daughter of Joachim Goldberger, one of the Jews, converted to Christianity. After her, Leah Firer, who was born in Chocholow in 1835, also converted to Christianity. Chaya, the daughter of Moshe Bloch, also converted to Christianity, and in 1861 Pesya, the daughter of Leybl Rigelhaupt, together with her first-born brother, the merchant Herman Rigelhaupt, and his wife Anna, the daughter of Moshe Bloch, and their seven children, converted to Christianity. In the 1840s, a tavern called Aulshitze was operating in Rabka, under the ownership of the merchant Moshe Bloch (who converted to Christianity). He was also owner of a workshop for dying and drying industrial cloth. The tavern closed in 1848.

In 1835, there were 34 Jews recorded in Rabka (0,5%), in 1845 there were 67 Jews (0,8%), and in 1855, 86 Jews lived there (1,6%). The Jewish community consolidated in Rabka in the second half of the 19th century, and in 1895 there were already 261 people (3,1%). The medical clinic of Rabka earned growing popularity among Jews of Poland. As a result, the demand for kosher catering services increased, which created new opportunities for earning a living in the community. Most Jews in Rabka did not observe traditionally Jewish ways of life. They didn't wear head coverings and did not dress differently from the Christian residents.

In Rabka, a number of guest houses were built for Jewish vacationers. Despite the fact that the guest houses were under Jewish ownership and that Rabka had hired a Jewish shochet named Tibinger, they had difficulty supplying kosher food. At the end of the 19th century, a synagogue was built, and a cemetery opened. In 1890, the Jewish fund named after Wilhelm and Maria Fränkel organized a summer camp for Jewish children from Krakow and the region called Łęgi. In 1907, a building was constructed for a project to provide convalescence for children. In 1923, there were 110 children staying in the building, and in 1927 there were 400 children being treated there.

After the conclusion of World War I, the number of Jews in the town decreased. In the population census of 1921, there were 172 Jews counted in Rabka. According to the population census of 1931, in the county of Nowy Targ, 2,571 Jews resided, 450 of them living in Rabka.

The local Jews were employed in small business, manual labor, managing liquor shops and  taverns, textile shops, bakers, and peddlers. The Jews were not involved in agriculture, although they leased land and owned agricultural farms. The richest Jew in Rabka during those years was Freundlich, the owner of a beer brewery that later turned into a milk plant.

The community of Rabka was an autonomous community within the Jordanow community. Beginning in the year 1887, Rabbi Israel Ber Naftali Hertz Schreiber was appointed as the rabbi of the entire community. In the 1930's, Rabka had its own rabbi, Rabbi Israel Rokach (who died in the Holocaust). The Community Council in Rabka financed the synagogue, and in 1934 the new mikveh and the funds for the poor, supporting a gemilut hasadim fund and other welfare for the poor, and contributed to meeting educational needs, including evening lessons for learning Hebrew.

In the period between the two World Wars, there were local political, cultural and public activities among the Jews, and also among the convalescents and vacationers. There were charity organizations active locally, such as the Bikur Cholim association. The American Joint organization financed the local Jewish doctor, who took care of children and poor convalescents without charging for the services. A union of Jewish merchants and an association of craftsmen established a charity fund in 1935 to provide loans for those in need.

There was an active Jewish school. The library of the Zionist Organization served the vacationers as well. There were branches of the Zionist organizations in the area - General Zionists, Bnei Akiva, Maccabi, and Betar.
 

The Holocaust

On September 1, 1939, Nazi Germany invaded Poland. The German Army, along with the Slovakian Army, captured Rabka on September 3, 1939. The Jews were commanded to immediately present themselves for forced labor. Restrictions were placed on their movement. They had to pay high ransoms, and were required to wear an armband with a Magen David.

Also, houses and factories under Jewish ownership were marked with a Magen David. The Germans and Christian thugs would often burst into Jewish apartments and plunder their possessions. A short while later, the Germans grabbed 13 Jews and took them to an unknown location.

On September 17, 1939, the Soviet Union invaded Poland and captured areas in the east. A portion of the 450 Jews that were in Rabka until the time of the German occupation moved to the Soviet controlled area in the east. At the end of 1939, a Judenrat was set up in Rabka headed by Freundlich, the owner of the beer brewery.

Among the 12 members were Sigmund Buksbaum, the Braunfeld brothers, Israel Zelinger and Zolman. A list of Jewish residents was prepared, according to gender, age, and profession. It fell upon the Judenrat to supply men for forced labor such as removing ruins, clearing snow from roads, and working in the sawmill. Forced labor applied to all Jews aged 14 to 60. The use of the Hebrew language was prohibited, and Jewish students were removed from the Polish schools.

Jews came to Rabka from other locations with the hope that the control and supervision over the Jews would be more tolerable. The number of Jews there grew until the end of March, 1941 to 1,500, of which 880 came from Krakow and the surroundings.

In 1940, a school for officers of the German security forces in the General Governate, Schule der Sicherheitspolizei und SD in GG, was moved from Zakopane to Rabka. The school was housed in a building called Villa Tereska, which was located on a hill on Sloneczna Street. The commander of the school was SS-Untersturmführer Wilhelm Rosenbaum, known as the “hangman from Rabka”. The German and Ukrainian cadets used the Jews as tools for learning terror, cruelty, oppression and murder. In 1941, in the forest next to Villa Tereska, bunkers were built, as well as a shooting range for training. The path to the range was paved with matzevot from the nearby cemetery as well as from the Jewish cemetery in Jordanow. The beautiful steps leading up to Villa Tereska were built from matzevot from the cemeteries in Jordanow and Mszana Dolna.

In 1941, the Germans concentrated the Jews in one area on Dluga Street, in an unfenced ghetto. Later, in three other buildings on Słona Street, a work camp was set up. About one hundred Jews resided there, brought from Nowy Sanz and Nowy Targ and the surroundings. They performed quarry work, the building of roads, and the expansion of the Villa Tereska. In February, 1942, the Jews were commanded to hand over all furs, warm clothing and ski equipment. Four men who did not comply  were executed. On April 28, 1942, seven Jews were killed in the streets. Between May and July of 1942, three transports brought Jews from Nowy Sanz for forced labor, at the request of Wilhelm Rosenbaum. On May 9 1942, the first transport arrived, which included between 60 and 200 people. The people who were not capable of working or who were not favored by Wilhelm Rosenbaum were shot on May 10 in the forest next to Villa Tereska.

The second transport included about 150 people. At the end of July, 100 Jews were sent from Nowy Sancz to Rabka. Among them were Orthodox Jews in traditional clothing. Only 90 people reached Villa Tereska, the rest were shot on the way. On May 22, 1942, Wilhelm Rosenbaum arranged a selection among the Jews of Rabka. He called from a list entire families. The people were held in a barn with no food or drink. On May 25, 1942, at four in the morning, 45 people from the list, the oldest and weakest among them, were taken to Villa Tereska. At 8 in the evening, the victims were brought to pits dug in the forest behind Villa Tereska. The Ukrainians and the guards ran them to the place of sacrifice, separate groups, each being struck along the way. The people were commanded to undress and stand next to the pits, and they were shot in the back of the head . Wilhelm Rosenbaum himself murdered six Jews. The sin of one of the murdered families from Rabka - two parents, a daughter aged 15 and a son aged 10 - was their family name, Rosenbaum. They were murdered so that friends wouldn't laugh at Wilhelm Rosenbaum for having a Jewish name.

In June, 1942, at the same time of an arrival of a transport of Jews from Nowy Sanz, the mass murder took place of another group, made up of 300 Jews, among them more than 200 Jews from Rabka and about 50 Jews from Nowy Sanz. On July 17, 1942, in another slaughter, about 100 Jews were murdered who came on a transport from Nowy Sanz, along with Jews from Krakow who were seeking refuge in Rabka.

Between August 28 and 30, 1942, Jews from Rabka were sent to the extermination camp at Belzec. About 200 Jews remained in the work camp. In December, 1942, about 100 of them were moved to the concentration camp in Plaszow. On September 1, 1943, the work camp was closed, some of the Jews were executed, and the last 70 or so were sent to Plaszow.
 

After the Holocaust

Rabka was freed by the Soviet Army on January 28, 1945. The few that were saved did not return to Rabka. In 1999, Rabka received the name Rabka-Zdroj. The synagogue building that the Germans had turned into a bath house for the Jews in 1942 was now serving as a residential home. There was a medical clinic in the place where the Jewish school had stood. The Villa Tereskawas now under the ownership of the teacher’s union.

To this day, it is not known how many Jews were killed and buried in the pits of Rabka. There are no remaining matzevot in the area of the cemetery. At the location of the mass graves of the Jews killed by the Nazis, sixteen concrete surfaces have been placed. There are also isolated, unmarked graves spread throughout the forest in the vicinity of what was Villa Tereska. The area of the cemetery is surrounded by an iron fence, with a Magen David etched on the entrance.

There is a sign on the gate explaining what the place is. There is a memory plaque etched with an inscription in Polish and Yiddish: “Respect to those resting here, who perished at the hands of the Hitlerite murderers 1941-1942”. A statue was built "in memory of the dead Jewish martyrs ", made from the matzevot that were found and collected in the area. The matzevot that were found apparently came from the cemetery in Jordanow.

In the area of the cemetery, two marble plaques were erected. One is from 1989, due to the generosity of the fund of the Pilar sisters. The second plaque has an inscription written in three languages, Hebrew, Yiddish and Polish: "My heart, my heart, for victims, the fence is built and the cemetery is renovated by Leib Gaterer from the city Frankfurt – born in Dobra, with the support of the city council of Rabka, in memory of the victims who were murdered and buried here during the years 1942-1944, may Hashem avenge their blood."

מושינה

Muszyna

עיירה בנפת נובי סונץ' במחוז פולין קטן, פולין.

העיירה ממוקמת כ-5 ק"מ מגבול סלובקיה, על אחת מדרכי המסחר העתיקות בין הונגריה  לדרום פולין וצפונה משם עד הים הבלטי. המקום מתועד לראשונה בשנת 1209 בתור יישוב שקיבל רשות מהמלך ההונגרי אנדריי השני לגבות מיסי מעבר על הנהר פופראד (Poprad).

בשנת 1311 המלך הפולני לוקייטק (Łokietek) סיפח את המקום לאדמות הכתר והעניק לו זכויות עיר. בשנת 1391 המלך הפולני ולדיסלב יאגיילו (Władysław Jagiełło) החזיר את מושינה ביחד עם זכויות העיר שלה לבעלותם של הבישופ של קרקוב. מאז ועד לסיפוחה של גליציה ע"י האימפריה האוסטרית, האזור האוטונומי של העיר היה מוכר עד בשם "מדינת מושינה" (Państwo Muszyński). מדינת מושינה האוטונומית החזיקה גם צבא משלה. במאות ה-16 וה-17 התיישבו במקום וואלאכים ורוסינים (שבט אוקראיני). מעמדה האואטונומי של העיר בוטל בשנת 1781.

בעיר התקיימו מספר ירידים שנתיים. המסחר התמקד בעיקר בצמר, באריגים ובצאן. בשנת  1874 נסללה מסילת הרכבת בין העיר טרנוב לסלובקיה אשר עברה דרך מושינה. בשנת  1911 הגיעה אליה גם המסילה מקריניצה. צומת הדרכים ומסילות רכבת תרמו לשגשוגו של  המקום. בסוף המאה ה-19 התגלו במקום מעיינות מרפאה מינרליים. בקרבת העיירה נמצאת שמורת טבע שבה יער של עצי תרזה מין הסוג שגודל רק שם ויחיד במינו בכל פולין. מושינה שיגשגה כעיירת מרפא וקייט.

בתום מלחמת העולם הראשונה מושינה נכללה בגבולות פולין העצמאית. 

 

היהודים במושינה

בכל שנות שלטון הבישופים של קרקוב על מושינה חל איסור על התיישבותם במקום של יהודים. עם סיפוח האזור לאימפריה האוסטרית ב-1772 בוטל האיסור על התיישבות היהודים במקום. המתיישבים היהודים הראשונים הגיעו מנובי סונץ' ומכפרי הסביבה. במפקד האוכלוסין של 1883 נמנו במקום 154 יהודים (8,3%). בשנת 1910 היו כבר במקום 433 יהודים שהם היוו 15,9% מכלל האוכלוסייה.

בשנת 1885 נתמנה כרב הקהילה הרב יחיאל נתן הלברשטאם (בנו של האדמו"ר מנובי סונץ', הרב משה הלברשטאם). בתחילה קהילת מושינה הייתה כפופה לקהילת נובי סונץ' (צאנז), אך החל מ-1890 הקהילה פעלה באופן עצמאי. במקום פעלו בית כנסת, חברת קדישא ובית עלמין. הקהילה של מושינה סיפקה שרותים גם ליהודי העיירה קריניצה.

בית הכנסת מאבן הוקם ב-1890. המצבה הראשונה בבית העלמין היא משנת 1900. משנת 1904 (ועד לשואה, שבה נספה) כיהן כרב הקהילה הרב אריה לייב הלברשטאט. הרב אריה לייב עמד גם בראש חצר חסידי צאנז במקום. במושינה הייתה גם חצר של חסידי בובוב (Bobowa).

בתקופה שבין שתי מלחמות העולם היהודים התפרנסו בעיקר ממסחר זעיר, רוכלות ומתן שרותים, עגון מזון כשר והסעדה כללית, בתי נופש ולינה למבריאים ונופשים אשר ביקרו בעיירה. מעל ל-30% מהמסעדות היו בבעלות יהודית. בעיר היו רק שני מלונות - אחד בבעלות של חיים ווייס, והשני, מלון "בריסטול", בהנהלת יחזקאל רייך.

לאחר מלחמת העולם הראשונה התקיימה במושינה פעיולת תרבותית ופוליטית ערה. במקום פעלו סניפים של הארגונים "הנוער הציוני", "עקיבא", "המזרחי", "הציונים הכלליים", ואגודת "השחר", אשר הכינה נוער לעליה לארץ ישראל. נפתחו ספריות שבהן התקיימו קורסים ללימוד עברית. הוקמה אגודת סוחרים יהודים, קופת צדקה "גמילות חסד" להלוואות כספים לנצרכים בתמיכת ארגון הג'וינט מארצות הברית. במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 1921 נמנו במושינה 423 יהודים מתוך אוכלוסייה כללית של 2,517 איש (16,8%). היחסים עם האוכלוסייה הנוצרית, הפולנית והאוקראינית, ידעו עליות ומורדות. בעקבות גל המהומות והפרעות האטישמיות בשנץ 1898 הוקם ארגון סוחרים פולני שקרא לחרם על המסחר היהודי. לאחר מותו של מנהיג פולין, המרשל יוזף פילסודסקי ב-1935, החלה עליה בתקריות עם כנופיות של לאומנים פולנים. ב-1936 פרצו מהומות אנטישמיות במושינה. אחד מיהודי המקום אשר התנגד להפצת כרוזי הסתה הוכה. כמו כן, נופצו זכוכיות ונבזזו חנויות היהודים. לאחר התערבות המשטרה הסדר הושב במקום. שלושה מהפורעים נידונו ל-2-3 חודשי מאסר.

בשנת 1938 אוכלוסיית היהודים במושינה מנתה 748 איש אשר היוו 23% מכלל התושבים.

 

תקופת השואה

ב-1 בספטמבר 1939 גרמניה הנאצית פלשה לפולין. מושינה נכבשה בידי הגרמנים בתחילת ספטמבר 1939. ב-17 בספטמבר 1939 ברית המועצות פלשה לפולין וכבשה את שטחי מזרח פולין עד לפאתי העיר לובלין. בהתאם להסכם מולוטוב ריבנטרופ לחלוקת פולין בין גרמניה הנאצית לברה"מ, הסובייטים מסרו את אזור לובלין לגרמנים וקיבלו לשליטתם את אזור ביאליסטוק. חלק מצעירי היהודים עברו לשטח הכיבוש הסובייטי.

מיד לאחר הכיבוש הגרמני היהודים חוייבו לעבוד בעבודות כפייה. על היהודים חל איסור ללכת על המדרחות והם חויבו לענוד סרט עם מגן דוד על השרוול. במושינה הוקם יודנראט ברשותו של יצחק ברודמן (ברוטמן?). היודנראט נדרש לספק לגרמנים אנשים לעבודות כפייה, לשלם קנסות המושתות על הקהילה על ידי הכובש ולדאוג לצרכים הבסיסיים של האוכלוסייה היהודית.

לגטו מושינה הובאו יהודים מהכפרים הסמוכים, וירכומלה מאלה (Wierchomla Mała), וירכומלה ויילקה (Wierchomla Wielka). מהכפר אנדז'יובקה (Andrzejówka) הובאו ארבעה בני משפחתו של בניימין קלאוזנר. בעבר התגוררו בכפר זה 10 יהודים. קלאוזנר ורוב משפחתו ניספו במחנה ההשמדה אושוויץ. שרדה רק אחת משתי בנותיו, סאלצ'יה.

ב-29 באוקטובר מתפרסם צוו לפיו יהודי מושינה וסביבתה חוייבו לעזוב את האזור הזה עד 30 בנובמבר 1940 ולהתרכז בגטאות אחרים. בסוף דצמבר 1940 חוסלה הקהילה היהודית במושינה. היהודים ממושינה פוזרו בין הגטאות בגריבוב, בובובה ונובי סונץ'. עם חיסול הגטו בנובי סונץ' היהודים נשלחו ברובם למחנות ההשמדה בבלז'ץ ואושוויץ.

בסוף דצמבר 1941 הוקם במושינה על יד המנסרה "הובאג" מחנה עבודה והובאו לשם יהודים בקבוצות של 150 איש מהגטאת נובי סונץ', סטארי סונץ', גריבוב, וגורליצה. כעבור זמן מה הקבוצה הוותיקה הוחזרה לגטו שלה ובמקומה הובאה קבוצה חדשה של יהודים. המחנה פורק בדצמבר 1942 והיהודים פוזרו בין מחנות עבודה אחרים, מקצתם הובאו לבית חרושת להרכבת מטוסים במיילץ. בארכיון אושוויץ רשומים 25 יהודים ממושינה אשר ניספו במחנה ההשמדה אושוויץ עד 1943.

 

לאחר השואה

מיהודי מושינה ניצלו שני אנשים אשר ברחו בתחילת הכיבוש הגרמני אל שטח הכיבוש הסובייטי. לאחר גירוש היהודים ממושינה בית הכנסת של המקום נשדד על ידי המשטרה האוקראינית ולאחר מכן המקום הוסב לאולם קריאה ומועדון התרבות האוקראינית.

לאחר המלחמה ולאחר הגליית האוכלוסייה האוקראינית מהמקום בשנת 1947, הבניין שימש כמחסן של האגודה הצרכנית המקומית. בשנת 1965 המבנה פורק.

בית העלמין של המקום ניצל ברובו. עומדות בו 84 מצבות. בחלקות אשר בצד ימין ישנן המצבות מתחילת המאה ה-20 ובצד שמאל נמצאת החלקה החדשה של שנות ה-1920. בית הקברות מכיל גם מספר קברים של נרצחי השואה. המקום מוקף בגדר. בשנת 1995 ה"קרן לזכרון עד" דאגה לניקוי וסידור שטח בית העלמין. לצד השביל המוביל לבית העלמין הוצבו שני שלטים. על אחד מהם צוייר מגן דוד והכתובת " בית קברות יהודי. השטח מוגן על פי חוק. כבד את מקום מנוחתם של המתים. שימור בית העלמין בוצע בתמיכתה של ה"קרן לזכרון עד". מושינה 1995".

על השלט הכוונה השני רשום: "בית עלמין יהודי, הוקם במאה ה-19 במוקם מתחת לחורשת אורנים, אחרי הסיבוב לרחוב אוגרודובה. מתוך 84 המצבות ששרדו על הקברים רק כמה קברים שופצו, היתר בדרגות שונות של נזק. הקברים הם של יהודים אשר התגוררו במושינה מתקופת החלוקות של פולין, (עד אז נאסרה התיישבות של כופרים במקום בידי הבישופים של קרקוב בעלי העיר). בשנים הראשונות של מלחמת העולם השנייה כל יהודי מושינה גורשו ונרצחו בגטאות של גריבוב ובובוב". ב-2016 "קרן ניסנבאום" הקימה גדר חדשה סביב בית העלמין.

תושבי המקום מצביעים על הככר הנמצא למרגלות גבעת המבצר כמקום שבו בוצע רצח המוני של יהודים. המידע לא מאומת, משום שידוע שהיהודים הוכרחו לעזוב את העיירה עוד בדצמבר 1940. יתכן שבמקום הזה נרצחו יהודים מאלה שהובאו אל מחנה העבודה שפעל במושינה בזמן הכיבוש הגרמני.

our Open Databases
Jewish Genealogy
Family Names
Jewish Communities
Visual Documentation
Jewish Music Center
Place
אA
אA
אA
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
The Jewish Community of Nowy Targ

Nowy Targ

Yiddish; ניימארקט, Naymarkt; German: Neumarkt

A town and seat of Nowy Targ district in Lesser Poland Voivodeship, Poland.

Nowy Targ was established in the 13th century and received official status as a town in the year 1346, under the reign of King Casimir the Great. During the 15th century, the town became the center of royal estates, as well as the headquarters of the king's representative. Nowy Targ was located on the route of merchant caravans traveling from Hungary during the 16th century; however, because of the city's location at the foot of the Tatra Mountains, there were also groups of robbers and smugglers who traveled on the same route. Nowy Targ experienced a significant economic decline during the 16th and 17th centuries, when revolts broke out against the king and his representatives. After the division of Poland at the end of the 18th century Nowy Targ, like all of western Galicia, was incorporated into the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

The town began to recover economically, and eventually flourished again during the 19th century. It became a center of folklore for the mountain towns, as well as a production center for folklore items made of wood, leather, glass, and metal, which were marketed throughout Poland. Between the two World Wars Nowy Targ served as a tourist and recreation center.

 

History

Until 1796 Jews were forbidden to live in the Tatra Region. As a result, at the beginning of the 18th century there was a Jewish-owned tavern in Nowy Targ, and only a few Jewish families lived in the town. Once certain professional Jews were granted the right to settle in certain areas, a number of Jews came to settle in Nowy Targ, as well as in the surrounding villages. After the 1860s, however, when all Jews were granted the right to settle where they chose, Nowy Targ’s Jewish population increased substantially. In 1880 there were 464 Jews living in Nowy Targ, a number that grew to 773 by 1890. Ten years later Nowy Targ’s Jewish population was 900.

In spite of the growth of the Jewish population in Nowy Targ at the end of the 19th century, the local press during that period complained of "spiritual abandonment" and of the town’s Jews following in "the ways of the gentiles.” Nevertheless, all was not lost: at the beginning of the 20th century only 10 Jewish pupils (out of a total of 63) studied in the general school, while the rest attended Jewish schools.

Nowy Targ’s Jewish community was initially affiliated with the larger community of Nowy Sacz. The Jewish community of Nowy Targ became independent during the 1860s. The first rabbi to serve the independent community was Rabbi Yaakov Yokal, the son of Rabbi Mordecai Zev-Wolf Hirsch, author of the book Birchat Yaakov. He officiated from 1862 until his death in 1880. He was succeeded in 1885 by Rabbi Chaim Dov-Ber, the son of Rabbi Shmuel Reuven Shturch, who served until his death in 1932. His son-in-law, Rabbi Eliahu Weiss, was then appointed; he served as the community's rabbi until 1942, when he was killed by the Nazis. In 1939 Rabbi Naftali, the son of Rabbi Yehuda Unger, was also appointed rabbi in Nowy Targ.

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries most of Nowy Targ’s Jews worked as merchants, though others worked as petty tradesmen and peddlers. Much of their livelihood was based on the many tourists who visited the town. As the community became more established, workers were able to establish a number of organizations and cooperatives that would help them achieve economic success. At the beginning of the 1920s, the merchants formed a 300-member association, and established a cooperative credit association. In 1937, when Poland was experiencing an economic decline, the cooperative contributed funds from its profits towards a mutual aid fund. Laborers and clerical workers organized in 1924, followed by craftsmen who organized in 1926 into the organization Yad Charutzim. A Jewish bank, Towarystwo Zaliczkowe, which was established in Nowy Targ by Jewish investors and managed by M. Papier.

There was a particular need for Jewish workers’ associations and mutual aid organizations during the interwar period since it was a time when antisemitism rose throughout Poland. Indeed, at the end of 1918, Jews in Nowy Targ established a Jewish militia for self-defense against groups that tried to harass the Jewish community. Jews were removed from public institutions and an economic boycott was imposed against them. The Jewish professional organizations and credit unions that had been established during the 1920s were needed in the 1930s to help the Jews survive.

Nowy Targ’s Jewish population in 1910 was 1,370 out of a total population of 9,225. After World War I (1914-1918) the number of Jews in the town decreased, and in 1921 there were 1,342 Jews living in the town. This decrease was both a result of immigration, and because some of the town’s Jews were persuaded by the Polish authorities to declare their nationality as Polish, and so they were not counted in the Jewish census.

After World War I the Jewish community council established a Jewish Aid Committee, as well as a cooperative Konsom, both of which were supported by the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee. Both organizations were tasked with providing financial aid, clothing, and food for needy Jews. In 1926 the community founded a mutual aid society for the purpose of providing loans; additional aid societies and social clubs were established during this period. WIZO was responsible for the soup kitchen, distributing meals to school children, and organizing summer camps. Meanwhile, a branch of the organization Zentus, as well as the Association for the Care of Jewish Children and Youth, cared for the children of the needy.

Czytelnica Zydowska was a center of cultural activity in the community. It was active before the First World War and opened a new building in 1919. The center also housed a large library and a lecture hall, where drama groups met and evening classes were conducted for youth and adults who wanted to study Hebrew and Judaism. A Yiddish cultural society named after the poet Morris Rosenfeld began to be active in 1925. A string orchestra was also active in the town.

Nowy Targ’s first Zionist organization was established in 1898, and a branch of Bnei Zion functioned at the start of the 20th century (in 1912 it became affiliated with the Zionist Federation of Western Galicia), but Zionism became particularly active between the two World Wars. Prominent Zionist organizations in Nowy Targ included He’Atid, Ha’Avodah, and the student organization HaKoach. A branch of HaShomer HaTzair opened in 1921. Later branches of Zionist organizations included the General Zionists (as well as its youth branch, Akiva), Hitachdut, Poalei Zion, HaMizrachi, and HaShachar. Dror Freiheit had a training kibbutz in Nowy Targ that sought to prepare its young Zionists for immigration to Palestine. In total, there were approximately 200 Jewish youth who were affiliated with the various Zionist movements in Nowy Targ. These young Zionists learned Hebrew, the history of the Jewish people through a Zionist lens, as well as Zionist ideology. A number of Jews contributed to the Jewish National Fund, and participated in elections to the Zionist Congress; 376 voters from Nowy Targ took part in the 1936 elections to the Zionist Congress.

The Zionist sports leagues HaGibor and Maccabi had branches that were active in the town. Though their activities focused on winter sports (Maccabi opened a local ski slope in 1932), they also played table tennis, and other light athletics. Both clubs united in 1936 to form the Nowy Targ Jewish League for Exercise and Sports.

In addition to Zionism, Nowy Targ’s Jews were active in a number of political causes. 406 members of the community voted in the 1928 elections to the Sejm (Polish Parliament), 359 of whom voted for the Jewish National List. A branch of Agudas Yisroel was founded in 1934. Additionally, although the communist youth organization was illegal, most of its members in Nowy Targ were Jewish.  

Educational institutions included a Talmud Torah. A supplementary Hebrew school, Hebrew Cheder, opened in Nowy Targ in 1927, and was followed in 1937 by a branch of the Yavneh school. In 1931 a Jewish students’ club established a society to grant aid to Jewish students studying in Nowy Targ’s high schools.

On the eve of World War II (1939-1945) there were approximately 3,000 Jews living in Nowy Targ, out of a total population of 13,000.


The Holocaust

After the Germans occupied Nowy Targ, those Jews who had not fled east were subject to increasing persecution. Jews were not permitted to shop in the general market, while Jewish-owned shops were seized and given to Aryans. There were groups of forced laborers organized daily, but even they were luckier than those who were taken as hostages, and who were never heard from again.

The Germans appointed a Judenrat, who were responsible for registering the Jewish population, providing the Germans with forced laborers, collecting the extortion money demanded by the Germans, and otherwise providing the Nazis with any item of value that they demanded.

Nowy Targ’s Jews began to be taken to labor camps at the beginning of 1940. The first group of about 100 youths was taken to work in the quarries at Zakopane.

The Judenrat and the local branch of the JSS (a Jewish organization for mutual aid) helped the needy, opened a public kitchen, and distributed food staples and medicines, but by the beginning of 1941 the community had become impoverished.  

A ghetto was established in Nowy Targ in May 1941. Jews from other areas were sent to Nowy Targ’s ghetto, and as a result by the beginning of 1942 there were 2,500 Jewish living in the ghetto.

The first major selection took place on August 30, 1942. More than 3,000 Jews were concentrated in the local sports arena. About 80 people who were old and sick were taken and killed in the cemetery. Those deemed to be essential workers were separated; the rest were ordered to turn over their remaining valuables, after which they were taken by train to the death camp Belzec. Those who tried to hide in the ghetto were discovered and killed on the spot. Most of those who found refuge among the Poles were turned in and also killed. In addition to those who were taken to the death camp, about 150 Jews were killed in the town itself.

100 people remained who were fit for work. A few of them were sent to work in the sawmills in Czarny Dunajec, while the others remained in a local labor camp; one group of Jews was responsible for handling the Jewish property that still remained in town. In 1943 a group of young men and women tried to escape from the camp. Those who were caught were executed, while the rest of the forced laborers were moved to the Plaszow labor camp.


Postwar

After the war several survivors returned to Nowy Targ. Four were killed almost immediately by a band of Polish nationalists. As a result of Polish anti-Jewish violence, both in Nowy Targ and elsewhere, the Jews left and the community was not renewed.

The synagogue in the city center was damaged, but the structure was returned to the Jews after the war. Nonetheless, it was taken over by the authorities shortly thereafter, who turned it into a movie theater named Tatra.

The Jewish cemetery in the center of the city was originally built in 1875 and enlarged in 1933. During the war it was desecrated by the Germans, and after the war Polish residents used the tombstones to pave the streets. Approximately 40 tombstones remained in the cemetery during the postwar period. In 1990 a monument was erected by the families of those from Nowy Targ in memory of the 2,000 Jews who were killed during the war.

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People

Muszyna
Rabka
Poland
Galicia
Mszana Dolna
Jordanow
Stary Sacz
Czarny Dunajec
Limanowa

מושינה

Muszyna

עיירה בנפת נובי סונץ' במחוז פולין קטן, פולין.

העיירה ממוקמת כ-5 ק"מ מגבול סלובקיה, על אחת מדרכי המסחר העתיקות בין הונגריה  לדרום פולין וצפונה משם עד הים הבלטי. המקום מתועד לראשונה בשנת 1209 בתור יישוב שקיבל רשות מהמלך ההונגרי אנדריי השני לגבות מיסי מעבר על הנהר פופראד (Poprad).

בשנת 1311 המלך הפולני לוקייטק (Łokietek) סיפח את המקום לאדמות הכתר והעניק לו זכויות עיר. בשנת 1391 המלך הפולני ולדיסלב יאגיילו (Władysław Jagiełło) החזיר את מושינה ביחד עם זכויות העיר שלה לבעלותם של הבישופ של קרקוב. מאז ועד לסיפוחה של גליציה ע"י האימפריה האוסטרית, האזור האוטונומי של העיר היה מוכר עד בשם "מדינת מושינה" (Państwo Muszyński). מדינת מושינה האוטונומית החזיקה גם צבא משלה. במאות ה-16 וה-17 התיישבו במקום וואלאכים ורוסינים (שבט אוקראיני). מעמדה האואטונומי של העיר בוטל בשנת 1781.

בעיר התקיימו מספר ירידים שנתיים. המסחר התמקד בעיקר בצמר, באריגים ובצאן. בשנת  1874 נסללה מסילת הרכבת בין העיר טרנוב לסלובקיה אשר עברה דרך מושינה. בשנת  1911 הגיעה אליה גם המסילה מקריניצה. צומת הדרכים ומסילות רכבת תרמו לשגשוגו של  המקום. בסוף המאה ה-19 התגלו במקום מעיינות מרפאה מינרליים. בקרבת העיירה נמצאת שמורת טבע שבה יער של עצי תרזה מין הסוג שגודל רק שם ויחיד במינו בכל פולין. מושינה שיגשגה כעיירת מרפא וקייט.

בתום מלחמת העולם הראשונה מושינה נכללה בגבולות פולין העצמאית. 

 

היהודים במושינה

בכל שנות שלטון הבישופים של קרקוב על מושינה חל איסור על התיישבותם במקום של יהודים. עם סיפוח האזור לאימפריה האוסטרית ב-1772 בוטל האיסור על התיישבות היהודים במקום. המתיישבים היהודים הראשונים הגיעו מנובי סונץ' ומכפרי הסביבה. במפקד האוכלוסין של 1883 נמנו במקום 154 יהודים (8,3%). בשנת 1910 היו כבר במקום 433 יהודים שהם היוו 15,9% מכלל האוכלוסייה.

בשנת 1885 נתמנה כרב הקהילה הרב יחיאל נתן הלברשטאם (בנו של האדמו"ר מנובי סונץ', הרב משה הלברשטאם). בתחילה קהילת מושינה הייתה כפופה לקהילת נובי סונץ' (צאנז), אך החל מ-1890 הקהילה פעלה באופן עצמאי. במקום פעלו בית כנסת, חברת קדישא ובית עלמין. הקהילה של מושינה סיפקה שרותים גם ליהודי העיירה קריניצה.

בית הכנסת מאבן הוקם ב-1890. המצבה הראשונה בבית העלמין היא משנת 1900. משנת 1904 (ועד לשואה, שבה נספה) כיהן כרב הקהילה הרב אריה לייב הלברשטאט. הרב אריה לייב עמד גם בראש חצר חסידי צאנז במקום. במושינה הייתה גם חצר של חסידי בובוב (Bobowa).

בתקופה שבין שתי מלחמות העולם היהודים התפרנסו בעיקר ממסחר זעיר, רוכלות ומתן שרותים, עגון מזון כשר והסעדה כללית, בתי נופש ולינה למבריאים ונופשים אשר ביקרו בעיירה. מעל ל-30% מהמסעדות היו בבעלות יהודית. בעיר היו רק שני מלונות - אחד בבעלות של חיים ווייס, והשני, מלון "בריסטול", בהנהלת יחזקאל רייך.

לאחר מלחמת העולם הראשונה התקיימה במושינה פעיולת תרבותית ופוליטית ערה. במקום פעלו סניפים של הארגונים "הנוער הציוני", "עקיבא", "המזרחי", "הציונים הכלליים", ואגודת "השחר", אשר הכינה נוער לעליה לארץ ישראל. נפתחו ספריות שבהן התקיימו קורסים ללימוד עברית. הוקמה אגודת סוחרים יהודים, קופת צדקה "גמילות חסד" להלוואות כספים לנצרכים בתמיכת ארגון הג'וינט מארצות הברית. במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 1921 נמנו במושינה 423 יהודים מתוך אוכלוסייה כללית של 2,517 איש (16,8%). היחסים עם האוכלוסייה הנוצרית, הפולנית והאוקראינית, ידעו עליות ומורדות. בעקבות גל המהומות והפרעות האטישמיות בשנץ 1898 הוקם ארגון סוחרים פולני שקרא לחרם על המסחר היהודי. לאחר מותו של מנהיג פולין, המרשל יוזף פילסודסקי ב-1935, החלה עליה בתקריות עם כנופיות של לאומנים פולנים. ב-1936 פרצו מהומות אנטישמיות במושינה. אחד מיהודי המקום אשר התנגד להפצת כרוזי הסתה הוכה. כמו כן, נופצו זכוכיות ונבזזו חנויות היהודים. לאחר התערבות המשטרה הסדר הושב במקום. שלושה מהפורעים נידונו ל-2-3 חודשי מאסר.

בשנת 1938 אוכלוסיית היהודים במושינה מנתה 748 איש אשר היוו 23% מכלל התושבים.

 

תקופת השואה

ב-1 בספטמבר 1939 גרמניה הנאצית פלשה לפולין. מושינה נכבשה בידי הגרמנים בתחילת ספטמבר 1939. ב-17 בספטמבר 1939 ברית המועצות פלשה לפולין וכבשה את שטחי מזרח פולין עד לפאתי העיר לובלין. בהתאם להסכם מולוטוב ריבנטרופ לחלוקת פולין בין גרמניה הנאצית לברה"מ, הסובייטים מסרו את אזור לובלין לגרמנים וקיבלו לשליטתם את אזור ביאליסטוק. חלק מצעירי היהודים עברו לשטח הכיבוש הסובייטי.

מיד לאחר הכיבוש הגרמני היהודים חוייבו לעבוד בעבודות כפייה. על היהודים חל איסור ללכת על המדרחות והם חויבו לענוד סרט עם מגן דוד על השרוול. במושינה הוקם יודנראט ברשותו של יצחק ברודמן (ברוטמן?). היודנראט נדרש לספק לגרמנים אנשים לעבודות כפייה, לשלם קנסות המושתות על הקהילה על ידי הכובש ולדאוג לצרכים הבסיסיים של האוכלוסייה היהודית.

לגטו מושינה הובאו יהודים מהכפרים הסמוכים, וירכומלה מאלה (Wierchomla Mała), וירכומלה ויילקה (Wierchomla Wielka). מהכפר אנדז'יובקה (Andrzejówka) הובאו ארבעה בני משפחתו של בניימין קלאוזנר. בעבר התגוררו בכפר זה 10 יהודים. קלאוזנר ורוב משפחתו ניספו במחנה ההשמדה אושוויץ. שרדה רק אחת משתי בנותיו, סאלצ'יה.

ב-29 באוקטובר מתפרסם צוו לפיו יהודי מושינה וסביבתה חוייבו לעזוב את האזור הזה עד 30 בנובמבר 1940 ולהתרכז בגטאות אחרים. בסוף דצמבר 1940 חוסלה הקהילה היהודית במושינה. היהודים ממושינה פוזרו בין הגטאות בגריבוב, בובובה ונובי סונץ'. עם חיסול הגטו בנובי סונץ' היהודים נשלחו ברובם למחנות ההשמדה בבלז'ץ ואושוויץ.

בסוף דצמבר 1941 הוקם במושינה על יד המנסרה "הובאג" מחנה עבודה והובאו לשם יהודים בקבוצות של 150 איש מהגטאת נובי סונץ', סטארי סונץ', גריבוב, וגורליצה. כעבור זמן מה הקבוצה הוותיקה הוחזרה לגטו שלה ובמקומה הובאה קבוצה חדשה של יהודים. המחנה פורק בדצמבר 1942 והיהודים פוזרו בין מחנות עבודה אחרים, מקצתם הובאו לבית חרושת להרכבת מטוסים במיילץ. בארכיון אושוויץ רשומים 25 יהודים ממושינה אשר ניספו במחנה ההשמדה אושוויץ עד 1943.

 

לאחר השואה

מיהודי מושינה ניצלו שני אנשים אשר ברחו בתחילת הכיבוש הגרמני אל שטח הכיבוש הסובייטי. לאחר גירוש היהודים ממושינה בית הכנסת של המקום נשדד על ידי המשטרה האוקראינית ולאחר מכן המקום הוסב לאולם קריאה ומועדון התרבות האוקראינית.

לאחר המלחמה ולאחר הגליית האוכלוסייה האוקראינית מהמקום בשנת 1947, הבניין שימש כמחסן של האגודה הצרכנית המקומית. בשנת 1965 המבנה פורק.

בית העלמין של המקום ניצל ברובו. עומדות בו 84 מצבות. בחלקות אשר בצד ימין ישנן המצבות מתחילת המאה ה-20 ובצד שמאל נמצאת החלקה החדשה של שנות ה-1920. בית הקברות מכיל גם מספר קברים של נרצחי השואה. המקום מוקף בגדר. בשנת 1995 ה"קרן לזכרון עד" דאגה לניקוי וסידור שטח בית העלמין. לצד השביל המוביל לבית העלמין הוצבו שני שלטים. על אחד מהם צוייר מגן דוד והכתובת " בית קברות יהודי. השטח מוגן על פי חוק. כבד את מקום מנוחתם של המתים. שימור בית העלמין בוצע בתמיכתה של ה"קרן לזכרון עד". מושינה 1995".

על השלט הכוונה השני רשום: "בית עלמין יהודי, הוקם במאה ה-19 במוקם מתחת לחורשת אורנים, אחרי הסיבוב לרחוב אוגרודובה. מתוך 84 המצבות ששרדו על הקברים רק כמה קברים שופצו, היתר בדרגות שונות של נזק. הקברים הם של יהודים אשר התגוררו במושינה מתקופת החלוקות של פולין, (עד אז נאסרה התיישבות של כופרים במקום בידי הבישופים של קרקוב בעלי העיר). בשנים הראשונות של מלחמת העולם השנייה כל יהודי מושינה גורשו ונרצחו בגטאות של גריבוב ובובוב". ב-2016 "קרן ניסנבאום" הקימה גדר חדשה סביב בית העלמין.

תושבי המקום מצביעים על הככר הנמצא למרגלות גבעת המבצר כמקום שבו בוצע רצח המוני של יהודים. המידע לא מאומת, משום שידוע שהיהודים הוכרחו לעזוב את העיירה עוד בדצמבר 1940. יתכן שבמקום הזה נרצחו יהודים מאלה שהובאו אל מחנה העבודה שפעל במושינה בזמן הכיבוש הגרמני.

Rabka

Since 1999: Rabka-Zdrój

In Yiddish: ראבקע / Rabke

A town in the district of Nowy Targ, in the Lesser Poland Voivodeship in Poland. Rabka was known as a spa town.

In 1254, the Polish Prince Bolesław Wstydliwy the Shy, awarded the land of Rabka to a monastery of the Cistercians monks. In 1364, the village transitioned to ownership of the crown. The Polish King Casimir III the Great awarded to Rabka city rights according to the Magdeburg Laws. In 1446, the city passed into the ownership by the local nobility. In 1570, they began to produce salt from the local springs.

After the first partition of Poland between the neighboring powers in 1772, Rabka was annexed by the Austrian Empire. In 1813, with the goal of preserving for themselves the salt production monopoly, the Austrians prohibited salt production in the area of Rabka, and even ordered the closure of the springs producing the salt. In 1847, a cholera plague broke out in the town, which claimed 266 victims, 30% of the local inhabitants. In 1858, it was discovered that the local salt spring water contained a high percentage of iodine and bromine, and based on that, the son of the nobleman Julian Zubrzycki built a clinic which attracted many vacationers. The construction in 1884 of a train station on the rail line that crossed Western Galicia contributed to the development of the place. At the end of World War I in 1918, Rabka was included within the borders of the independent Poland.

The Jews in Rabka

Until the annexation of Rabka by the Austrian Empire, Jews were prohibited from settling there. The prohibition was removed, and the presence of six Jews was documented in 1827. Anna Magdalena Goldberger, the daughter of Joachim Goldberger, one of the Jews, converted to Christianity. After her, Leah Firer, who was born in Chocholow in 1835, also converted to Christianity. Chaya, the daughter of Moshe Bloch, also converted to Christianity, and in 1861 Pesya, the daughter of Leybl Rigelhaupt, together with her first-born brother, the merchant Herman Rigelhaupt, and his wife Anna, the daughter of Moshe Bloch, and their seven children, converted to Christianity. In the 1840s, a tavern called Aulshitze was operating in Rabka, under the ownership of the merchant Moshe Bloch (who converted to Christianity). He was also owner of a workshop for dying and drying industrial cloth. The tavern closed in 1848.

In 1835, there were 34 Jews recorded in Rabka (0,5%), in 1845 there were 67 Jews (0,8%), and in 1855, 86 Jews lived there (1,6%). The Jewish community consolidated in Rabka in the second half of the 19th century, and in 1895 there were already 261 people (3,1%). The medical clinic of Rabka earned growing popularity among Jews of Poland. As a result, the demand for kosher catering services increased, which created new opportunities for earning a living in the community. Most Jews in Rabka did not observe traditionally Jewish ways of life. They didn't wear head coverings and did not dress differently from the Christian residents.

In Rabka, a number of guest houses were built for Jewish vacationers. Despite the fact that the guest houses were under Jewish ownership and that Rabka had hired a Jewish shochet named Tibinger, they had difficulty supplying kosher food. At the end of the 19th century, a synagogue was built, and a cemetery opened. In 1890, the Jewish fund named after Wilhelm and Maria Fränkel organized a summer camp for Jewish children from Krakow and the region called Łęgi. In 1907, a building was constructed for a project to provide convalescence for children. In 1923, there were 110 children staying in the building, and in 1927 there were 400 children being treated there.

After the conclusion of World War I, the number of Jews in the town decreased. In the population census of 1921, there were 172 Jews counted in Rabka. According to the population census of 1931, in the county of Nowy Targ, 2,571 Jews resided, 450 of them living in Rabka.

The local Jews were employed in small business, manual labor, managing liquor shops and  taverns, textile shops, bakers, and peddlers. The Jews were not involved in agriculture, although they leased land and owned agricultural farms. The richest Jew in Rabka during those years was Freundlich, the owner of a beer brewery that later turned into a milk plant.

The community of Rabka was an autonomous community within the Jordanow community. Beginning in the year 1887, Rabbi Israel Ber Naftali Hertz Schreiber was appointed as the rabbi of the entire community. In the 1930's, Rabka had its own rabbi, Rabbi Israel Rokach (who died in the Holocaust). The Community Council in Rabka financed the synagogue, and in 1934 the new mikveh and the funds for the poor, supporting a gemilut hasadim fund and other welfare for the poor, and contributed to meeting educational needs, including evening lessons for learning Hebrew.

In the period between the two World Wars, there were local political, cultural and public activities among the Jews, and also among the convalescents and vacationers. There were charity organizations active locally, such as the Bikur Cholim association. The American Joint organization financed the local Jewish doctor, who took care of children and poor convalescents without charging for the services. A union of Jewish merchants and an association of craftsmen established a charity fund in 1935 to provide loans for those in need.

There was an active Jewish school. The library of the Zionist Organization served the vacationers as well. There were branches of the Zionist organizations in the area - General Zionists, Bnei Akiva, Maccabi, and Betar.
 

The Holocaust

On September 1, 1939, Nazi Germany invaded Poland. The German Army, along with the Slovakian Army, captured Rabka on September 3, 1939. The Jews were commanded to immediately present themselves for forced labor. Restrictions were placed on their movement. They had to pay high ransoms, and were required to wear an armband with a Magen David.

Also, houses and factories under Jewish ownership were marked with a Magen David. The Germans and Christian thugs would often burst into Jewish apartments and plunder their possessions. A short while later, the Germans grabbed 13 Jews and took them to an unknown location.

On September 17, 1939, the Soviet Union invaded Poland and captured areas in the east. A portion of the 450 Jews that were in Rabka until the time of the German occupation moved to the Soviet controlled area in the east. At the end of 1939, a Judenrat was set up in Rabka headed by Freundlich, the owner of the beer brewery.

Among the 12 members were Sigmund Buksbaum, the Braunfeld brothers, Israel Zelinger and Zolman. A list of Jewish residents was prepared, according to gender, age, and profession. It fell upon the Judenrat to supply men for forced labor such as removing ruins, clearing snow from roads, and working in the sawmill. Forced labor applied to all Jews aged 14 to 60. The use of the Hebrew language was prohibited, and Jewish students were removed from the Polish schools.

Jews came to Rabka from other locations with the hope that the control and supervision over the Jews would be more tolerable. The number of Jews there grew until the end of March, 1941 to 1,500, of which 880 came from Krakow and the surroundings.

In 1940, a school for officers of the German security forces in the General Governate, Schule der Sicherheitspolizei und SD in GG, was moved from Zakopane to Rabka. The school was housed in a building called Villa Tereska, which was located on a hill on Sloneczna Street. The commander of the school was SS-Untersturmführer Wilhelm Rosenbaum, known as the “hangman from Rabka”. The German and Ukrainian cadets used the Jews as tools for learning terror, cruelty, oppression and murder. In 1941, in the forest next to Villa Tereska, bunkers were built, as well as a shooting range for training. The path to the range was paved with matzevot from the nearby cemetery as well as from the Jewish cemetery in Jordanow. The beautiful steps leading up to Villa Tereska were built from matzevot from the cemeteries in Jordanow and Mszana Dolna.

In 1941, the Germans concentrated the Jews in one area on Dluga Street, in an unfenced ghetto. Later, in three other buildings on Słona Street, a work camp was set up. About one hundred Jews resided there, brought from Nowy Sanz and Nowy Targ and the surroundings. They performed quarry work, the building of roads, and the expansion of the Villa Tereska. In February, 1942, the Jews were commanded to hand over all furs, warm clothing and ski equipment. Four men who did not comply  were executed. On April 28, 1942, seven Jews were killed in the streets. Between May and July of 1942, three transports brought Jews from Nowy Sanz for forced labor, at the request of Wilhelm Rosenbaum. On May 9 1942, the first transport arrived, which included between 60 and 200 people. The people who were not capable of working or who were not favored by Wilhelm Rosenbaum were shot on May 10 in the forest next to Villa Tereska.

The second transport included about 150 people. At the end of July, 100 Jews were sent from Nowy Sancz to Rabka. Among them were Orthodox Jews in traditional clothing. Only 90 people reached Villa Tereska, the rest were shot on the way. On May 22, 1942, Wilhelm Rosenbaum arranged a selection among the Jews of Rabka. He called from a list entire families. The people were held in a barn with no food or drink. On May 25, 1942, at four in the morning, 45 people from the list, the oldest and weakest among them, were taken to Villa Tereska. At 8 in the evening, the victims were brought to pits dug in the forest behind Villa Tereska. The Ukrainians and the guards ran them to the place of sacrifice, separate groups, each being struck along the way. The people were commanded to undress and stand next to the pits, and they were shot in the back of the head . Wilhelm Rosenbaum himself murdered six Jews. The sin of one of the murdered families from Rabka - two parents, a daughter aged 15 and a son aged 10 - was their family name, Rosenbaum. They were murdered so that friends wouldn't laugh at Wilhelm Rosenbaum for having a Jewish name.

In June, 1942, at the same time of an arrival of a transport of Jews from Nowy Sanz, the mass murder took place of another group, made up of 300 Jews, among them more than 200 Jews from Rabka and about 50 Jews from Nowy Sanz. On July 17, 1942, in another slaughter, about 100 Jews were murdered who came on a transport from Nowy Sanz, along with Jews from Krakow who were seeking refuge in Rabka.

Between August 28 and 30, 1942, Jews from Rabka were sent to the extermination camp at Belzec. About 200 Jews remained in the work camp. In December, 1942, about 100 of them were moved to the concentration camp in Plaszow. On September 1, 1943, the work camp was closed, some of the Jews were executed, and the last 70 or so were sent to Plaszow.
 

After the Holocaust

Rabka was freed by the Soviet Army on January 28, 1945. The few that were saved did not return to Rabka. In 1999, Rabka received the name Rabka-Zdroj. The synagogue building that the Germans had turned into a bath house for the Jews in 1942 was now serving as a residential home. There was a medical clinic in the place where the Jewish school had stood. The Villa Tereskawas now under the ownership of the teacher’s union.

To this day, it is not known how many Jews were killed and buried in the pits of Rabka. There are no remaining matzevot in the area of the cemetery. At the location of the mass graves of the Jews killed by the Nazis, sixteen concrete surfaces have been placed. There are also isolated, unmarked graves spread throughout the forest in the vicinity of what was Villa Tereska. The area of the cemetery is surrounded by an iron fence, with a Magen David etched on the entrance.

There is a sign on the gate explaining what the place is. There is a memory plaque etched with an inscription in Polish and Yiddish: “Respect to those resting here, who perished at the hands of the Hitlerite murderers 1941-1942”. A statue was built "in memory of the dead Jewish martyrs ", made from the matzevot that were found and collected in the area. The matzevot that were found apparently came from the cemetery in Jordanow.

In the area of the cemetery, two marble plaques were erected. One is from 1989, due to the generosity of the fund of the Pilar sisters. The second plaque has an inscription written in three languages, Hebrew, Yiddish and Polish: "My heart, my heart, for victims, the fence is built and the cemetery is renovated by Leib Gaterer from the city Frankfurt – born in Dobra, with the support of the city council of Rabka, in memory of the victims who were murdered and buried here during the years 1942-1944, may Hashem avenge their blood."

Poland

Rzeczpospolita Polska -  Republic of Poland 

A country in central Europe, member of the European Union (EU).

21st Century

Estimated Jewish population in 2018: 4,500 out of 38,500,000 (0.01%). Main umbrella organization of the Jewish communities:

Union of Jewish Religious Communities in Poland - Związek Gmin Wyznaniowych Żydowskich w Polsce (ZGWŻP)
Phone: 48 22 620 43 24
Fax: 48 22 652 28 05
Email: sekretariat@jewish.org.pl
Website: http://jewish.org.pl/

 

HISTORY

The Jews of Poland

1096 | Migration of the Heretics

Where did the Jews come to Poland from? Scholars are divided on this question, but many believe that some came from the Khazar Kingdom, from Byzantium and from Kievan Rus, while most immigrated from Western Europe – from the Lands of Ashkenaz.
One of the theories is that the “butterfly effect” that led the Jews of Ashkenaz to migrate to Poland began with a speech by Pope Urban II, who in 1096 called for the liberation of the holy sites in Jerusalem from the Muslim rule. The Pope's call ignited what would come to be known as The Crusades - vast campaigns of conquest by the Christian faithful, noble and peasant alike, who moved like a tsunami from Western Europe to the Middle East, trampling, stealing and robbing anything they could find along the way.
Out of a fervent belief that “heretics” were “heretics”, be they Jews or Muslims, the militant pilgrims made sure not to bypass the large Jewish communities in the Ashkenaz countries, where they murdered many of the local Jews, mostly in the communities of Worms and Mainz on the banks of the Rhine. Following these massacres, known in Jewish historiography as the Massacres of Ttn”u (after the acronym of the year of Hebrew calendar), Jews started migrating east, into the Kingdom of Poland.

1264 | The Righteous Among The Nations from Kalisz.

In the 13th century Poland was divided into many districts and counties, and to rule them all an advanced bureaucratic system was required. In 1264 the Polish prince Boleslav, also known as the Righteous One of Kalisz (Kalisz was a large city in the Kingdom of Poland) issued a bill of rights that granted the Jews extensive freedom of occupation as well as freedom of religious practice. This bill of rights (privilegium, in Latin) allowed many Jews – literate merchants, experts in economy, bankers, coin makers and more – to fill various roles in the administrative apparatus of the kingdom.
At that time, the Catholic Church in Poland was in the habit of disseminating all sorts of blood libels against the Jews. Article 31 of the Prince Boleslav of Kalisz's privilegium tried to rein in this phenomenon by stating: “Accusing Jews of drinking Christian blood is expressly prohibited. If despite this a Jew should be accused of murdering a Christian child, such charge must be sustained by testimony of three Christians and three Jews.”

1370 | From Esther to Esther

It turns out that Esther from the Scroll of Esther was not the only Esther who saved the Jewish people. Legend tells of a beautiful Jewish woman from Poland named Esther'ke who was a mistress of King Casimir II the Great of Poland (1310-1370) and even bore him two daughters.
It is unclear whether it was love that aroused Casimir's sympathy for the Chosen People. What is known is that according to legend, like the Queen Esther from the Purim story, Esther'ke also looked out for her people and asked the King to establish a special quarter for Jews in Krakow (and this quarter is no legend). The King acquiesced to his lover's request and named the quarter for himself – the Kazimierz Quarter. In addition, and this is no legend either, messengers were sent to all Jewish communities in Poland and beyond inviting the Jews to relocate to Krakow, then the capital of the kingdom.
The invitation to come to Poland was like a much-needed breath of air for the Jews of Ashkenaz, for those were the days in which the Black Death ravaged Europe, which for some reason was claimed to have “skipped” the Jews. For the audacity of not contracting the plague, the Jews faced baseless accusations of having poisoned the drinking wells in order to spread the plague.

1520 | A State Within a State

In the early 16th century the center of gravity of Jewish life gradually moved from the countries of Central Europe to locations all over Poland. According to various historical sources, in the late 15th century there were around 15 yeshivas operating throughout Poland. The study of Torah flourished in the large communities and became the central axis of Ashkenazi religious life. It is no surprise, therefore, that the common name for Poland among the Jews who lived there was “Po-lan-Ja” - or in Hebrew: "God resides here".
The status of the Jews in Poland had no equal at the time anywhere in the world. Almost everywhere else in Europe they were persecuted, expelled and subject to various restrictions, whereas in Poland they were granted a special, privileged status.
In the early 16th century there were some 50,000 Jews living in Poland. During these years an interest-based alliance began to form between the Jews and the Polish nobility. The nobles, wishing to avail themselves of the Jews' connections and skills in business management, appointed Jews to various positions in the management of their feudal estates and gave them bills of rights according them special status.
In 1520 the “Council of Four Lands” was established in Poland. This council, which was a sort of “state within the state”, was composed of the representatives of all the Jewish communities of Poland, from Krakow and Lublin to Vilnius and Lithuania (which were then still part of the Polish “Commonwealth”). The main function of the Council was to collect taxes for the authorities, and it enjoyed judicial autonomy based on Jewish halacha. The Council operated for 244 years, and is considered the longest-lasting Jewish leadership in history, at least since the First Temple Era.

1569 | Demon-graphics

In the year 1618 the authorities of Krakow appointed a commission to find the reasons for hostility between Jewish and Christian merchants. The chairman of the commission, an academic by the name of Sebastian Miczynski, found that the reason for the animosity was the rapid increase in the number of Jews in the city, stemming from the fact that “none of them die at war or from plague, and in addition they marry at age 12 and multiply furiously”.
Miczynski's conclusion was not without basis: The growth rate of the Jewish community in Poland, known in research as “The Polish Jewish demographic miracle”, was indeed astounding. By the mid 17th century the number of Jews in Poland reached several hundred thousand – about half of all Jews in the world. By the mid 18th century their numbers reached approximately one million souls.
However, although Miczynski's diagnosis was correct, the reasons he offered for it, which were heavily tainted by anti-Semitism, were unsurprisingly wrong. Various researchers have found that the reason for the relatively rapid growth of Jews in Poland was a low rate of infant mortality among them compared to the Christian population. Among the reasons for this one can offer are the culture of mutual aid prevalent among Jews, the fact that newlywed couples usually lived with the bride's family, which offered better nutrition, and the fact that Jewish religious laws enjoin better hygiene practices than were the norm in the rest of pre-modern Europe.
In 1569 Poland annexed large parts of Ukraine under the Treaty of Lublin. Many Jews chose to migrate to Ukraine, and found a new source of livelihood there – leasing land. This they once again did in conjunction with the Polish nobility. Many of the Ukrainian peasants resented the new immigrants. Not only did the feudal lords tax them heavily, they thought, now they also “enslave us to the enemies of Christ, the Jews.”
During this time some brilliant intellectuals emerged in the Jewish areas of Poland, including Rabbi Moses Isserles (aka “The Rema” after his acronym), Rabbi Shlomo Lurie and Rabbi Joel Sirkis, and the great yeshivas of Lublin and Krakow were founded. The rabbinical elite was also the political elite among the Jewish community, setting the rules of life down to the smallest detail – from the number of jewels a woman may wear to requiring approval by community administrators in order to wed.

1648 | Bohdan The Brute

Had there been a senior class photo of all the worst oppressors the Jewish people have known, Bohdan (also known as Bogdan) Khmelnytsky would probably be standing front and center in it. Khmelnytsky, the leader of the Ukrainian Cossacks who fought for independence against Poland, was responsible for particularly lethal pogroms against the Jews of Ukraine. These pogroms were fueled by a combination of Christian revival and popular protest against Polish subjugation. The Jews, who were seen as the Polish nobility's “agents of oppression” paid a terrible price: Approximately 100,000 of them were murdered in these pogroms.
The Khmelnytsky Massacres, also known in Jewish historiography as “The Ta”ch and Ta”t Pogroms”, left the Jewish community of Poland shocked and bereaved. The community's poets composed dirges and the rabbis decreed mourning rituals. A chilling account of these events can be found in the book “Yeven Mezulah” by Jewish scholar Nathan Hannover, who fled the pogroms himself and described them in chronological order. In time many works were written based on this account. The most famous are “The Slave” by Isaac Bashevis Singer, and the poem “The Rabbi's Daughter” by the great Hebrew poet and translator Shaul Tchernichovski.
Despite the grief and sorrow, the Jewish community of Ukraine soon recovered. Proof of this can be found in the accounts of English traveler William Cox, who wrote 20 years after the massacres: “Ask for an interpreter and they bring you a Jew; Come to an inn, the owner is a Jew; If you require horses to travel, a Jew supplies and drives them; and if you wish to buy anything, a Jew is your broker.”

1700 | A Very Good Name

The year 1700 saw the birth of the man who would reshape Orthodox Judaism and become the founder of one of the most important movements in all its long history: Rabbi Israel Ben Eliezer, far better known as the Baal Shem Tov, or The Besh”t for short.
The Baal Shem Tov began his career as a healer with herbs, talismans and sacred names, thus becoming known as a “Baal Shem” - a designation for someone who knows the arcana of the divine names, which he can use to mystical effect.
Rumor of the righteous man who performs miracles and speaks of a different Judaism – less academic and scholarly, more emotional and experiential – soon spread far and wide. Religious discourse soon included terms such as “dvekut”, which means “devotion”, and “pnimiut”, meaning “inner being”. Thus was the Hasidic movement born, emphasizing moral correctness and the desire for religious devotion, placing a high premium on the discipline of Kabbalah. The immense success of Hasidism stemmed from its being a popular movement which allowed entry to any Jew, even if he wasn't much for book smarts.
The Besh”t also set the template for the form of the Hasidic circle: A group of people coalescing around the personality of a charismatic leader who provides each member with personal guidance. Among the most famous Hasidic movement today one can count Chabad/Liubavitch, Ger and Breslov, which was founded by Rabbi Nachman of Breslov (the great-grandson of the Besh”t), and is unique in having no single leader or “Rebbe” or Admor, a Hebrew acronym which stands for “Our Master, Teacher and Rabbi”, the title of other Hasidic leaders, as none is considered worthy to carry the mantle of the founder.
Those were also the years in which Kabbalist literature began to spread in Poland, along with various mystical influences, including the Sabbatean movement. One of the innovation of the Kabbalist literature was the way in which the issue of observing commandments was perceived: In establishment rabbinical thought, the commandments were seen as a device for maintaining community structures and the religious lifestyle. The Hasidim, on the other hand, claimed that the commandments were a mystical device through which even a common man may effect changes in the heavenly spheres. In modern terms one may say that the meaning of observing the commandments was “privatized”, ceasing to be the property of the rabbinical elite and becoming the personal business of every common observant Jew.

1767 | What Came First – Wheat or Vodka?

To paraphrase the eternal questions of “what came first – the chicken or the egg?” 18th century Poles asked “What came first – wheat or vodka?” What they meant is, was it the great profitability of grain-based liquor that created mass alcohol addiction, or was it the addiction to alcohol that created the demand for wheat? Either way, the idea of turning wheat into vodka had a magical draw for Jews in the steppes of Poland. In the second half of the 18th century vodka sales accounted for approximately 40% of all income in Poland. The Jews, who recognized the immense financial potential of this trade, took over the business of leasing liquor distilleries and taverns from the nobles. In fact, historians have determined that some 30% of all Jews in the Commonwealth of Poland-Lithuania had some connection to the liquor business.
But liquor was far from the only field of commerce the Jews of Poland engaged in. They traded all manner of goods. In a sample of data from the years 1764-1767, collected from 23 customs houses, it was found that out of 11,485 merchants, 5,888 were Jews, and that 50%-60% of all retail commerce was held by Jewish merchants.
The reciprocal relations between the Jews and the Magnates, the Polish nobility, became ever tighter. Save for rare phenomena, such as the habit of some nobles to force Jews to dance before them in order to humiliate them, these relations were stable and dignified. Historians note that the Jewish leaser “was not a parasite cringing in fear, but a man aware of his rights, as well as his obligations”.

1795 | The Empires Swallow Poland

Until the partition of Poland, Poland's Jews could live in cities such as Krakow or Lublin, for example, with almost no direct contact with the outside political and legal authorities. Most of them resided in towns or hamlets (“Shtetl”, in Yiddish) where they lived in a closed cultural and social bubble. They spoke their own language, Yiddish, and their children were taught in separate institutions – the cheder for young children and then the Talmud-Torah. The legal system and political leadership were also internal: The tribunals and the Kahal, which operated on the basis of halacha, were the sole court of appeals for the settling of disputes and disagreements.
The only connection most Jews had with the outside world was in their work, which usually involved leasing of some sort from the nobles. Proof of this can be found in the words of Jewish storyteller Yechezkel Kutik, who wrote that “In those days, what was bad for the paritz (the Polish feudal lord) was at least partly bad for the Jews. Almost everyone made their living from the paritz”.
In 1795 Poland was partitioned between three empires – Russia, Austria and Prussia, the nucleus of modern Germany. This brought an end to the shared history of Poland's Jews, and began three distinctly different stories: That of the Jews of the Russian-Czarist Empire, that of the Jews of Galicia under Austrian rule, and that of the Jews of Prussia, who later became the Jews of Germany.
The situation for Jews in Austria and Prussia was relatively good, definitely when compared to that of Jews living under Czarist rule, which imposed various financial edicts upon them and allowed them freedom of movement only within the Pale of Settlement, where conditions were harsh. The nadir was the outbreak of pogroms in the years 1881-1884, which led to the migration of some 2 million Jews to the United States – the place that would come to replace Poland as the world's largest host of Jews. Upon the partition of Poland, most Jews living in that country found themselves under Russian rule. Please see the entry “The Jews of Russia” for further information regarding them.

1819 | The Jews of Galicia

The image of the “Galician Jew” was and still is a code not only for a geographic identity, but mostly for a unique Jewish identity which combined a multicultural-ethnicity with a cunning, humorous, warm and sympathetic folklore figure. The “Galician Jew” could be a devout Hasid, an enlightened educated person, a Polish nationalist or a Zionist activist, a great merchant or a vendor trudging from door to door. This Jew was weaned on several different cultures and could gab in several tongues – German, Yiddish, Hebrew, Russian and Polish.
Galicia extended over the south of Poland. Its eastern border was Ukraine, but the Austrian empire ruled over it from 1772 to the end of WW1. In the second half of the 19th century Austrian Emperor Franz Joseph granted the Jews fully equal rights. The city of Lvov became a magnet for educated Jews from all over Europe. Yiddish newspapers, including the “Zeitung”, operated there at full steam, commerce flourished and Zionist movements, among them Poalei Zion, played a central role in reviving Jewish nationality.
At the same time the Hasidic movement also flourished in Galicia, branching out from several Hasidic courts and dynasties of “Tzadiks”. Among the best known of these Hasidic sects were those of Belz and Sanz, which preserved the traditional Hasidic lifestyle, including dress and language, and maintained tight relations with the “Tzadik” who headed the court.
Galicia was also the soil from which the writers of the age of Haskala (the Jewish Enlightenment movement) grew – from Joseph Perl, the pioneer of Hebrew literature, who in 1819 wrote “Megale Tmirin” (“Revealer of Mysteries”), the first Hebrew novel, and ending with Yosef Haim Brenner and Gershon Shofman, who lived in Lvov and skillfully described Jewish life there in the early 20th century.
The multicultural, equal-rights idyll ended for the Jews of Galicia against the backdrop of cannon shells and flames of WW1. The region of Galicia passed from hand to hand between the Austrian and Russian armies, and the soldiers of both massacred the Jews again and again. This is what S. (Shloyme) Ansky, author of “The Dybbuk” and the writer who commemorated the fate of Galician Jews during the war, wrote on the subject: “In Galicia an atrocity beyond human comprehension has been committed. A large region of a million Jews, who but yesterday enjoyed all human and civil rights, is surrounded by a fiery chain of iron and blood, cut off and set apart from the world, given to the rule of wild beasts in the form of Cossacks and soldiers. The impression is as though an entire tribe of Israel is becoming extinct.”

1862 | The Siren Call of HaTsefira

While the Haskala, the Jewish Enlightenment movement, was born in Western Europe, its echoes soon reached the eastern part of the continent as well, and Poland in particular. One of the seminal events illustrating the roots put down by the Haskala movement in Poland was the founding of the periodical “HaTsefira” in Warsaw. “HaTsefira” became one of the most highly-regarded Hebrew newspapers and sought to take a real part in the process of secularizing the Hebrew language and turning it from a liturgical tongue to a living, everyday medium.
The newspaper gained steam in the late 1870s, when the editorial board was joined by Nachum Sokolov, journalist, author and Zionist-national thinker, who in his latter years served as President of the World Zionist Organization. Sokolov gradually reduced the emphasis of “HaTsefira” on popular science, giving it a serious journalistic and literary character instead. Under his leadership the periodical became a daily in 1886, and soon stood out as the most influential Hebrew newspaper in Eastern Europe, until it died out in the decades between the World Wars.
All of the most prominent Hebrew writers of those days published their works in HaTsefira: Mendele Mocher Sforim, Y.L.Peretz and Shalom Aleichem in the 19th century, Dvorah Baron, Uri Nissan Genessin, Shalom Ash and Yaacov Fichman in the early 20th century, and just before WW1 it was home to the works of a few promising youngsters, including Nobel-winning authour Shmuel Yosef Agnon and acclaimed nationalist poet Uri Zvi Greenberg.

1900 | Warsaw

In the first decade of the 20th century Warsaw became the capital of the Jews of Poland and a global Jewish center. The city was home to the headquarters of the political parties, many welfare institutions, trade unions, and Jewish newspapers and periodicals published in a variety of languages. Prominent in particular was juggernaut of literary and publishing activity in this city from the 1880s to the eve of WW1.
Among the most famous literary institutions of the period were the Ben Avigdor Press, which ignited the realist “New Movement” in Hebrew literature; Achiassaf Press, founded by the tea magnate Wissotzky, which operated in the spirit of Achad Haam and published books of a Jewish-historical nature; the HaShiloach newspaper, which was copied from Odessa and was edited for a year by Chaim Nachman Bialik (later anointed national poet of the State of Israel), the newspapers “HaTsofeh” and “HaBoker” and more.
All these and many others were produced at hundreds of Hebrew printing presses which popped up like mushrooms after a rain. This industry attracted Jewish intellectuals who found work writing, editing, translating and doing other jobs required by publishing and the press. In his essay “New Hebrew Culture In Warsaw” Prof. Dan Miron wrote that: “All the Hebrew writers of the time passed through Warsaw, some staying for years and others for a short time”.
Also famous were the “literary tribunals”, especially that of author Y.L. Peretz, who held a sort of salon or court at his home which was frequented by eager literary cubs. These would submit their callow works to the revered giant of letters and tremblingly await his verdict. The Peretz court was far from the only one, though. Jewish writers and intellectuals arrived from all over Russia to “literary houses”, “salons” and other establishments, convened mostly on Sabbaths and holidays to discuss matters of great import. One of the most famous of these was the home of pedagogue Yitzchak Alterman, whose lively Hanukkah and Purim parties drew many intellectuals. These, we assume, served as inspiration for little Nanuchka, the host's son, later to become famous as poet Nathan Alterman.

Jewish Demographics In Warsaw

Year | Number of Jews
1764 1,365
1800 9,724
1900 219,128
1940 393,500
1945 7,800


1918 | The First Jewish Party in Poland

Upon the end of WW1 the Jews of Poland also fell victim to the game of monopoly played by Poland against its neighbors, particularly Soviet Russia. The Poles accused the Jews of Bolshevism, the Soviets saw them as capitalists and bourgeoisie, and these accusations turned into dozens of pogroms and tens of thousands of Jewish murder victims.
In 1921, after 125 years under various occupiers, Poland once again became a sovereign and independent state. At first the future seemed bright. The new Polish constitution guaranteed the Jews full equality and promised religious tolerance. However, like many of the supposedly democratic states formed between the two world wars, the regime in Poland also swayed between the values of Enlightenment and equality and an ethnic-based nationalism.
This was the unstable reality under which the Jews of Poland lived for 18 years, until the start of WW2. During these years the Jews experienced some bad times, during which for example they were banned from public office, and were discriminated against in matters of taxation and higher education admissions, where quotas were set limiting the number of Jews at the universities. At other times, mostly under the reign of Jozef Pilsudski (1926-1935), who was known for his relative opposition to anti-Semitism, the edicts issued against the Jews were eased.
During the Pilsudski era the Jewish parties combined to form a joint list for the legislative elections, winning 6 seats in the Sejm (lower house of the Polish parliament) and 1 in the senate, which made them the sixth-largest party. This was a mere 11 years before the outbreak of WW2 and the Holocaust of Polish Jewry.
One of the most influential figures among Jewish political leadership in Poland was Yitzhak Gruenbaum (Izaak Grünbaum), leader of the General Zionists Party, who foresaw the rise of dictatorial elements in the Sejm and made aliyah in 1933. He was right. From 1935 until the German invasion Poland was ruled by an openly dictatorial, anti-Semitic regime. During these four years some 500 anti-Semitic incidents took place, the system of “ghetto benches” was put in place, separating Jewish and Polish students at universities, and the employment options of Polish Jews were limited to such a degree that the Jewish community of Poland, numbering over three million people at the time, was considered the poorest diaspora in Europe.

1939 | The Holocaust of the Jews of Poland

September 1st, 1939, the day the Nazis invaded Poland, was etched into the collective Jewish memory in infamy. Of 3.3 million Jews who lived in Poland on the eve of the Nazi invasion, only around 350,000 survived. Some 3 million Polish Jews were exterminated in the Holocaust.
The annihilation of the Jews of Poland took place step by step. It began with various decrees, such as the gathering of Jews in ghettos, the obligation to wear an identifying mark, the imposition of a curfew in the evenings, the marking of Jewish-owned stores and more – and ended with the execution of the “Final Solution”, a satanic plan of genocide, which culminated in the deportation of the Jews of Poland to the extermination camps of Auschwitz, Majdanek, Sobibor, Chelmno and Treblinka – all located on Polish soil.
One of the best known expressions of resistance by the Jews of Poland to the Nazi plan of annihilation was the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. The revolt symbolized a triumph of spirit for the Jews of the ghetto, who embarked on it although they knew that their chances of winning or even surviving were nil.
Alongside the armed resistance by the Jews of the ghetto there was also cultural resistance. In October 1939 Emanuel Ringelblum – a historian, politician and social worker – started the “Oneg Shabbat” (“Sabbath Delight”) project in the ghetto, in which he was joined by dozens of intellectuals including authors, teachers and historians. This collective produced many works of writing on various facets of life in the ghetto, and thus became an archive and think tank dealing with current events while documenting them for future historians' reference.
In August 1942, in the midst of the deportation of the Jews of Warsaw, the archive was divided in three and each part buried for safe-keeping. Two of the three parts, secreted in metal crates and two milk jugs, were found after the war. These two parts, located in 1946 and 1950, serve to this day as imported first-hand sources on Jewish life in the ghetto, and also as testament to the courage and spiritual strength of the intellectuals whose only weapons were the pen and the camera.

2005 | Jewish Renaissance in Poland?

At the end of WW2 there were some 240,000 Jews living in Polish territories, 40,000 of them who survived the camps and another 200,000 refugees, returning from the Soviet Union territories. The displaced Jews lived in poverty and cramped conditions, and were treated with hostility by the general population despite their attempts to integrate into Polish society. In July 1946, just a year after the war ended, this hostility erupted in a pogrom in the city of Kielce. The pretext for the murder of 42 out of 163 Holocaust survivors in the city, and the wounding of most of the rest? The ancient blood libel about matza and Christian children.
This is where the Zionist movement swung into action, managing to smuggle about 100,000 of the remaining Jews in Poland to Israel under the “Bricha”, or “Escape” movement.
After WW2 Poland became a Communist country, which it remained until 1989. 1956 saw the start of the “Gomulka Aliyah” (named after Wladislaw Gomulka, Secretary General of the Polish Communist party), which lasted for a few years and brought some 35,000 more Jews to Israel from Poland. In 1967 Poland cut off relations with Israel and in 1968, amidst an anti-Semitic incitement campaign, another few thousand Jews made aliyah. This practically brought an end to the Jewish community of Poland.
At the start of the new millennium, Poland was considered the greatest mass grave of the Jewish people. The numbers speak for themselves: Before WW2 there were around 1,000 active Jewish communities in Poland, but in the year 2000 only 13 remained. Before the war Warsaw was home to almost 400,000 Jews. In 2000 only 1,000 Jews remained.
And then, at the start of the new century, a so-called “Jewish Renaissance” took place in Poland, and is still going on today. In 2005 a museum was opened across the street from the Warsaw Ghetto, where 1,000 years of Jewish history in Poland are on display. Once a year a Jewish festival is held in Krakow, exposing thousands of curious visitors from all over the world to Jewish songs and dance, kleizmer music and Yiddishke food. The Jewish theater is thriving (although it includes but one Jewish actor), and around the country “dozens of “Judaica Days” and symposiums on Jewish topics are held annually.

* All quotes in this article, unless otherwise stated, are from “From a People to a Nation: The Jews of Eastern Europe, 1772-1881”, Broadcast University Press, 2002

Galicia

Yiddish: גאַליציע (Galitsye); Polish: Galicja ; German: Galizien; Ukranian: Галичина (Halychyna); Russian: Galitsiya; Hungarian: Gácsország; Romanian: Galiţia; Czech, Slovak: Halič

Geographically part of east Europe, in S.E. Poland and N.W. Ukraine. Galician roots derive from the name of the Ukrainian town Halicz (in Ukranian: Halych), in the Middle Ages part of the Kyivan Rus.
 

21st Century

The special life and culture of the Galician shtetl of the olden days remain with us in the history, in the shtetls of the past, and in Hassidic stories and books.

The Galicia Jewish Museum in Kazimierz established in 2004 commemorates the victims of the Holocaust and holds on to Jewish Galician culture.

 

History

Galicia had great significance in the history of the Jewish European Diaspora. The Jews of Galicia formed a bond between the Jews of East and West Europe.

The Kingdom of Galicia was first established on land given to the Habsburg Empire with the first partition of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth of 1772. Six towns amongst them Brody, Belz and Rogatin were close to entirely Jewish populated. Previous to the 1772 partition, Galicia was the Little Poland. The Galician Kingdom as such lasted until the early 20th century. The first chief rabbi (Oberlandesrabbiner) of Galicia was Aryeh Leib Bernstein with seat in Lemberg. After 1772 further lands were acquired to the Kingdom, and extended Galicia to the north and north west. The small Republic of Krakow joined the Kingdom in 1846 with the territory encompassing over an area of 20,000 square miles and this remained as such until the end of the Kingdom (1918). The 1860’s saw efforts toward democratic changes ensued by a period of an autonomous Galicia from 167-1918. Galicia was covered in the Emperor Joseph II (Josef Benedikt Anton Michel Adam), Holy Roman Emperor, statutes for the betterment of Jewish life. Amongst others, Jews were to take on German family names and governmental schools were set for the education of Jews. 

Galicia had historically during its existence under the Habsburg regime, been the land with one of the highest percentages of Jewish populations worldwide. At the time of the region's annexation to the Habsburg Empire in 1772, the Jewish population numbered 224,980 (9.6% of total), in 1857 448’971 (9.7%) and 871,895 (10.9%) in 1910. Distinguishing them from the rest of the Habsburg population was their Orthodox Judaism with distinctive mannerism, clothes and language. Their communities established commercial and trading platforms. In the towns, also smaller ones, Jews occupied retailing and craftsmanship work for household and garment ware such as textile, tailoring, hatters and furriers. Foreign trade was largely Jewish business with Russia, Turkey and Germany.

The last decades of the 18th century already saw the beginnings of the Haskalah with flourishing social and cultural Jewish life in those days and early 19th centuyr with its golden days from 1815-mid 19th century in Galicia with its center in Brody. Euducation and literature blooming in the 19th century, formed Galicia into a center for Judaism in creation and intellect while traditional Jewish learning was nevertheless not neglected in that century. Those days did see struggles between Hassidim and Mitnaggedim, Hassidim and Haskalah. Prominent figures came from the Belz dynasty, Zanz and Ruzhin. In the large cities Reform synagogues were sacred, the Lvov leadership placed a Reform Rabbi Abraham Kohn in the late 1830s who however faced severe adversity in 1848. There were Jewish schools with German as language of instruction and the 1830 and 1840s saw growth and increased influence of Maskilim. This twin striving for Haskalah and assimilation towards German culture took a change in the 60s and 70s, with the reigns shifting to more university oriented representatives alongside a trend accompanied by the strongly Orthodox to an absorption to more local Polish culture and policy. In the revolutionary parliament of 1848 sat a few Jews from Galicia. At the time some adverse policies were revoked by the government. In parallel there was an amelioration in the economic situation of Jews which also saw a heightened shift of Jews into the farming sector including the development of experimental Jewish farms.

From the late 1860s a separation occurred of the Aggudat Ahimm, the Polish assimilationists, from the German assimilationists. The former adherents of Orthodoxy brought together a rabbinical conference in Lvov which ruled that community voting was dependent upon adherence of members to the Shulhan Arukh. In that century there were several weekly and monthly periodicals published in Galicia in Hebrew and Yiddish. There occurred also from the 1860-1880s an anti-assimilationist tendency and new directions in Haskalah. This was greatly influenced by Peretz Smolenskin a Zionist and Hebrew writer. He was concerned with the Halaskah movement, an early and strong proponent of Jewish nation-state building and rejectionist of Judaism’s westernization. A first society for Palestine settlement was established in 1875 in Przemysl, south-east Poland and in the 1880s the Hovevei Zion gained ground. This was accompanied by increasing antisemitism on Polish territory with the assimilationist Aguddat Ahim halting publication in 1884 of written materials and going insofar as declaring the only Jewish future as emigration of Palestine or conversion to Christianity. Early Zionist organizations were established and publications were issued in the region of Lvov. In the early 1890s economic boycotts were imposed on Jews from exclusion on trade in agricultural goods and merchandize, alcohol and more. The Jewish population in Galicia faced poverty. Nevertheless, Zionist movements continued their efforts.

Alongside, the early 20th century saw the development of neo-romantic Yiddish literature mostly coming from the area of Lvov and influenced by a corresponding phenomenon in Vienna. One prominent writer was Shmuel Yosef Agnon (1888-1970) who would come to monument the Galician shtetls. Those days also saw the translation into the Yiddish of foreign literature. Such representatives were the Oscar Wilde, of which one of his most famous works are the humorous ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’. World War I saw many Galician Jews flee to Hungary, Bohemia and Vienna, and in particular educated Galician Jews find refuge in Vienna. Those remaining suffered greatly under the Russians entry into Galicia. Ensuing in 1918 with the Polish-Ukranian war the unfortunate situation of minorities on Polish land increasingly led to the crumbling of the once Jewish-inspired Kingdom of Galicia. The Polish Republic took over the Galician land. Notwithstanding, deference to German and Polish culture and to the Polish nation, Hassidism and Zionist striving continued to sprout in the years until 1939, inklings of the Galician world remained with Hassidic communities as in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and New York. 

Galicia had historically during its existence under the Habsburg regime, been the land with one of the highest percentages of Jewish populations worldwide. Distinguishing them from the rest of the population were their Orthodox Judaism with distinctive mannerism, clothes and language. Their communities established commercial and trading platforms. With the mid-19th century nevertheless this population saw beginnings of wearing out. Those were the days of the onset of the Haskalah (Jewish enlightenment) with family life adhering to Orthodox Judaism while modernizing outwardly and seeing an improved standing in society and economy and reduced isolation. The trend was of assimilation of Galician Jews to Germans and then to Poles. This trend of the last decades of the 19th century amongst Galician Jews went in parallel to the Marxist striving for a workers’ revolution.

משאנה דולנה

Mszana Dolna

ביידיש: אמשענע

עיירה בנפת לימנובה (Limanowa) במחוז פולין קטן, פולין.

היישוב מתועד לראשונה בשנת 1365, בשנת 1369 המלך הפולני קאזימיר הגדול מעניק ל משאנה דולנה זכויות עיר. השם "דולנה" ("תחתית") נוסף כדי להבדיל את מקום מיישוב שכן שקיבל זכויות באותו הזמן ונקרא משאנה גורנה ( Mszana Górna  - משאנה עילית). במשך הזמן שני היישובים התאחדו למועצה אחת. מיקומה של העיר על דרך המסחר בין פולין להונגריה והזכות לקיים ירידידים תרמו לשגשוגו של היישובץ בזמן פלישת השבדים לפולין (1660-1655) העיר נשרפה כליל. לאחר ההרס המקום לא התאושש והמשיך להתקיים בקושי ככפר קטן שאנשיו עסקו בעיקר בחקלאות. בשנת 1772, לאחר חלוקת פולין   הראשונה בין המעצמות השכנות, משאנה דולנה סופחה לאימפריה האוסטרית ונכללה בחבל גליציה המערבית. ב-1821 נבנה דרך חדשה אל העיירות הסמוכות ראבקה ולימנובה אשר תרמה להתאוששות ההדרגתית של המקום. בכפר הוקמו מפעלי תעשייה אחדים ובשנת 1884 תחנת רכבת על מסילת הרכבת שחיברה את בין חלקיה המערבים לאלה המזרחיים של חבל גליציה. בזמן מלחמת העולם הראשונה (1918-1914) לחם באזור משאנה הלגיון הפולני בפיקודו של רידז-שמיגלי כיחידה בצבא אוסטריה. בתום מלחמת העולם הראשונה משאנה דולנה נכללה בגבולות פולין.
 

היהודים במשאנה דולנה

התיישבות היהודים במשאנה דולנה התחילה במחצית המאה ה-19, עד אז הגיעו לאזור רק יהודים בודדים. היהודים הראשונים היו חוכרי בתי מרזח אשר קיבלו אישור לכך מבני האצולה המקומיים. ב-1880 התקיימה במקום קהילה עצמאית של 217 יהודים (12,1%) וברשותה היו בית כנסת, מקווה ובית עלמין. רוב יהודי המקום התפרנסו ממסחר זעיר, מרוכלות וממלאכה. ב-1891 נתמנה לרב המקום הרב יוסף הולנדר. כהונתו נמשכה עד 1912. לאחר פטירתו ועד 1938 כיהן ברבנות בנו, הרב נתן דוד. בנו של נתן דוד, הרב אהרון אריה הולנדר היה אחרון רבני משאנה דולנה והוא נספה בשואה.

ערב מלחמת העולם הראשונה (1918-1914) הקהילה גדלה עד 535 יהודים. בנובמבר  1918, כאשר חיילי הלגיון הפולני של גנרל האלר הגיעו למשאנה דולנה וערכו פרעות ביהודי המקום. הם פרצו לבתי היהודים וביזזו אותם. בעיניהם של החיילים האלה היהודים נחשבו למשתפי פעולה עם השלטונות האוסטריים. במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 1921, נמנו במשאנה דולנה 410 יהודים שהם היוו 13,5% מתוך 3,016 כלל תושבי המקום. היחסים בין היהודים לבין האוכלוסייה הנוצרית במשאנה דולנה והסביבה בשנים שבין שתי מלחמות העולם היו מתוחים. היו שהאשימו את היהודים בתמיכה בתנועה הקומוניסטית, באחד הכפרים פרצו פרעות של ביריונים נגד יהודים ונורו יריות. הייתה גם עלילת דם נגד בעלת חנות יהודייה שהופרכה בבית משפט.

היהודים התרכזו בעיקר במרכז העיר. בין העסקים בבעלות יהודית היו המכולות של משפחות גינסבורג וזינס, חנות לממכר עורות ומוצרי סנדלרות בבעלותו של אברהם בוכסבאום. בככר העיר עמדו חנות סידקית וחנות ירקות ודגים ולידם סדנה וחנות של זגג.  ברחוב פילסודסקי היו ממוקמים מספר בתים וחנויות בבעלות יהודית, ביניהם המכולת של טרנר, האטליז של שמברגר, מספרה וכמה בתים בבעלותו של לווייסברגר. ברחוב קולברג פעלו מלון ומסעדה של משפחת לילנטאל. באולשני משפחת פויירשטיין חכרה מנסרה. בבעלותו של יצחק ווידאבסקי היה מפעל הסוכריות "שטולוורק". ברחוב אוגרודובה היה ממוקם בית החרושת לרהיטים בבעלותה של משפחת אדלר. בן אחר של משפחת אדלר היה בעל של משרד לעריכת דין.

בתקופה בין שתי מלחמות העולם התקיימה במקום פעילות פוליטית ותרבותית ערה. במקום פעלו סניפים של "הציונים הכללים", "ההתאחדות", "עקיבא". בשנת 1923 בתמיכתו של הארגון האצריקאי הג'וינט נוסד "ביקור חולים" לתמיכה בנזקקים, בשנת 1930 הוקמה במקום ספרייה עם אולם קריאה. ערב פרוץ מלחמת העולם השנייה היו במשאנה דולנה כ-800 יהודים.

 

תקופת השואה

ב-1 בספטמבר 1939 גרמניה הנאצית פלשה לפולין. ב-3 בספטמבר 1939 הגרמנים כבשו  את משאני דולנה. מיד עם כיבוש המקום הגרמנים החלו לחטוף יהודים לעבודות כפייה, ערכו חיפושים בבתי היהודים ושדדו מהם דברי ערך. ב-17 בספטמבר 1939 הצבא הסובייטי פלש לפולין וכבש את שטחי מזרח פולין עד למבואות לובלין. חלק מיהודי משאנה דולנה עבר אל שטחי הכיבוש הסובייטי, אך רובם חזרו לעיירה כעבור כמה ימים. בסתיו 1939 הגרמנים הטילו על היהודים את הגזרות הראשונות שכללו איסור לעסוק במסחר, בעיקר עם הפולנים, איסור לעזוב את המקום, וכמו כן איסור גישה לשוק וקניית מזון אצל כפריים. על היהודים הוטלה החובה לענוד על הזרוע סרט עם מגן דוד, כל היהודים בגילאים 60-12 חויבו לעבוד בעבודות כפייה. בינואר 1940 הוקם גטו לא מגודר. יותר מ-200 פליטים הגיעו מלודז' בחודשים מרץ-אפריל 1940. בסתיו 1940 הוקם במקום סניף של ה"יס.ס."- האירגון היהודי לעזרה הדדית שמרכזו בקרקוב. 267 אנשים קיבלו מהיס.ס. מזון ועוד 450 נזקקו לסעד.

לאחר הפלישה הגרמנית לברית המועצות ביוני 1941, רוכזו במשאנה דולנה היהודים מכפרי הסביבה ביניהם כ-50 איש מהכפרים סקז'ידלנה ( (Skrzydlnaופז'נושה (Przenosza). בסתיו 1941 נתמנה יודנראט ובראשו הועמד אריה שמיד. כמו כן הוקמה משטרה יהודית. בגטו היו מרוכזים כ-1,000 יהודים. מצב היהודים החמיר. היס.ס. טיפל ב-310 איש, העזרה ההדדית לא הספיקה. למרות האיסור של היציאה מהגטו שדינו גזר דין מוות, אנשים הסתכנו וחיפשו מזון בכפרי הסביבה. אלה שחיפשו מקלט מחוץ לגטו נתפסו ונרצחו במקום.

לראש המועצה המקומית נתמנה הפולקסדויטשה וולאדיסלב גלב, אדם אכזרי במיוחד. אחד "התחביבים" האהובים עליו היה לגזור ליהודים את הזקנים והפאות או לצוות עליהם להתאסף בשעה ארבע לפנות בוקר בככר העיר, לסדר אותם בשורות ולבצע תרגילי התעמלות מעייפים במשך שעות. בתום התרגילים, כשאנשים היו כבר באפיסת כוחות, הוא ציווה לשפך עליהם מים קרים.

בשנים 1942-1941 רוב היהודים עבדו במחצבות בסביבה, לאנשים אשר סבלו מתת-תזונה העבודה הייתה קשה ביותר. באפריל 1942 הגרמנים האשימו עשרים ושניים יהודים בחבלה והוציאו אותם להורג בשטח ה"אדלרובקה". עדים סיפרו שבשעת ההוצאה להורג מספר יהודים, ביניהם השוחט המקומי, התנפלו על הרוצחים. באביב או בתחילת קיץ 1942 נשלחו מספר צעירים למחנות העבודה בפוסטקוב (Pustków) ובפלשקוב (Płaszow). באותו הזמן הוטל על היהודים תשלום קנס גבוה.

ביולי 1942 הגרמנים ערכו רשימת שמית של יושבי הגטו, היהודים נצטוו להצטלם ונאמר להם שתמונותיהם ישמשו עבור מסמכי נסיעה לווהלין.באמצע אוגוסט 1942 הוטל קנס נוסף  על הקהילה שלא עלה בידי היהודים לשלמו. ב-16 באוגוסט 1942 הוצא צוו לפיו על יהודי משאנה דולנה, לימנובה, סטארי סונץ' ופיאסצ'נה לעבור לגטו בנובי סונץ'. ב-17 באוגוסט קיבלו יושבי הגטו מנות לחם וריבה לשבועיים. היהודים הצטוו להתייצב ב-19 באוגוסט 1942 בשעה חמש בבוקר עם מטען של 20 ק"ג במגרש ברובע אולשני, בשדה על יד הגיא שנקרא "פאנסקייה" (Pańskie). על פי הצוו כל היהודים יוצאו להורג במקום אם אחד מהם ייחסר. מפחד העונש כל היהודים התייצבו באולשני. מנובי סונץ' הגיעו במכוניות אנשי גסטאפו. לאחר מסירת המפתחות של הדירות ותשלום עבור "כרטיסי הנסיעה", נבחרו על ידי מפקד הגסטאפו האמאן כ-130-120 צעירים. את יתר היהודים, בקבוצות של 100 איש, הובילו אנשי הגסטאפו לבית חרושת לשימורים שבקרבת מקום. שם היו כבר מוכנים שני בורות שכרו יום קודם צעירים פולנים מאירגון "יונאקי" (Junaki) שהועסקו ב"באודינסט" – אירגון של עבודות כפייה. לפולנים נאמר שלא לספר לאף אחד על הבורות. היהודים שהובאו לקברים החפורים נצטוו להתפשט ונורו למוות מעל הבורות. נרצחו שם 881 יהודים. 80 איש מקבוצת הצעירים שנשארו בחיים הועברו למחנה עבודה בלימנובה שם עבדו בסלילת כבישים עד לחיסולו ב-5 בנובמבר 1942. באותו היום הם נורו בזאמייש'צ'יה (Zamieście) שליד טימבארק (Tymbark), כ-4 ק"מ מלימנובה. שאר האנשים מהקבוצע של הצעירים הושארו במשאנה דולנה והועסקו במחצבה. אם סיום העבודה שם הם הועברו לגטו טארנוב ומשם למחנה הריכוז בשבניה (Szebnie). מהם ניצלו מעטים בלבד. מן הרצח במשאנה דולנה ניצלו 10 יהודים שהושארו כדי לאסוף את הרכוש הנטוש של הנרצחים. כעבור ימים אחדים 9 איש מהקבוצה ברחו אך רובם נתפסו על ידי הפולנים ונרצחו. בין 14 באוקטובר 1940 ועד נובמבר 1942 פעל במשאנה דולנה מחנה עבודה של החברה "קליי, ייגר ושות'".  במחנה הזה היו כלואים כ-80 יהודים שעבדו בגריסת חצץ. בזמן האקציה במשאנה דולנה נרצחו כל הנשים שהיו במחנה הזה. בספטמבר 1942 ברחו מן המחנה 5 יהודים. בנובמבר 1942 הועברו כל 45 הגברים שנותרו עדיין במקום, אל נובי סונץ' ושם נורו למוות.

 

לאחר השואה

הצבא האדום שיחרר את משאנה דולנה ב-27 בינואר 1945. מעטים מיהודי משאנה דולנה ניצלו, אלה שברחו ונשארו בשטח הכיבוש הסובייטי חזרו לעיירה, אך נאלצו לנדוד הלאה מפאת המחתרת הפולנית האנטי קומוניסטית הרצחנית. בית הכנסת של המקום ובית הספר היהודי הסמוך אליו נהרסו על ידי הגרמנים מיד לאחר חיסול הגטו שהיה בקרבתו. היום במקומו עומד הביניין של בית הספר היסודי.  

בית העלמין נהרס בחלקו ונלקחו ממנו מצבות על ידי הגרמנים לבניים כבישים. הרס המקום המשיך גם לאחר 1945. נותרו בו כ-30 מצבות. ב-1989 בית העלמין הוכנס לרשימת המקומות לשימור. ביוזמתו של יוצא משאנה דולנה, לאו גאטטרר, השטח נוקה ושופץ, בית העלמין גודר בגדר ברזל עם שער ופשפש. היום שטחו של בית העלמין שייך לקהילה היהודית בקרקוב.

 בתום המלחמה הגיעו למשאנה דולנה כמה ניצולים והציבו בגיא ההריגה בפאנסקייה (Pańskie) אנדרטה עם כתובת בעברית בפולנית לזכר 881 היהודים שנרצחו שם. להלן הטקסט של הכתובת: "לזכר 881 היהודים הקדושים ממשאני דאלנא והסביבה הנרצחים על ידי הפושעים הנאצים ביום 19.8.1942, אשר זעקתם האחרונה היא הדממה של המקום. חולקים להם כבוד היהודים שניצלו מהפוגרום הפשיסטי. ינקום ד' נקמת דם שפוך. ת'נ'צ'ב'ה'". בתחתית האנדרטה הונחה אבן מירושלים, י'  אב תש"ס – 11.08.2000. במקום הירצחם של 22 יהודים באפריל 1942 ברחוב אוגרודובה הוקמה מצבת זכרון ביידיש.

לאחר המלחמה גופותיהם של 80 היהודים שנרצחו בזאמייש'צ'יה (Zamieście) שליד טימבארק (Tymbark) הוצאו מקבר האחים ונקברו בבית העלמין של קרקוב. ב-22 באפריל 2010 הקרן לשימור המורשת היהודית בשיתוף הקרן ""Forum Dialogu ערכו בפני תלמידי בתי הספר של משאנה דולנה סדרת הרצאות על ההיסטוריה היהודית של המקום, על השפה, המנהגים של האנשים שפעם התגוררו ביישוב שלהם. נערכו גם סיורים במקומות בעלי עבר יהודי. ב-19 באוגוסט 2019, ליד האנדרטה על קבר האחים של היהודים בגיא "פאנסקייה" נערך טקס בהשתתפות נכבדי ותלמידי בתי הספר של העיירה לציום השנה ה-77 לרצח יהודי משאנה דולנה.

Jordanów

Jordanow, a small town on the river Skawa, in Sucha County, Lesser Poland Voivodeship, Poland.

In the year 1564, Spytek Wawrzyniec Jordan received permission from the king of Poland, Sigismund II Augustus, to establish a city at the crossroads that led from Silesia to eastern Poland and from Krakow to Hungary ("the Salt Road"). The city was named after its founder. At the annual fairs that took place there, they traded in cattle.

After the first partition of Poland in 1772, Jordanow was included in the area that was annexed by the Austrian Empire as part of Western Galicia. In 1858, the Austrian Emperor Franz Joseph visited Jordanow. In 1884, a train station was built, and the town turned into a medical retreat and vacation destination. In 1930, there were 5,000 vacationers registered there.

On September 1, 1939, German and Slovokian troops crossed the southern border of Poland. As a result of powerful battles with the Polish forces in the area, the town suffered great destruction. In addition, battles for liberation of Poland between the Soviet Army and the Germans in January 1945 added to the destruction of 75% of the settlement.

The Jews in Jordanow

With the establishment of the city, Jewish merchants began to arrive only for the fair days, and after paying a special tax.

Until 1744, Jews were limited in business, and were specifically prohibited from dealing in salt. After the annexation of southern Poland to Austria in 1772, the business and settlement restrictions on the Jews were removed. Jews began to settle around Jordanow, especially the lands of Mąkacz, which today are within the boundaries of the town.

In Mąkacz, a cemetery was established which also served the Jews that lived in nearby settlements: Sucha, Makow, and Zawoja. In 1869, a governmental Jewish school was established, with one teacher who taught 20 students who were residents of the town and nearby villages.

In the second half of the 19th century, an organized community was established. The communities in Rabka and Makow Podhalanski became affiliated with Jordanow. In 1870, a synagogue and mikveh were built in the center of town.

A. Freundlich was appointed head of the community and served in that position until 1936. In 1887, Rabbi Israel Ber Naftali Hertz Schreiber was appointed as rabbi for Jordanow, Rabka and Makow, and he held that position until 1929. After his death, his son-in-law, Rabbi Elkana Ber Tzvi Yehuda Zoberman, inherited his position, and he served until September, 1939. After the German occupation, Rabbi Zoberman escaped to Lvov, which by then was under Soviet control, and from there he was exiled to Siberia in the Soviet Union.

At the end of the First World War (1914-1918), Jordanow was included in the territory of the Republic of Poland.

In the population census of 1921, 238 Jews were counted in the town, who constituted 16% of all the residents. Between the two World Wars, the Jews made a living from commerce, including cattle and textiles. In addition, there were Jewish craftsmen in the town. Other Jews were employed in rest homes and summer camps.

There were cultural and Zionistic activities. Most of the Orthodox Jews supported the Agudat Israel, but there were also active branches of the General Zionists and of the underground Communist Party. Participation in the activities of local branches of the organized youth, Akiva and Shomer Hatzair, was open to the convalescents and vacationers that were staying in town.

In 1921, a joint association of Jewish and Polish merchants was organized in Jordanow. Of the 35 members, the Zionists were 50%, representatives of the Polish City Club were 40%, and the Orthodox Jews were 10%. Joseph Kukla and Simon Friedhaber were appointed as managers of the group, with the assistance of Isaac Sternberg and Mieczysław Warzinski. In 1936, A. Freudlich, after he left the leadership of the community council, initiated the establishment of a charity fund (Gemilut Hasadim) to help those in need. The Jewish schools in Krakow and its surroundings regularly sent their students to summer resorts in Jordanow. Starting in 1932, students of the Tachkimoni secondary school for boys in Krakow went to summer resorts in Jordanow.

On the eve of the Second World War, there were 354 Jews in Jordanow.

 

The Holocaust

On September 1, 1939, Nazi Germany invaded Poland. Jordanow was captured by the Germans on September 3, 1939. Their tanks fired at the houses surrounding the city square and seeded destruction. The residents were prohibited from putting out the many fires. The town was left largely destroyed, and the German soldiers spread out among the houses, plundering whatever they put their hands on. At the same time, the number of Jews, including refugees that were concentrated in Jordanow, increased to approximately 400 individuals. Very quickly the Germans coerced the Jews into forced labor to clear out the ruins and the roadways. At the end of December 1939, the Jews who lost their homes and the refugees who continued to flow to the town concentrated together in the Chrobacze district, where they suffered from crowded conditions, cold, and starvation. The Jews were commanded to wear an armband with a Magen David. In February 1940, the Judenrat was appointed, with Erwin Kegal at its head. All Jews between the ages of 14 and 60 were put into forced labor. The Judenrat and the local community volunteered to help the needy refugees. On June 15, 1941, a branch of the Jewish Social Self- Help (JSS) was set up in Jordanow. The JSS was a Jewish organization of mutual help, whose center was in Krakow. With its assistance, a communal kitchen was set up. In February 1942, 170 people were helped by it.

In December 1941, after the United States joined the war against Germany, the Germans arrested members of the Feig family, who were subjects of the United States, and murdered them. Additional Jewish families were murdered: Ross, Gron, Sheingut, and Zolman.

After the German invasion of the Soviet Union on June 22,1941, the Germans murdered a number of Jewish families from the town. On August 20,1942, the Judenrat in Jordanow was forced to pay a ransom of 300,000 zloty. The Judenrat demanded that all Jews participate in the payment. There were people who sold the gold teeth in their mouths in order to make the payment. The ransom money was collected in time. On August 26,1942, the day members of the Judenrat handed over the ransom money to the authorities in Nowy Targ, the Germans raided the villages around Jordanow: Bystra, Naprawa, Osielec, and others. All of the Jews there were murdered.

On August 28 - 29, 1942, the German police and local Poles brought together all the Jews of Jordanow in the city square. 67 elderly people, mothers of infants, and children were led outside of the Strącze Quarter where they were murdered and buried in a common grave. The remainder, more than 400 Jews, were led on foot to Maków Podhalański, and from there they were sent to Belzec extermination camp. The Jews that succeeded in fleeing from the Aktie to the forest were captured after an extended pursuit, and they were murdered. An especially active participant in the pursuit after the hiding Jews was a Polish policeman named Wilczek. He was sentenced to death by the Polish underground Armia Krajowa. The fighters of the underground attempted to kill him. He was wounded and died from his wounds in a hospital in Rabka on October 30,1944.

After the Holocaust

Jordanow was freed by the Soviet Army on January 29, 1945. Because of the battles, the town was again struck hard. Approximately 72% of its structures were destroyed during the years 1939 to 1945.

A few Jews who hid succeeded in surviving with the help of Polish families. The family Jaskółka from the village of Bystra was awarded the title "Righteous Among the Nations" by Yad Vashem.

Those who were rescued could not return to Jordanow because of the anti-Communist activities of the Polish Underground in the area, who did not lay down their weapons until 1950.

Rabbi Elkana, who was exiled by the Soviets to Siberia, moved to Kazakhstan in 1941, where he took the position of dayan and teacher for Jewish refugees in Kyzyl Orda. He returned to Poland in 1946, and was appointed rabbi in the city of Walbrzych in Lower Silesia. In 1948, he immigrated to the United States.

The synagogue in the center of the city was destroyed by the Germans down to its foundation. Today, in its place, there is a residential home. The cemetery of Jordanow was also destroyed. Most of the marble matzevot were taken from the cemetery, under the command of SS Untersturmfuhrer Wilhelm Rosenbaum, and used to build the beautiful stairs of the Villa Traska in Rabka, in which resided the Schule der Sicherheitspolizei und SD im GG. - a school for the officers of the German security forces in the General Governorate. Other monuments were used to reinforce the banks of the river Gorzki Potok, in the town of Rabka.

In the cemetery, isolated monuments survived as well as parts of the concrete bases and remnants of monuments and remnants of the fence that surrounded the cemetery. After the war, the local population continued to plunder the matzevot.

In the area of the cemetery, there are mass graves of Jews killed locally or killed elsewhere and brought to the cemetery for burial in a common grave. After the war, remnants of Jews who had been buried after the murder at Stracze were brought to a common grave in the Jewish cemetery. The shallow grave was hastily dug in the middle of the main path. Even now it's possible to see among the blossoming wild flowers the depression that was left after covering the grave. In the cemetery there is another unmarked common grave of Jews. Maria Richlik, a witness to the murder, described what happened: "On a freezing day in January, two families of Jews were brought to the cemetery and commanded to undress. After a search, they found nothing on them, and so began to beat them cruelly, kicking them until they would die. The Starkenberg family lay on the ground. The father was still holding his small child in his hands...as long as someone was showing signs of life the Germans stomped on them with their shoes until they stopped moving…" In 1993, Stanislaw Targosz wrote about the murder in the Stracze Quarter in the newspaper Rolnicza Gazette: "they stood the Jews in a meadow, next to the grave on which they placed a board. The people, in turn, got up on the board, a shot was fired, and the victims fell to the bottom of the grave. Some of them were still alive, the bodies still trembling in pain, when a layer of lime was poured on them…" A marble monument with a memorial plaque to the Jews who were murdered was erected at the site of the mass murder that took place in the Strącze district in August 1942.

סטארי סונץ'

Stary Sącz

שמות נוספים: צאנז, ביידיש אלט צאנז בפולנית

עיירה בנפת נפת נובי סונץ' במחוז פולין קטן, פולין. סטארי סונץ' נמצאת בחבל גליציה מערבית.

המקום מתועד לראשונה בשנת 1226 בשם סונץ' (Sącz) או סאנדץ' (Sandecz). היישוב היה ממוקם על דרך המסחר שהובילה מהונגריה לקרקוב. לאחר הקמת העיר החדשה, נובי סונץ' (Nowy Sącz), בקרבתה המקום נקרא Stary Sącz (סונץ' הישנה). היישוב סונץ' והאזור כולו הוענקו על ידי הנסיך בולסלב "הביישן" לאישתו ההונגריה קונגה בשנת 1257. ב-1273 המקום קיבל מעמד של עיר. העיר התפתחה עם הקמת המנזר ע"ש "קלארה הקדושה" ב-1280. במנזר בילתה הנסיכה קונגה את 13 שנותיה האחרונות. המנזר היה גם מקום התבודדותה של המלכה יאדביגה אשת המלך וולאדיסלב יאגללו. גם האלמנות של העצולה הגבוהה הפולנית נהגו להתבודד בו. עם הזמן המנזר קיבל מעמד של קדושה מיוחדת והיה למקום לעליה לרגל של הקתולים רבים.

סטארי סונץ' סבלה רבות משרפות ושיטפונות שגרמו הנהרות הסובבים אותה. השרפה הגדולה של 1795 כמעט כילתה את העיר.

ב-1772, בחלוקתה הראשונה של פולין בין המעצמות השכנות, סטארי סונץ' נכללה באזור אשר סופח לאימפריה האוסטרית ואשר ידוע בשם גליציה מערבית.

בתום מלחמת העולם הראשונה בשנת 1918, סטארי סונץ' נכלל בגבולות פולין העצמאית.

 

היהודים בסטארי סונץ'

היהודים ראשונים הגיעו למקום בשנת 1469. לאחר שנת 1673 הגיעו לנובי סונץ' ולסטארי סונץ' יהודים מווישניץ' (Wiśnicz). היהודים התיישבו בווישניץ אשר הייתה בבעלותם של האצילים לבית לובומירסקי לאחר שגורשו מבוכניה (Bochnia) בשנת 1606. הקהילה היהודית בסטארי סונץ' התגבשה רק בסוף המאה ה-18. היהודים העדיפו את העסקים  בנובי סונץ' הסמוכה המפותחת יותר והעשירה יותר. עם ביטול ההגבלות על התיישבות  יהודים בערי גליציה בשנת 1860 התבססה במקום קהילה עצמאית. בשנת 1876 נבנה בית כנסת במקום. בסטארי סונץ' לא הוקם בית עלמין, את הנפטרים הובילו על עגלת של חברה קדישה לבית הקברות של נובי סונץ'. ב-1880 נמנו במקום 312 יהודים מתוך 3,790 תושבים (8.2%). היהודים עסקו בעיקר במסחר זעיר, ברוכלות בכפרי הסביבה, מקצתם היו  פונדקאים, ואחרים היו בעלי מלאכה, בעיקר בחייטים, קצבים ואופים.

בשנת 1898 עבר על האזור גל מהומות אנטישמיות של האיכרים אשר תחילתו בווייליצ'קה  Wieliczka בעקבות ההסתה של הכמרים אנדז'יי שפונדר ( Andrzej Szponder) וסטניסלב סטויאלובסקי (Stanisław Stojałowski). הפרעות לא פסחו על היישוב היהודי בסטארי סונץ'. במוצאי השבת ב-25 ביוני 1898 האיכרים המתפרעים הפכו את הדוכנים של הסוחרים היהודים בשוק, בזזו את חנויות היהודים, את מחסן המשקאות החריפים ורוקנו את מחסני התבואה שלהם והעלו אותם באש. כמן כן, התארגנה תנועה לאומנית נוצרית של האיכרים אשר יצאה בקריאה לא לקנות אצל היהודים. ב-1910 הוקמו קאופרטיבים פולניים למסחר שפגעו בפרנסת היהודים.

רבני המקום נמנו עם שושלת האדמו"רים של צאנז ממשפחת הלברשטם. הראשון בהם שהתמנה לתפקיד בשנת 1876 היה הרב אשר מאיר בן הרב יוסף זאב הלברשטם. ב-1885 כיהן ברבנות הרב יחיאל בנו של הרב משה הלברשטם. ב-1904 ירש את כסא הרבנות בנו בכורו, אחרון הרבנים, הרב אביגדור צבי שניספה בשואה.

עם הכנסת לימודי חובה באימפריה האוסטרית, נפתח בסטארי סונץ' בית ספר יסודי ובית ספר לסנדלרות. ב-1909 היו בשני בתי הספר 130 תלמידים, לא היה ביניהם אף ילד יהודי. ילדי היהודים למדו או ב"חדרים" או כ"בחורי גמרא" בבית מדרש. ב-1906 נבנה בית כנסת חדש במקום הישן שפורק ב-1902. ב-1910 נמנו במקום 666 יהודים (13%). החל מ-1915 התחיל להתארגן בסטארי סונץ' חוג של נוער ציוני "בני ציון", אך עד מהרה של עבר הסניף לנובי סונץ'.

בתום מלחמת העולם הראשונה בשנת 1918 וכינונה של הרפובליקה הפולנית העצמאית,  היישוב היהודי התרושש. רבים מבני הנוער עזבו את הישוב וחיפשו את עתידם במקומות אחרים בפולין או מעבר לים. במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 1921 נמנו בסטארי סונץ' 553 יהודים (12%). היהודים עסקו במסחר זעיר ובמלאכה, במיוחד בפרוונות, סנדלרות וחייטות. במקום פעל בית ספר לסנדלרות הידוע בכל גאליציה. ב-1927 נבחרו לראשונה למועצה האזורית של סטארי סונץ' שני יהודים ציונים. בראשית שנות ה-1930 הוקמה קופת גמ"ח אשר בשנת 1937 העניקה הלוואות ל-135 נזקקים.

בין שתי מלחמות העולם גברה בסטארי סונץ' הפעילות התרבותית והפוליטית. התארגנו סניפים של התנועות הציוניות "הציונים הכללים", "ארץ ישראל העובדת", הרביזיוניסטים, "בני עקיבא", "הנוער הציוני", ו"המזרחי". נפתחו קורסים ללימוד השפה העברית והוקמו מועדוני ספורט וחוג לדרמה. במקום פעל סניף מועדון הספורט "מכבי".

בשנת 1939 ישבו בסטארי סונץ' 553 יהודים.

 

תקופת השואה

ב-1 בספטמבר 1939 גרמניה פלשה לפולין. ב-6 בספטמבר הגרמנים כבשו את סטארי סונץ'. מיד התחילו חטיפות יהודים לעבודות כפייה לביצוע תיקון הכבישים ונזקי הקרבות. ב-17 בספטמבר 1939 ברית המועצות פלשה לפולין וכבשה את שטחי מזרח פולין עד לעיר לובלין. חלק מצעירי היהודים של סטארי סונץ' עברו לשטח הכיבוש הסובייטי, אך לאחר נסיגת הכוחות הסובייטים מאזור לובלין על פי הסכמי מולוטוב-ריבמטרופ בין ברה"מ לגרמניה הנאצית לחלוקת פולין, רוב הצעירים חזרו לסטארי סונץ' באזור הכיבוש הגרמני. עד מהרה הוטלו על היהודים הגבלות תנועה, היהודים נדרשו לשלם סכומים גדולים כדמי כופר, אולצו לשאת סרט עם מגן דוד על השרבול, ונאסרה עליהם לצאת מהבתים ללא אישור. בסוף 1939 הוקם יודנראט, שאחד מתפקידיו היה לספק אנשים לעבודות כפייה. צעירים יהודים נשלחו למחנות עבודה. בסוף סתיו 1940 היו בסטארי סונץ' 542 יהודים, ביניהם 148 עקורים מיישובים אחרים באזור.

 באפריל 1941 היודנראט בעזרת ה-י.ס.ס (האירגון לעזרה הדדית מקרקוב) אירגן עזרה לאוכלוסייה הנזקקת. בין פעילי הסניף של היס.ס. היו הנריק פינדר וד"ר ארנסט אדר. 85 יהודים קיבלו ארוחות חמות. כמו כן, היודנראט הושיט עזרה דחופה ל-250 יהודים. חלק מהיהודים עבדו במשקים החלאים באזור ובמפעלים החיוניים לגרמנים.

ב-13 בספטמבר 1941 נורו למוות עשרים נשים יהודיות. הגטו בסטארי סונץ' הוקם באביב 1942 ורוכזו בו כ-1,000 יהודים ביניהם גם יהודים מיישובים אחרים, ביניהם ריטרו (Rytro) -  בשנת 1935 התגוררו בריטרו 45 יהודים, פיבניצ'נה זדרוי (Piwniczna-Zdrój), שבה התגוררו 226 יהודים, וסטאדלה (Stadła), שבה חיו 3 יהודים.  תנאי המחיה והתברואה בגטו היו גרועים. ביולי 1942 מתו ממגפות הטיפוס ואדמת כמה עשרות יהודים. ב-17 באוגוסט 1942 הגרמנים ריכזו את יהודי הגטו ונאמר להם נאמר שהם עוברים לגטו בנובי סונץ'. 95 יהודים, החולים והזקנים, שלא יכלו לעבור ברגל את הדרך של 10 הק"מ לגטו בנובי סונץ' נרצחו ונקברו ביער פיאסקי ( Piaski) הסמוך. כל היתר הוכנסו לגטו בנובי סונץ'. קבוצה של 40 צעירים מסטארי סונץ' נשלחה למחנה עבודה והיהודים הנותרים, ביחד עם רוב יושבי הגטו בנובי סונץ', נשלחו בשלושה טרנספורטים למחנה ההשמדה בלז'ץ בין 25 ל-28 באוגוסט 1942.

ב-1944 הוקם סטארי סונץ' מחנה עבודה שבו הוחזקו שבויי מלחמה סובייטים ושני מחנות לעבודת כפייה שבו הוחזקו כמה אלפי אנשים.

 

לאחר השואה

בניין בית הכנסת לשעבר משמש כבית משרדים ובתי מלאכה.בבניין המקווה פועל היום בית דפוס.באתר קבר האחים ביער פיאסקי הוקמה אנדרטה מאבן גרנית ועליה לוח זיכרון בשפה הפולנית: "במקום הזה ב-17 באוגוסט שנת 1942 הנאצים הגרמנים ירו למוות ב-95 יהודים מהגטו של סטארי סונץ'." במוזיאון האזורי של סטארי סונץ' מוצגים מספר פריטי יודאיקה, ביניהם תלמוד בבלי בהוצאת ווילנא משנת 1930, תמונות ארכיון של תושבי סטארי סונץ'- איזידור אופוצ'ינסקי והלינה פינדר, "זגג יהודי" - ציור של הצייר אנטוני קרילוב ובובות בדמות יהודים מתפללים מעשה ידיהם של אמנים עממיים מקומיים.

 

ב-2010 הקרן "פורום דיאלוגו" (Forum Dialogu), שמטרתה ללמד את בני הנוער על העבר היהודי של פולין, ערכה מספר סדנאות עבור ילדי בתי ספר בסטארי סונץ' בהם הירצו על התושבים היהודים של העיירה שלהם, על ההיסטוריה, הדת והמנהגים שלהם. אחר כך התלמידים ביקרו במקומות ואתרים יהודיים בעבר, כגון בניין בית הכנסת והמקווה. כמו כן,  נערך טכס זכרון בהשתתפות תלמידי בתי הספר ליד האנדרטה לזכרם של 95 יהודים שנרצחו ביער פיאסקי. 

צ'ארני דונאייץ

Czarny Dunajec

כפר שהוא גם מועצה מקומית בנפת נובי טארג, במחוז פולין קטן, פולין. הכפר שוכן על הגבול בין פולין לסלובקיה. 

היישוב מתועד לראשונה בשנת 1234. במאה ה-16 המקום היה ידוע ככפר המלך בשם דונייאץ. החל מהמאה ה-18 צ'ארני דונאייץ שימשה כמרכז מסחרי ושוק לכפרים של הסביבה. הכפרים סחרו בעיקר בצאן, גבינות, צמר ומוצרי אריגה ביתית. המקום גם שימש כאחת התחנות להברחת סחורות ואנשים דרך הגבול הסלובקי. ב-1769, שלוש שנים לפני החלוקה הראשונה של מלכות פולין בין המעצמות השכנות, אזור נובי טארג וצ'רני דונאייץ סופח לאימפריה האוסטרית. ב-31 בינואר 1831 הוענק לכפר צ'ארני דונאייץ הזכות לקיים שוק שבועי וב-1846 ניתן האישור לקיום 13 ירידים שנתיים נוספים בתמורה להשתתפותם של תושבי הכפר בדיכוי מרד האיכרים נגד האוסטרים.

ב-1859 הייתה ביישוב שרפה גדולה, בעקבותיה נפגעה כלכלת המקום וגברה ההגירה של התושבים בחיפוש אחר הפרנסה בהונגריה ואף בארה"ב. בסוף המאה ה-19 החלו באזור בהפקת כבול, חול וחצץ מהנהר צ'ארני דונאייץ. החל מ-1880 בהיותו מרכז אדמיניסטראטיבי היישוב קיבל מעמד של עיר. ב-1904 נבנתה מסילת רכבת נובי טארג- סלובקיה- הונגריה עם תחנת רכבת בצ'ארני דונאייץ. 

לאחר תום מלחמת העולם הראשונה וכינונה של פולין העצמאית, צ'ארני דונאייץ נכללה בגבולות הרפובליקה הפולינית.

בין שתי מלחמות העולם הכפר התפתח גם כמקום תיירות ונופש. תחנת הרכבת של צ'ארני דונאייץ שימשה בין שתי מלחמות העולם כתחנת הגבול עם צ'כוסלובקיה. ב-1934, בשל המשבר הכלכלי ובעקבותיו הירידה בפעילות הכלכלית נשללו מצ'ארני דונאייץ זכויות העיר.

 

היהודים בצ'ארני דונאייץ

עד שנת 1796 חל איסור על התיישבותם של היהודים באזור נובי טארג וצ'ארני דונאייץ. החל משנה הזאת, על פי אישור מיוחד של השלטון האוסטרי החלו להתיישב במקום מספר משפחות של יהודים בעלי זיכיון למסחר בטבק, אלכוהול ומלח. היהודים פעלו גם כמוכסים וחוכרים בתי מרזח. ברשומות משנת 1847 מוזכרים בצ'ארני דונאייץ סוחרים בבקר, אלכוהול וקוני קרקעות היהודים: הרש ברייטקופף, יוסף יעקובסון, יצחק והירש קורנגוט, יצחק ומנדל אונגאר, סלומון גליקסמן. ב-1860 עם ביטול האיסור על התיישבות יהודים בגליציה חל גידול באוכלוסייה היהודית בצ'ארני דונאייץ. היהודים היו סוחרים זעירים, רוכלים, בעלי מלאכה והיו גם מי שעסקו בהברחות. ב-1,880 נמנו במקום 221 יהודים (8,9%). במחצית המאה ה-19 היו ברשות הקהילה שני בתי תפילה, מקווה ומספר חדרים. היהודים השתייכו לזרם האורתודוקסי והחסידי. הוקם בית העלמין בצ'ארני דונאייץ. הקהילה הייתה כפופה לקהילת נובי טארג.

בין רבני נובי טארג שכיהנו החל מסוף המאה ה-19 גם בצ'ארני דונאייץ ידועים  הרב מרדכי ב"ר חנינא הורביץ והרב יצחק ליפשיץ ב-1912. בין שתי מלחמות העולם ליהודי צ'ארני דונאייץ היה נציג בקהילת נובי טארג.

עם סיומו של השלטון האוסטרי בנובמבר 1918 פרעו הכפריים של הסביבה ביהודי צ'ארני דונאייץ. נעצרו 10 איש מהמתפרעים. האוכלוסייה הנוצרית נמנעה מלסחור עם היהודים.

במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 1921 נמנו בצ'ארני דונאייץ 341 יהודים (14,2%). ב-1927 הקהילה גדלה ל-400 יהודים וב-1939 התגוררו בצ'ארני דונאייץ 405 יהודים (14%). למרות מספרם הקטן יחסית ההשפעה של היהודים על חיי הכפר הייתה ניכרת.

ב-1920 היהודים ברנארד שוורצבראנד ויעקב סטילר עסקו בעריכת דין בנובי טארג. בשנות ה-1930 היו בצ'ארני דונאייץ 3 עורכי דין יהודים: לייזר לאמנסדורף, שמעון פאצאנובר, וקופל שלזינגר. במקום היו 6 בעלי מפעלי תעשייה -שמעון ברונדר, יהודה שבתאי בליץ, יצחק אהרון פייט, אמיל פאוסט, אדולף הורביץ, יוסף הירש שפיץ, 4 שוחטים - חיים סלומון באכנר, משה יוסף פלאנק, יצחק גולדמן, פנחס ווייס, 7 אופים - מרדכי פאואר, סלומון גוטפראוד, וויגדור (וויקטור) הורביץ, יצחק יונס, סלומון יונס, גאורג יונס והמתלמד ברנרד לורברפלד, 5 סנדלרים - יוסף הורביץ, הרש לנגר, משה למולר, לייבוש טרפר, חיים טרפר, ו-3 חייטים -חיים קליינזאהלר, אדולף סטילר, גדליה ווייסמן. בנוסף היו 5 יהודים שעסקו בשיווק משקאות חריפים - יצחק קלוגר, פנחס כהן, יצחק קראוס, אדולף הורביץ והמסעדן יעקב לנדר. המנסרה של המקום שהעסיקה כ-200 פועלים הייתה בבעלותו של לנדאו מקרקוב. לרוב היהודים השקיעו בנדל"ן כגון מאפיות, בתי מרזח, מסעדות, חנויות, ופחות בקניית קרקעות לחקלאות.

הילדים היהודים למדו בשני בתי ספר יסודיים, אחד לבנים ואחד לבנות. ילדי העשירים למדו בנובי טארג או בקרקוב.

בין שתי מלחמות העולם הייתה ביישוב פעילות תרבותית וציונית ערה. ב-1929 הוקם בית ספר מרשת "תרבות". הוקמו החברות "לינת צדק" ו"ביקור חולים", הוקמה קופת גמ"ח אשר בשנת 1929 נתנה 45 הלוואות לנזקקים. במקום פעלו סניפים של "הציונים הכלליי, "עקיבא", "השומר הצעיר","החלוץ", אגודת החינוך "תרבות", מועדון "התחייה" שכלל ספרייה ואולם קריאה בהנהלת אנדה צייסלר מדמביצה. ב-1930 ליד מועדון "התחייה" נפתח "גן ילדים עברי". היו גם שני מועדוני ספורט יהודים - "מכבי" ו"הגיבור".

היחסים עם האוכלוסייה הנוצרית היו מתוחים ומידי פעם היו התנקשויות, אך ללא שפיכות דמים. ליהודים היו שמונה נציגים במועצה העירונית. ליד האוכלוסייה היהודית התגוררו ביישוב גם בני רומה אך להם היו מעט מאוד זכויות.

תקופת השואה

ב-1 בספטמבר 1939 גרמניה פלשה לפולין. צ'ארני דונאייץ נכבשה ב-3 בספטמבר. ב-8 בספטמבר 1939 הגרמנים הוציאו להורג שני תושבי המקום ושרפו 36 בתים.

הגרמנים התחילו מיד להתעלל באוכלוסייה היהודית, כולל חטיפות לעבודות כפייה. אמנם לא הוקם גטו במקום, אך מינואר 1940 על יהודים נאסר להחזיק רכוש והוגבלה האפשרות לצאת מהיישוב. נאסר השימוש בשפה העברית והייתה חובה על היהודים לעבוד בעבודות כפייה. במשך החודשים מאי-יוני 1941 חלק מהיהודים הועברו בקבוצות קטנות לגטו בנובי טארג. משם כולם נשלחו ביחד עם יושבי גטו נובי טארג למחנה ההשמדה בלז'ץ.

ב-20 במאי 1942 הגרמנים הרגו את יוסף להרר ואת בתו. יחד איתם הרגו את הפולני קארול חרצה (Karol Chraca) אשר סיפק להם מזון במיסתור. קברו את כולם בקבר אחים בבית העלמין המקומי.

ביולי 1942 הגרמנים רצחו בביתם את משפחת פאצאנר ובאוגוסט אותה שנה רצחו בצ'ארני דונאייץ והסביבה מעל עשרה יהודים חולים, ביניהם את גרשון יונס ואישתו, את נתן נאוגבירץ ואישתו, את הנריק באליצר עם אישתו, בתו ואביו ואת נינה קראוס.

בספטמבר 1942 הוקם בצ'ארני דונאייץ מחנה לעבודות כפייה. היהודים רוכזו בצמוד לתחנת הרכבת, ליד הדרך לנובי טארג. הובאו לשם גם כ-90 יהודים מיורדנוב (Jordanów), אוחוטניצה (Ochotnica), לימנובה (Limanowa), משנה דולנה (Mszana Dolna), שצ'אבניצה (Szczawnica), וגם כ-100 איש מאלה שעוד נותרו בנובי טארג. כולם עבדו במנסרות "הומאג" Homag בניית סככות מסתור למטוסים. במאי 1943 מחנה העבודה נסגר והאסירים שולחו למחנה ההשמדה בלז'ץ.

 

לאחר השואה

חמישה יהודים בלב מבין תושבי צ'ארני שונאייץ שרדו את השואה. היהודים לא חזרו לצ'ארני דונאייץ.

בית הכנסת חולל על ידי הגרמנים. לאחר המלחמה, במקום הגומחה של ארון הקודש הפולנים פתחו פתח לדלתות והמקום שימש כמחסן תבואות.

בית העלמין שימש את הגרמנים כמקום להוצאות להורג ולקבורת הקורבנות בקברי אחים. חלק מהמצבות נלקחו על ידי הגרמנים כחומר לחיזוק כבישים. לאחר המלחמה האוכלוסייה המקומית המשיכה בשוד המצבות, לעיתים ללא צורך ממשי בהן. נותרה על מקומה רק מצבה אחת עם כיתוב עברי ופה ושם הבסיסים מבטון על הקברים ללא המצבות. השטח כוסה בצמחיית פרא.

אחד מתושבי המקום שלח מכתב תלונה למכון ההיסטורי היהוד בוורשה ובו הוא כותב: "בצער אני רואה את ההרס המכוון של המצבות ואת המקום שבו רועות הפרות ומכוסה בערמות אשפה". דאריוש פופיילה (Dariusz Popiela), פולני, מדליסט אולימפי ועולמי בחתירת קייאקים, הקים במסגרת הקרן "פורום לדו-שיח" (Forum For Dialogue -- Forum Dialogu), עמותה בשם "אנשים, לא מיספרים" שמטרתה להנציח ולתת שמות להיהודים שנרצחו בשואה. עד היום שוקם בעזרת האמותה בית הקברות בגריבוב (Gribów) והונצחו השמות של הנרצחים על האנדרטאות בכפרים קרושצינקו נד דונאיצם (Krościenko nad Dunajcem) וגריבוב (Gribów).

דאריוש פופיילה ביקש מנכבדי צ'ארני דונאייץ, כולל הכומר המקומי, להירתם למאמץ שכנוע של תושבי האזור בצורך להחזיר לבית העלמין לפחות חלק מהמצבות הנמצאות אצל התושבים ובמשקים החקלאים.

בעבר היו בבית העלמין מאות מצבות, נמצאו רק בודדות מהן. אחת המצבות עם הציפורים שימשה כמרזב, השנייה עם המנורה הייתה בתוך קיר של רפת. הן היו במצב נורא כשנמצאו. האומנית רגינה מקושצ'יילסק חידשה את המצבות. היום הן נקיות, הכיתוב קריא ועל חלק מהמצבות האותיות נצבעו בצבע זהב. בשטח בית העלמין הוצב מגן דוד, מעשה אומן של הנפח המקומי, מיכאל שאפלרסקי (Michal Szaflarski), מתנדבים ותלמידי בית הספר בהנהלת המורה מוניקה צ'אפלה (Monika Czapla) אספו את ערימות האשפה מבית העלמין, חשפו את שרידי הקברים, הציבו שלטים עם שמות, סידרו שבילים ודאגו לניקיונו של בית העלמין.

דאריוש פופיילה גייס את הקרן של משפחת ניסנבאום ובשנת 2020 הקרן עזרה במימון גידורו של בית העלמין והקמת שער הכניסה. שיפוץ בית העלמין ערך 10 חודשים. מול השער הוקמה אנדרטה, אך על הלוח עליה לא הספיק לרישום כל שמות הנרצחים של בני המקום והסביבה. הוצבו שני לוחות נוספים משני הצדדים. חקוקים על האנדרטה שמותיהם של 494 אנשים.

לימנובה

Limanowa

ביידיש: לימענעוו, בגרמנית: Hildman, Ilmann

עיירה ובירת הנפה לימנובה במחוז פולין קטן, פולין.

המקום מוזכר לראשונה בשנת 1476 בשמו הגרמני Ilman. בשנת 1565 המלך  הפולני זיגמונד השני אוגוסט העניק לתושבי המקום זכויות של עיר ופטור מתשלום מיסים למשך שלושים שנים. בראשית היה זה יישוב חקלאי שהתפתח עם הזמן בזכות הירידים והשווקים שנערכו במקוםו ומאוחר יותר גם בעקבות הקמתם של בתי מלאכה לביגוד, מזון, עיבוד מתכות ועץ. תושבי העיירה עסקו גם בסחר במשקאות חריפים ובירה עם הונגריה, שאז גבלה עם איזור זה של פולין. רק ב-1680 העיר מתועדת בשמה הפולני לימנובה.

העיר נחרבה בזמן הפלישה השבדית לממלכת פולין בין השנים 1660-1655. המקום התאושש מהחורבן רק לאחר שסופח לאימפריה האוסטרית ב-1772, בעקבות בחלוקת  פולין הראשונה בין המעצמות השכנות. הקיסר האוסטרי לאופולד השני העניק למקום זכויות יתר כדי במטרה לחזק את כלכלת העיר. בניית מסילת הרכבת ב-1884 לרוחבה של גליציה המערבית והקמת תחנת רכבת בלימנובה בשנת 1885 תרמו להתפתחותה. בשנת 1886 לימנובה הפכה למרכז מינהלי ובירת נפה. לימנובה הייתה ידועה גם בסחר בסוסים.  בשנת 1900 כל סוס רביעי בגליציה נקנה או נמכר בשוק שלה. בשנת 1907 בסמוך לעיר, בסובליני (Sowliny), חברה צרפתית בנתה בתי זיקוק לנפט, בעיר הוקם מפעל מודרני לייצור בירה והמנסרה הורחבה.

בדצמבר 1914, בזמן במלחמת העולם הראשונה (1918-1914), צבאות אוסטריה וגרמניה הדפו בקרבת לימנובה התקפה של צבא רוסיה. בעקבות הקרבות חלק גדול מהיישוב נשרף או נהרס בהפגזות. לאחר תום מלחמת העולם לימנובה נכללה בשטחה של פולין. יחד עם המעבר לעצמאות לימנובה איבדה את השווקים האוסטרים וכלכלת היישוב נפגעה. סגירת בית הזיקוק ב-1933 והמשבר הכלכלי גרמו לעליית המתחים והרעת היחסים בין האוכלוסיות השונות בעיר.

 

היהודים בלימנובה

היהודים מוזכרים לראשונה בלימנובה בשנת 1640, במסמך המבטל זכיונו של ישראל ישראלוביץ למכור אלכוהול. הוא הואשם שהכריח את תושבי המקום לקנות בירה באיכות ירודה ומכר יי"ש במחירים מופקעים. לא ידוע האם סולק מהעיר. לפי הרשומים במחצית השנייה של המאה ה-18, בלימנובה התגורר היהודי מיכאל רוז'נסקי אשר התנצר, כמוהו התנצרה ב-1761 צעירה יהודיה. היהודים תרמו לפיתוחה של העיר, במיוחד בסוף המאה ה-18, כאשר התמחו בייצור ושיווק אלכוהול ובירה, מוצרים שהיו מבוקשים גם בהונגריה. ב-1769 התגוררה בלימנובה משפחה יהודית אשר חכרה מבשלת בירה. ההעדפה במסירת החכירה של ייצור הבירה לידי היהודים מצד האצילים בעלי המקום גרמה למתחים וסכסוכים עם הבורגנות המקומית. ב-1789 התלוננו תושבי המקום הנוצרים בפני השלטונות האוסטרים על בני האצולה המקומית ודרשו לקחת מהיהודים את רשות החכירה, אולם  דרישתם נדחתה. פרט לחכירה היהודים עסקו בשחיטה, בעיבוד עורות, בפרוונות ובאפיית לחם. לפי הרשומות בראשית שלטון האוסטרים בגליציה, בלימנובה רק יהודי אחד עסק בחקלאות.

בראשית המאה ה-19 התיישבו בלימנובה שתי משפחות יהודים חשובות: גולדפינגר ובלאוגרונד. במחצית המאה ה-19 ישבו במקום 30 משפחות יהודים. ב-1850 הוקם במקום בית כנסת. אגודת חברת קדישא קנתה חלקה מחוץ ליישוב בקרבת הכפר סוליבני (Sowliny) והקימה עליה את בית העלמין. היהודים התפרנסו ממסחר בשווקים הכפריים בתבואות, בסיד שהובא מפודגוז'ה (Podgórze) ליד קרקוב, בעורות ובנוצות.שלושה יהודים חכרו בתי מרזח, היו גם חייט אחד, ייצרן סבון, מוכס, מוכר טבק ועגלון. מסילת הרכבת תרמה, כמו בכל מקום, להתאוששות כלכלית ולהזדמנויות פרנסה חדשות ואיתן גם לגידול באוכלוסיות העירוניות והיהודיות. השקעות במפעלים חדשים בלימנובה במאות ה-19 וה-20 הגדילו את מספר מקומות העבודה. בשנת 1880 בעיר התגוררו כ-880 יהודים. גידול אוכלוסיית היהודים הביא לעצמאות הקהילה ולהתנתקות מקהילת וישניץ' (Wisznicz) בסוף המאה ה-19. כרבע מיהודי לימנובה היו חסידי הצדיקים מנובי סונץ'. יתר היהודים גם הם היו אדוקים באמונתם. בקהילת לימנובה היו שלושה רבנים, שלושה בתי תפילה ומספר חדרים. חלק מילדי היהודים למדו בבית הספר הציבורי הפולני. בחברה החסידית בלט אחוז גבוה של נשים יהודיות שפירנסו את המשפחה וניהלו את כלכלת הבית בזמן שהגברים היו עסוקים בלימוד התורה. הדסה ביטרמן ניהלה דוכן בדים, אסתר הינדה ברגר עסקה בסחר קמעונאי, לברגלאס ולאסתר בירנבאום היו דוכני כולבו, טאובה שיינקורן בירקנפלד סחרה בירקות ופירות וחיה בירנבאום סחרה בעורות ומוצרי סנדלרות.

היחסים עם האוכלוסיה הנוצרית בתחילה היו תקינים, אך עם הזמן, עקב החרפת התחרות הכלכלית והתגברות התעמולה האנטישמית, המצב התדרדר. המהומות והפרעות של 1898ביהודי 1898 גליציה לא פסחו על לימנובה. בכפרים סביב לימנובה הפורעים הרסו כמה בתי מרזח של יהודים. יהודי העיר ניצלו בזכות נוכחות הצבא בעיר. לאחר כינונה של הרפובליקה הפולנית העצמאית וכניסת הלגיון הפולני ללימנובה בנובמבר 1918 התחדשו הפרעות ביהודים, אך השלטון החדש השתלט על המצב.

במפקד האוכלוסין של 1921 נמנו בלימנובה 905 יהודים מתוך 2,143 כלל האוכלוסייה  (42.2%). האוכלוסייה היהודית גדלה ב-1924 ל-1,099 איש (51.1%), אך ב-1931 נמנו במקום 1,002 יהודים (45.2%). ליהודים הייתה נציגות במועצת העיר: דר' יאן האמרשלאג נבחר לראשות העיר וייצג אותה במועצת המחוז. . בתקופה שבין שתי מלחמות העולם התקיימה בלימנובה פעילות תרבותית, פוליטית וציונית ערה. נוסדה אגודה של סוחרים יהודים, במקום פעלו כמה אגודות יהודיות לעזרה סוציאלית, הייתה קופת גמ"ח, קופה עממית, וארגון הג'וינט האמריקאי עזר בהקמת מטבח להזנת ילדים. במקום פעלו בית ספר עברי של רשת "תרבות", בית ספר יהודי ללימודי דת. בעיירה הוקמו תנועות נוער ציוניות וסניף של אירגון הנשים "ויצ"ו" שהפעיל חוג דרמה.

עם העמקת המשבר הכלכלי בשנות ה-1930, מצב היהודים החמיר. הלאומנים הפולנים קראו לחרם על המסחר עם היהודים. השטפון הגדול בשנת 1935 גרם לנזקים גדולים בעיר.

 

תקופת השואה

 ב-1 בספטמבר 1939 גרמניה הנאצית פולשה לפולין. הגרמנים כבשו את לימנובה ב-6 בספטמבר 1939. מיד החלו בחטיפות של יהודים לעבודות כפייה. ב-11 בספטמבר הגרמנים רצחו מחוץ לעיירה במורדרקה (Mordarka), ליד הדרך לנובי סונץ', 12 יהודים אמידים שהואשמו בתרומה לקרן ההגנה הלאומית הפולנית. על יהודי לימנובה הוטלו גזרות כלכליות והגבלות: על היהודים נאסר לעסוק במסחר, על ילדי היהודים נאסר ללכת לבתי הספר והיהודים חויבו לענוד על הזרוע סרט עם מגן דוד..

במרס 1940 הגיעו לעיירה כ-700 פליטים מלודז'. חלקם שוכנו בכפרי הסביבה, כ-400 מהם הועברו הלאה, לנובי סונץ'. מצב היהודים הלך והחמיר. הסניף של ה"יס.ס" - האגודה היהודים לעזרה הדדית בנובי סאנץ' (Nowy Sącz) סייע בטיפול בפליטים.

ב-1941 בכפר הסמוך סטארה וויאש (Stara Wieś) נורו למוות 167 יהודים זקנים וחולים. במאי אותה שנה, הז'נדרם באומן (Bauman), כנקמה על בריחת שני יהודים מקבוצה שהובילו אותה לעבודה שני שומרי אס.אס, רצח בבית העלמין 12 יהודים. ביולי 1941 נרצחו 70 יהודים נוספים ליד החומה ברחוב קילינסקי (Kiliński). בקייץ 1941 רוכזו כ-1,500 יהודים ברובע קמיינייץ (Kamieniec) בגטו פתוח.

בסוף שנת 1940 היו בלימנובה 895 יהודים, מהם 95 פליטים. הסניף של ה"יס.ס." בקרקוב סייע לכ-300 מהם. ביוני 1941 הוקם בלימנובה הסניף המקומי של ה"יס.ס.". בקיץ 1941 ציוו הגרמנים לרכז כ-600 מיהודי הסביבה בלימנובה ובמשאנה דולנה. התמנה יודנרט של 12 חברים בראשותו של סולו שניצר (Solo Schnitzer). בתחילת 1942 הוקם גטו מעבר עבור יהודי לימנובה והכפרים סביב. ב-20 באפריל 1942 נרצח סולו שניצר כעונש על סירובו למסור לגרמנים רשימות של יהודים זקנים וחולים, עִמו נרצחו כל חברי היודנרט. ב-4 ביוני 1942 הפך הרובע לגטו סגור. ביולי 1942 נרצחו בלימנובה כ-30 יהודים. בתחילת אוגוסט 1942 הוטל על יהודי לימנובה לשלם כנס גבוה.

ב-16 באוגוסט 1942 פורסם צוו גירוש לנובי סונץ' של יהודי הגטאות בנפה ובכללם יהודי לימנובה. אנשי הגסטאפו שבאו מנובי סונץ' והשוטרים המקומיים ריכזו את יהודי הגטו בככר העיר, אחרי סלקציה שעשו אנשי הגסטאפו מנובי סונץ' נרצחו 380 זקנים וחולים בדרך לסטארה וייש' (Stara Wieś), מקום שכבר בוצעו בו הוצאות להורג בעבר. הגרמנים העבירו 200 איש למחנה עבודה בסןבליני (Sowliny) ואת יתר היהודים, כ-750 איש, הריצו ברגל לנובי סונץ' במרחק 26 ק"מ, כאשר בדרך ירו בכל מי שכשלו או שלא היו מסוגלים לרוץ. כעבור מספר  ימים יהודי לימנובה שולחו מנובי סונץ' למחנה ההשמדה בלז'ץ. הגטו בלימנובה חוסל ב-18 באוגוסט 1942. היהודים ממחנה העבודה בסובליני (Sowliny) הועסקו בסלילת כבישים בבסיס הצבא. אחר כך גם הם הוצאו להורג ליד טימבארק (Tymbark) הסמוכה.

 

לאחר השואה

לימנובה שוחררה ב-19 בינואר 1945. בין המשחררים היה בנו של סוחר הסובין מרחוב קרקובסקה בלימנובה שפיקד על פלוגה בצבא האדום. הוא היה בין מעט השורדים שעברו ב-1939 לשטח הכיבוש הסובייטי. תוך זמן קצר הוא עזב את פולין. מעטים מיהודי לימנובה שרדו במחנות עבודה או במסתור. הקהילה לא התחדשה.

הגרמנים הרסו את בית הכנסת והחדר שהתקיים על ידו. 75% מהמצבות בבית העלמין נשדדו על ידי הגרמנים כחומר בניין. אחדות מהן שימשו כספסלים בככר העיר. גם לאחר 1945 נמשך הרס המצבות, נשארו רק 20 מצבות וכמה עשרות בסיסי קברים מתוך כ-100. בשנות ה-1970 וה-1980 שטח בית העלמין סודר וגודר. הוקמו שער ופישפש. בשנות ה-1990 הוקמו בבית העלמין שתי אנדרטאות על קברי האחים של הנרצחים על ידי הנאצים.

במוזיאון האזורי מוצגים צילומים המתארים את חיי הקהילה היהודית שהתקיימה פעם בלימנובה. הקרן "Forum Dialogu" אירגנה עבור תלמידי בתי הספר בעיירה הרצאות על ההיסטוריה היהודית ועל תולדות היהודים שהתגוררו בעבר בעיירה וגם סיורים מודרכים  באתרים היהודיים. טכסי זיכרון נערכים באתרים שבהם נרצחו היהודים.

Galicia

Galicia

Yiddish: גאַליציע (Galitsye); Polish: Galicja ; German: Galizien; Ukranian: Галичина (Halychyna); Russian: Galitsiya; Hungarian: Gácsország; Romanian: Galiţia; Czech, Slovak: Halič

Geographically part of east Europe, in S.E. Poland and N.W. Ukraine. Galician roots derive from the name of the Ukrainian town Halicz (in Ukranian: Halych), in the Middle Ages part of the Kyivan Rus.
 

21st Century

The special life and culture of the Galician shtetl of the olden days remain with us in the history, in the shtetls of the past, and in Hassidic stories and books.

The Galicia Jewish Museum in Kazimierz established in 2004 commemorates the victims of the Holocaust and holds on to Jewish Galician culture.

 

History

Galicia had great significance in the history of the Jewish European Diaspora. The Jews of Galicia formed a bond between the Jews of East and West Europe.

The Kingdom of Galicia was first established on land given to the Habsburg Empire with the first partition of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth of 1772. Six towns amongst them Brody, Belz and Rogatin were close to entirely Jewish populated. Previous to the 1772 partition, Galicia was the Little Poland. The Galician Kingdom as such lasted until the early 20th century. The first chief rabbi (Oberlandesrabbiner) of Galicia was Aryeh Leib Bernstein with seat in Lemberg. After 1772 further lands were acquired to the Kingdom, and extended Galicia to the north and north west. The small Republic of Krakow joined the Kingdom in 1846 with the territory encompassing over an area of 20,000 square miles and this remained as such until the end of the Kingdom (1918). The 1860’s saw efforts toward democratic changes ensued by a period of an autonomous Galicia from 167-1918. Galicia was covered in the Emperor Joseph II (Josef Benedikt Anton Michel Adam), Holy Roman Emperor, statutes for the betterment of Jewish life. Amongst others, Jews were to take on German family names and governmental schools were set for the education of Jews. 

Galicia had historically during its existence under the Habsburg regime, been the land with one of the highest percentages of Jewish populations worldwide. At the time of the region's annexation to the Habsburg Empire in 1772, the Jewish population numbered 224,980 (9.6% of total), in 1857 448’971 (9.7%) and 871,895 (10.9%) in 1910. Distinguishing them from the rest of the Habsburg population was their Orthodox Judaism with distinctive mannerism, clothes and language. Their communities established commercial and trading platforms. In the towns, also smaller ones, Jews occupied retailing and craftsmanship work for household and garment ware such as textile, tailoring, hatters and furriers. Foreign trade was largely Jewish business with Russia, Turkey and Germany.

The last decades of the 18th century already saw the beginnings of the Haskalah with flourishing social and cultural Jewish life in those days and early 19th centuyr with its golden days from 1815-mid 19th century in Galicia with its center in Brody. Euducation and literature blooming in the 19th century, formed Galicia into a center for Judaism in creation and intellect while traditional Jewish learning was nevertheless not neglected in that century. Those days did see struggles between Hassidim and Mitnaggedim, Hassidim and Haskalah. Prominent figures came from the Belz dynasty, Zanz and Ruzhin. In the large cities Reform synagogues were sacred, the Lvov leadership placed a Reform Rabbi Abraham Kohn in the late 1830s who however faced severe adversity in 1848. There were Jewish schools with German as language of instruction and the 1830 and 1840s saw growth and increased influence of Maskilim. This twin striving for Haskalah and assimilation towards German culture took a change in the 60s and 70s, with the reigns shifting to more university oriented representatives alongside a trend accompanied by the strongly Orthodox to an absorption to more local Polish culture and policy. In the revolutionary parliament of 1848 sat a few Jews from Galicia. At the time some adverse policies were revoked by the government. In parallel there was an amelioration in the economic situation of Jews which also saw a heightened shift of Jews into the farming sector including the development of experimental Jewish farms.

From the late 1860s a separation occurred of the Aggudat Ahimm, the Polish assimilationists, from the German assimilationists. The former adherents of Orthodoxy brought together a rabbinical conference in Lvov which ruled that community voting was dependent upon adherence of members to the Shulhan Arukh. In that century there were several weekly and monthly periodicals published in Galicia in Hebrew and Yiddish. There occurred also from the 1860-1880s an anti-assimilationist tendency and new directions in Haskalah. This was greatly influenced by Peretz Smolenskin a Zionist and Hebrew writer. He was concerned with the Halaskah movement, an early and strong proponent of Jewish nation-state building and rejectionist of Judaism’s westernization. A first society for Palestine settlement was established in 1875 in Przemysl, south-east Poland and in the 1880s the Hovevei Zion gained ground. This was accompanied by increasing antisemitism on Polish territory with the assimilationist Aguddat Ahim halting publication in 1884 of written materials and going insofar as declaring the only Jewish future as emigration of Palestine or conversion to Christianity. Early Zionist organizations were established and publications were issued in the region of Lvov. In the early 1890s economic boycotts were imposed on Jews from exclusion on trade in agricultural goods and merchandize, alcohol and more. The Jewish population in Galicia faced poverty. Nevertheless, Zionist movements continued their efforts.

Alongside, the early 20th century saw the development of neo-romantic Yiddish literature mostly coming from the area of Lvov and influenced by a corresponding phenomenon in Vienna. One prominent writer was Shmuel Yosef Agnon (1888-1970) who would come to monument the Galician shtetls. Those days also saw the translation into the Yiddish of foreign literature. Such representatives were the Oscar Wilde, of which one of his most famous works are the humorous ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’. World War I saw many Galician Jews flee to Hungary, Bohemia and Vienna, and in particular educated Galician Jews find refuge in Vienna. Those remaining suffered greatly under the Russians entry into Galicia. Ensuing in 1918 with the Polish-Ukranian war the unfortunate situation of minorities on Polish land increasingly led to the crumbling of the once Jewish-inspired Kingdom of Galicia. The Polish Republic took over the Galician land. Notwithstanding, deference to German and Polish culture and to the Polish nation, Hassidism and Zionist striving continued to sprout in the years until 1939, inklings of the Galician world remained with Hassidic communities as in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and New York. 

Galicia had historically during its existence under the Habsburg regime, been the land with one of the highest percentages of Jewish populations worldwide. Distinguishing them from the rest of the population were their Orthodox Judaism with distinctive mannerism, clothes and language. Their communities established commercial and trading platforms. With the mid-19th century nevertheless this population saw beginnings of wearing out. Those were the days of the onset of the Haskalah (Jewish enlightenment) with family life adhering to Orthodox Judaism while modernizing outwardly and seeing an improved standing in society and economy and reduced isolation. The trend was of assimilation of Galician Jews to Germans and then to Poles. This trend of the last decades of the 19th century amongst Galician Jews went in parallel to the Marxist striving for a workers’ revolution.

Flag hoisting in a summer samp in Novy Targ, the Carpathian Mountains, Poland, 1939
Flag hoisting in a summer camp of scouts from Krakow,
Novy Targ, the Carpathian Mountains, Poland, 1939
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
courtesy of Nahum Manor, Israel)