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SHRAGER Origin of surname

SHRAGER

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from a Jewish value or religious concepts. It is also derived from an Aramaic personal name or title. The Jewish surname Shrager, in which the German/Yiddish suffix "-er" means "of/from" and can stand for "son of", is derived from the male personal name Shraga, a Hebrew name deriving from the Aramaic for "fire/light". It is associated with wisdom and sharpness of mind. In talmudic times, people credited with bringing light or intellectual clarity to their subject were given the Hebrew name Meir ("one who enlightens"), Yair ("he will bring light") or the Aramaic forms, Nehorai, Nahor, Shraga. As personal names, Uri and Schraga often appeared in combination as an apotropaism, given in order to ward off danger and evil. An infant orphaned of both parents would be given the secular name Vives (an equivalent of Hayyim, that is "life"), and also the Hebrew Uri Shraga as a symbolic reference to the two departed souls.

Many Jewish family names are derived from these terms, their variants or patronymics (a name derived from a male ancestor's personal name), or from their translations into different languages, such as the Greek Phoebus, the Latin Lucius, the Spanish Lombroso, the German Licht and Feuer.
ID Number:
132620
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Marcel Saragea (born Marcel Srager) (1914-1998), physician and researcher, born in Barlad, Romania. He attended high school in Barlad and then graduated from the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Bucharest. A specialist in immunology and allergology, he is the author of important medical works and established the pathophysiology education in Romania serving as head of this department at the University of Medicine and Pharmacy in Bucharest. Saragea was CEO of the Amalia and Dr. Moses Rosen Nursing Home of the Federation of the Jewish Communities in Romania (FCER) and a member of the FCER leadership.  His publications include the two volume Tratat de fiziopatologie (“Treatise on pathophysiology”, 1985).

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Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
SHRAGER Origin of surname
SHRAGER

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. This family name derives from a Jewish value or religious concepts. It is also derived from an Aramaic personal name or title. The Jewish surname Shrager, in which the German/Yiddish suffix "-er" means "of/from" and can stand for "son of", is derived from the male personal name Shraga, a Hebrew name deriving from the Aramaic for "fire/light". It is associated with wisdom and sharpness of mind. In talmudic times, people credited with bringing light or intellectual clarity to their subject were given the Hebrew name Meir ("one who enlightens"), Yair ("he will bring light") or the Aramaic forms, Nehorai, Nahor, Shraga. As personal names, Uri and Schraga often appeared in combination as an apotropaism, given in order to ward off danger and evil. An infant orphaned of both parents would be given the secular name Vives (an equivalent of Hayyim, that is "life"), and also the Hebrew Uri Shraga as a symbolic reference to the two departed souls.

Many Jewish family names are derived from these terms, their variants or patronymics (a name derived from a male ancestor's personal name), or from their translations into different languages, such as the Greek Phoebus, the Latin Lucius, the Spanish Lombroso, the German Licht and Feuer.
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Marcel Saragea

Marcel Saragea (born Marcel Srager) (1914-1998), physician and researcher, born in Barlad, Romania. He attended high school in Barlad and then graduated from the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Bucharest. A specialist in immunology and allergology, he is the author of important medical works and established the pathophysiology education in Romania serving as head of this department at the University of Medicine and Pharmacy in Bucharest. Saragea was CEO of the Amalia and Dr. Moses Rosen Nursing Home of the Federation of the Jewish Communities in Romania (FCER) and a member of the FCER leadership.  His publications include the two volume Tratat de fiziopatologie (“Treatise on pathophysiology”, 1985).