Search
Your Selected Item:
Photos
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions

Stone relief of the priestly blessing and an Hebrew name in the courtyard of the former old synagogue, Obernai, France, 1996

Print
Share

Stone relief from 1702? of the priestly blessing and the name "Rabbi Shimshon Katz" in Hebrew, on a pillar capital at the entrance to the courtyard of the former old synagogue on 43 Gouraud street, Obernai, Alsace, France, October 1996
Photo: Rachel Schnold Sternkranz
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot, courtesy of Rachel Schnold Sternkranz)

Photo period:
1702
ID Number:
128255
Image Purchase: For more details about image purchasing Click here, make sure you have the photo ID number (as appear above)
Nearby places:
Related items:

Obernai

In German: Oberehnheim

A town in the department of Bas- Rhin, France.

The first evidence for the presence of Jews in Obernai dates from 1215. In 1349 a Jewish woman who had been sentenced to death for coin clipping accused the Jews of propagating the black death, whereupon all the Jews of Obernai were burned at the stake. Jews were recorded as living in Obernai again between 1437 and 1477 and from 1498 to 1507. Subsequently Jews were rarely even allowed to travel through Obernai or permitted to visit the local market. Only in 1647, when the town passed from French rule, were Jews again permitted to settle there. In 1784 the number of Jews in Obernai was 196. Many more were recorded as living there on the eve of World War II.

About 60 lived there in 1970.

our Open Databases
Jewish Genealogy
Family Names
Jewish Communities
Visual Documentation
Jewish Music Center
Photos
אA
אA
אA
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
Stone relief of the priestly blessing and an Hebrew name in the courtyard of the former old synagogue, Obernai, France, 1996

Stone relief from 1702? of the priestly blessing and the name "Rabbi Shimshon Katz" in Hebrew, on a pillar capital at the entrance to the courtyard of the former old synagogue on 43 Gouraud street, Obernai, Alsace, France, October 1996
Photo: Rachel Schnold Sternkranz
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot, courtesy of Rachel Schnold Sternkranz)

Image Purchase: For more details about image purchasing Click here, make sure you have the photo ID number (as appear above)

Obernai

Obernai

In German: Oberehnheim

A town in the department of Bas- Rhin, France.

The first evidence for the presence of Jews in Obernai dates from 1215. In 1349 a Jewish woman who had been sentenced to death for coin clipping accused the Jews of propagating the black death, whereupon all the Jews of Obernai were burned at the stake. Jews were recorded as living in Obernai again between 1437 and 1477 and from 1498 to 1507. Subsequently Jews were rarely even allowed to travel through Obernai or permitted to visit the local market. Only in 1647, when the town passed from French rule, were Jews again permitted to settle there. In 1784 the number of Jews in Obernai was 196. Many more were recorded as living there on the eve of World War II.

About 60 lived there in 1970.