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Girls at the English Public School in Shanghai, China 1930s

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Girls at the English Public School where many
of the daughters of the rich Jewish families studied,
Shanghai, China 1930s
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot, courtesy of Mercia Grant)
ID Number:
127533
Image Purchase: For more details about image purchasing Click here, make sure you have the photo ID number (as appear above)
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Shanghai

In Chinese: 上海市

A port in Kiangsu province, China's largest city and a global financial hub, east China.

It was opened to foreign trade in 1843. A flourishing foreign community developed there, including Jews of various nationalities. They were mostly Sephardim from Baghdad, Bombay, and Cairo, including such well- known families as Sassoon, Kadoorie, Hardoon, Ezra, Shamoon, and Baroukh. There were three synagogues in shanghai, and between 1904 and 1939, 12 Jewish magazines in English, German, and Russian were founded there. The leading one was Israel's messenger, a Zionist monthly established in 1904 by N.E.B. Ezra and published until his death in 1936. Before World War I the Jewish population numbered around 700, with 400 Sephardim of Baghdad origin, 250 Europeans, and 50 Americans. Most of them were engaged in commerce, while a few were in the diplomatic service and in medicine or teaching. Their number was substantially increased to around 25,000, first by Jews from Russia fleeing from the 1917 revolution, then between 1932 and 1940 by refugees from Nazism in Germany and German-occupied countries who found out that they could enter the free port of Shanghai without visas.

The Japanese closed Shanghai to further immigration and after the outbreak of the pacific war in December 1941 they deported to Shanghai most of the Jews living in Japan or in transit to other countries. Substantial aid was given locally, especially by Sir Victor Sassoon, Horace Kadoorie, and Paul Komor. Additional funds came from abroad. With the outbreak of the Pacific war the position of all Jews became desperate. Most of them were kept in semi-internment under miserable conditions in the Kongkew district, subject to the whim of the Japanese occupation forces. They had great difficulty in finding employment and most of their property was confiscated under one pretext or another. Almost all of them left shanghai after World War II, largely with American help, for Israel, the United States, or other parts of the world. A few elderly people remained to live out their days under the Chinese communists.

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Girls at the English Public School in Shanghai, China 1930s
Girls at the English Public School where many
of the daughters of the rich Jewish families studied,
Shanghai, China 1930s
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot, courtesy of Mercia Grant)
Image Purchase: For more details about image purchasing Click here, make sure you have the photo ID number (as appear above)

Shanghai

Shanghai

In Chinese: 上海市

A port in Kiangsu province, China's largest city and a global financial hub, east China.

It was opened to foreign trade in 1843. A flourishing foreign community developed there, including Jews of various nationalities. They were mostly Sephardim from Baghdad, Bombay, and Cairo, including such well- known families as Sassoon, Kadoorie, Hardoon, Ezra, Shamoon, and Baroukh. There were three synagogues in shanghai, and between 1904 and 1939, 12 Jewish magazines in English, German, and Russian were founded there. The leading one was Israel's messenger, a Zionist monthly established in 1904 by N.E.B. Ezra and published until his death in 1936. Before World War I the Jewish population numbered around 700, with 400 Sephardim of Baghdad origin, 250 Europeans, and 50 Americans. Most of them were engaged in commerce, while a few were in the diplomatic service and in medicine or teaching. Their number was substantially increased to around 25,000, first by Jews from Russia fleeing from the 1917 revolution, then between 1932 and 1940 by refugees from Nazism in Germany and German-occupied countries who found out that they could enter the free port of Shanghai without visas.

The Japanese closed Shanghai to further immigration and after the outbreak of the pacific war in December 1941 they deported to Shanghai most of the Jews living in Japan or in transit to other countries. Substantial aid was given locally, especially by Sir Victor Sassoon, Horace Kadoorie, and Paul Komor. Additional funds came from abroad. With the outbreak of the Pacific war the position of all Jews became desperate. Most of them were kept in semi-internment under miserable conditions in the Kongkew district, subject to the whim of the Japanese occupation forces. They had great difficulty in finding employment and most of their property was confiscated under one pretext or another. Almost all of them left shanghai after World War II, largely with American help, for Israel, the United States, or other parts of the world. A few elderly people remained to live out their days under the Chinese communists.