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The Jewish Community of Mansura

Mansura (el Mantsura; al-Mantsura; al-Mansurah)

In Arabic: المنصورة‎‎

Town of Lower Egypt, on the right bank of the eastern arm of the Nile.

Founded during the 13th century, Mansura has become an important center for the cotton commerce in modern times. The Jewish population grew under Turkish rule and by the 17th century there was an organized community led by the rabbis Elijah Shushi (Shoshi) and Shabbetai Ha-Kohen.
During the middle of the 19th century, Jacob Saphir found 40 families in the town, most of who had come from Cairo and Damietta. During the second half of the 19th century, when blood libels were brought against the Jews in various Egyptian towns, the Jews of Mansura were also accused. In 1877 during Passover, the Jews were accused of having slaughtered a Muslim child in order to use his blood for the baking of matzot. At the end of the 19th century, the number of Jews was about 500 and it continued to increase at the beginning of the 20th century. A well-organized community was set up in 1918 and educational and charitable institutions were established. An "Alliance Israelite Universelle" school was inaugurated in 1903. In 1917 the Jewish community reached 586 people, its number continuing to increase. A Zionist association was also founded in the town. After World War I there was a decrease in the population. In 1927 there were still 563 Jews there, but a few years later there were only 150 to 200 Jews left, and by 1971 the community no longer existed.

Place Type:
City
ID Number:
130508
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
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Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
The Jewish Community of Mansura

Mansura (el Mantsura; al-Mantsura; al-Mansurah)

In Arabic: المنصورة‎‎

Town of Lower Egypt, on the right bank of the eastern arm of the Nile.

Founded during the 13th century, Mansura has become an important center for the cotton commerce in modern times. The Jewish population grew under Turkish rule and by the 17th century there was an organized community led by the rabbis Elijah Shushi (Shoshi) and Shabbetai Ha-Kohen.
During the middle of the 19th century, Jacob Saphir found 40 families in the town, most of who had come from Cairo and Damietta. During the second half of the 19th century, when blood libels were brought against the Jews in various Egyptian towns, the Jews of Mansura were also accused. In 1877 during Passover, the Jews were accused of having slaughtered a Muslim child in order to use his blood for the baking of matzot. At the end of the 19th century, the number of Jews was about 500 and it continued to increase at the beginning of the 20th century. A well-organized community was set up in 1918 and educational and charitable institutions were established. An "Alliance Israelite Universelle" school was inaugurated in 1903. In 1917 the Jewish community reached 586 people, its number continuing to increase. A Zionist association was also founded in the town. After World War I there was a decrease in the population. In 1927 there were still 563 Jews there, but a few years later there were only 150 to 200 Jews left, and by 1971 the community no longer existed.

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People