Search
Print
Share
Your Selected Item:
1 \ 3
Removed
Added
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions

The Jewish Community of Gura Humorului

Gura Humorului

In German: Gura Humora

A town in Suceava County in the historic region of Bukovina, Romania. Until 1918 it was part of Austria-Hungary.

Frescos with a tableau of the "day of judgment" painted between 1547 and 1550 depicting among others Turkish and Jewish figures are found in the Voronet monastery there. Jewish settlement began in Gura Humorului under Austrian rule in 1835, with five Jewish families (in a total population of 700). They increased to 20 by 1848 and formed an organized community. Prayers were first held in a private house. The first synagogue was erected in 1869, and the great synagogue in 1871. As in the other communities of Bukovina, the influence of Chasidism was strong. At first occupied as craftsmen, merchants, and purveyors to the Austrian army, Jews later established workshops for wood processing and lumber mills. At the close of the 19th century, they played an important role in the industrialization of the town. The community numbered 130 persons in 1856, 190 in 1867, 800 in 1869, 1,206 in 1890, 2,050 in 1910, and 1,951 in 1927.

After the town passed to Romania at the end of World War I, and throughout the period between the two World Wars, the authorities endeavored to restrict the Jews in their economic activities while there were also occasional anti-Semitic outbreaks. The Zionist movement, formed locally at the beginning of the 20th century, had a large following. Aliyah to Eretz Israel began during the 1930s. At the time of the persecutions by the Romanian fascists, 2,954 local Jews and others who had gathered there from the surrounding area were deported in a single day (October 10, 1941) to Transnistria, where most of them died. After the end of World War II, the survivors returned to the town; they were joined by other Jewish inhabitants of the region who returned from their places of deportation, and numbered 1,158 in 1948. Nearly all the Jews there immigrated to Israel between 1948 and 1951.

in 1997 only 10 Jews lived in Gura-Humorului, with a synagogue.

Place Type:
City
ID Number:
118714
Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People
Nearby places:

Related items:
The Town of Gura-Humorului in Bucovina,
Romania, 1920-1930
One third of its population was Jewish
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot
courtesy of Zusia Efron, Jerusalem)
Halutzim cutting wood in Gura-Humorului,
Bukovina, Romania, 1935
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
Bequest of the late David Vinitzki, Israel)
Tombstone dated 1873 in the Jewish cemetery
in Gura-Humorului, Bukovina, Rumania, 1974
Photo: Lajos Erdelyi, Hungary
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot, Lajos Erdelyi collection)

Romania

România

A country in eastern Europe, member of the European Union (EU)

21st Century

Estimated Jewish population in 2018: 9,000 out of 19,500,000.  Before the Holocaust Romania was home to the second largest Jewish community in Europe, and the fourth largest in the world, after USSR, USA, and Poland. Main Jewish organization:

Federaţia Comunităţilor Evreieşti Din România - Federation of Jewish Communities in Romania
Str. Sf. Vineri nr. 9-11 sector 3, Bucuresti, Romania
Phone: 021-315.50.90
Fax: 021-313.10.28
Email: secretariat@fcer.ro
Website: www.jewishfed.ro

Bălăceana 

A village in Suceava County, Romania. 

Until the end of World War I Bălăceana was part of Austria-Hungary.

The Jews settled in Bălăceana at the end of the 19th century. They engaged in agriculture, cattle breeding and trade. They had small farms, which they worked on their own or with the help of employees.

During World War I the community was harmed as a result of the battles fought in the region. The Romanian government, after the First World War, worsened their situation and a law passed in 1934 to reduce the peasant debts to Jews, was exploited by anti-Semitic instigators to organize riots, during which Jews were harmed, their property was looted and the synagogue destroyed. Disruptions were stopped after government intervention.

The Jews of Bălăceana did not set up a community and they were affiliated to the Jewish community of Suceava. The Jews of the village were followers of the Vizhnitzer rebbe and were known as scholars. Bălăceana was nicknamed the "Little Land of Israel." Before the construction of the wooden synagogue in 1910, the locals prayed in a private house. There was also a mikveh and a traditional heder. The dead were buried in the Suceava community cemetery, 10 km away.

Between the two world wars a branch of the Mizrahi Zionist organization and a branch of Agudat Israel were active in Bălăceana.

According to the 1930 census, there were 234 Jews in Bălăceana which constituted 5% of the total population.

 

The Holocaust period

The rise to power of the Goga-Cuza government in December 1937 led to the enactment and implementation of official anti-Semitic policies in Romania.

In September 1940, a government headed by General Ion Antonescu was formed in Romania. This government included the Iron Guard Party - a nationalist party that advocated violent anti-Semitism. Ion Antonescu's government changed Romania's foreign policy and Romania joined the alliance between Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. This government increased the persecution of the Jews and led a regime of terror against them.

The situation of the Jews soon deteriorated. Their lands, cattle and grain stocks were confiscated. Most of the Jews left the village destitute. In January 1941, the last of the Jews moved to Suceava, after being tortured by the Iron Guard and their property looted.

In June 1941 Romania joined the war against the Soviet Union. In the fall of 1941, the Jews of Bălăceana along with the Jews of Suceava were deported to Transnistria.

At the end of the war only a few returned.

Suceava

In German: Suczawa

A city in Suceava district, Bukovina, northern Romania. Formerly capital of Moldavia, from 1774 to the end of World War I was part of the Austrian Empire..

Jews lived there from the beginning of the 18th century. In 1774, there were 50 at the beginning of Austrian rule, there were 50 Jewish families (209 persons) living in the town. Although the Jews were oppressed by the Austrian authorities, their number increased as a result of immigration from Galicia and Russia. In 1782, 92 Jews were expelled from Suceava, the Austrian authorities claiming that they were unable to pay the taxes. Representatives of Suceava Jewry took an active part in the struggle of the Jews of Bukovina against the oppressions of the Austrian authorities. There were 160 Jewish families in Suceava in 1791, and 272, with the Jews in the vicinity, according to data of 1817. After 1848 their numbers increased rapidly, and the Jewish population numbered 3,750 (37.1%) in 1880; 6,787 in 1901; and 8,000 on the outbreak of World War I. With the advent of Romanian rule, many Jews moved to Chernovtsy and other places; there remained 3,496 in 1930.

The communal institutions included a Jewish school, opened in 1790. A large synagogue was renovated at the beginning of the 19th century. Jews also prayed in many Battei Midrash and a number of houses of prayer (Kloysen). Chasidic influence in the community was strong. Zionist activity had been initiated during the Chibbat Zion period, and an organization of Zionist students existed in Suceava before the first Zionist congress. A number of smaller Jewish communities were affiliated to the Suceava community until they became independent. Jews engaged in the trade of alcoholic liquor, wine, and beer. The cultural orientation was German. Jews played important roles in both municipal and national political life.

The local Jews were persecuted by the Nazi German and Romanian authorities between 1940 and 1941. When deported to Transnistria in 1941, they numbered 3,253. Only 27 remained in the town.

After World War II, when northern Bukovina was annexed by the Soviet Union, many Jews from Chernovtsy and other places in northern Bukovina who arrived in Suceava chose to remain there. Their numbers rose to 4,000, and community life was active during that period. The number of Jews subsequently declined as a result of emigration to Israel and other places. In 1971, there were still about 290 Jewish families in the town and Jewish life was maintained to a limited degree. Prayers were held in the central synagogue and a number of other places.

Bucșoaia

A village, today a municipal section of the town of Frasin in Suceava district in the historical region of Bucovina, Romania. Until 1918 it was part of Austria-Hungary.

The beginnings of the Jewish settlement in Bucșoaia are not known. The 1930 census recorded 11 Jews who constituted 0.8% of the total population in Bucșoaia.

Most of the village's Jews traded in wood, one Jew owned a sawmill and another Jew named Ettl Sharf owned a mill. Ella Binner and Strul (Israel) Haim Friedman owned a grocery store, and Nathan Tobak owned a pub. No community has been established in Bucsoaia. The Jews of the village belonged to the Jewish community in the town of Gura-Humorului which provided them with religious and community services. The Jews of Bucșoaia prayed in the synagogue of Frasin, then a village near Bucșoaia. A Jew of Bucșoaia served as the gabbay of the Great Synagogue in Frasin. The shochet of Frasin also served the Jews of Bucșoaia until the late 1930s, when a local shochet was appointed.

The Holocaust

The rise to power of the Goga-Cuza government in December 1937 led to the enactment and implementation of official anti-Semitic policies in Romania.

In September 1940, a government headed by General Ion Antonescu was formed in Romania. This government included the Iron Guard Party - a nationalist party that advocated violent anti-Semitism. Ion Antonescu's government changed Romania's foreign policy and Romania joined the alliance between Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. This government increased the persecution of the Jews and led a regime of terror against them.

After Romania joined the war against the USSR in June 1941, the Jews of Bucșoaia were evacuated to Gura Humorului. In the fall of 1941, they were deported to Transnistria together with the Jews of Gura Humoruloi.

קומאנשט

Comănești

כפר במחוז סוצ'יאווה, חבל בוקובינה, רומניה.  עד 1918 היה חלק מאוסטריה-הונגריה.

בתחילת המאה ה-20 התגוררו בכפר 192 יהודים אשר היוו 14.9% מכלל האוכלוסיה. במהלך מחתית הראשונה של המאה ה-20 מספר התושבים הי הודים הלך וירד.

בשנת 1930 אירעו בכפר פרעות נגד יהודים, למרות התערבות השלטונות ומאסר 40 מבין הפורעים. ההסתה האנטישמית הגוברת גרמה ב-1936 להתנפלות על בית הכנסת. חורבן הביניין נמנע ע"י מחלקת ז’נדרמים שהגיעו מסוצ'יאווה ועצרו 15 מתפרעים.

במפקד האוכלוסין של 1930 נרשמו בכפר 121 יהודים אשר היוו 8% מאוכלוסיית המקום.

תקופת השואה

העליה לשלטון של ממשלת גוגה-קוזה בדצמבר 1937 הובילה לחקיקה ויישום של מדיניות אנטישמית רשמית ברומניה.

בעקבות הסכם ריבנטרופ-מולוטוב מאוגוסט 1939 בין גרמניה הנאצית לברה"מ, אזור צפון בוקובינה סופח לברה"מ ב-28 ביוני 1940. חיילים של הצבא הרומני הנסוג מהאזור המסופח, בהגיעם לכפר שנשאר בגבולות רומניה, זרקו מתוך רכבת את האחים זיסמן ,שני תושבים יהודים, וירו בהם למוות. התנהגותם של החיילים הרומנים עודדה כנופיות של איכרים מקומיים לתקוף את השכנים היהודים שלהם. בקומאנשט הרב לייב שכטר נרצח ביחד עם רעייתו ושני בניהם. רוב היהודים נטשו את הכפר ונמלטו חלקם לערי דרום בוקובינה שנותרו בשלטון רומניה, וחלקם לצפון בוקובינה שסופח לברית המועצות. בכפר עצמו קבעה "ועדת הניהול של הרכוש הנטוש" כי אין יותר יהודים בקומאנשט ובינואר 1941 הוחרם כל הרכוש היהודי בכפר.

בספטמבר 1940 הוקמה ברומניה ממשלה בראשותו של הגנרל יון אנטונסקו. ממשלה זאת כללה את מפלגת "משמר הברזל" - מפלגה לאומנית שדגלה באנטישמיות אלימה. הממשלה של יון אנטונסקו שינתה את מדיניות החוץ של רומניה וצירפה את המדינה אל הברית בין גרמניה הנאצית ואיטליה הפשיסטית. הממשלה הזאת הגבירה את רדיפת היהודים והנהגה משטר של טרור נגדם.

ביוני 1941 רומניה הצטרפה למלחמה נגד ברית המועצות. מעט היהודים שנותרו בקומאנשט גורשו אל העיר סוצ'יאווה. באוקטובר 1941 יהודי סוצ'יאווה גורשו לטרניסטריה. במהלך חודש יולי 1941 חזר השלטון הרומני לצפון בוקובינה. פליטי קומאנשט, בישובים בהם השתקעו, שותפו בגורל היהודים המקומיים ובסתיו אותה שנה גורשו לטרנסמניסטריה.

פרסין

Frasin

בגרמנית: Frassin

עיירה במחוז סוצ'יאווה בחבל בוקובינה, רומניה. עד 1918 האזור היה החלק מאוסטריה-הונגריה.

היישוב נוסד בראשית המאה ה-19. רוב תושבים הראשונים היו חוטבי עצים גרמנים. היהודים הראשונים, רובם מהגרים מגליציה ופודוליה, הגיעו לפרסין באמצע המאה ה-19. בשנת 1890 התגוררו בפרסין 261 יהודים.

היהודים עסקו לרוב במסחר ובמלאכה. בשנת 1916, מבין 31 הסוחרים בפרסין, 30 היו יהודים. מספר מועט של יהודים היו בעלי מנסרות. אחד מבעלי המנסרות במקום שהפיקה את הקרשים לתיבות פרי הדר של חברת "פרדס" בארץ ישראל היה אביו של פרופ' חיים שיבא, לימים מייסד חיל הרפואה בצה"ל ומנהל בית החולים תל השומר (הנקרא היום על שמו). השליח שהגיע מטעם החברה להשגיח על ייצור התיבות הביא איתו ספרים על תולדות הציונות, ייסד אירגון ציוני ועורר פעילות ציונית בכפר. יש לציין שבמקום התגוררו שני רופאים יהודים. 

יהודי פרסין השתייכו לקהילה היהודית בגורה-הומורולוי אשר סיפקה את השירותים הדתיים-קהילתיים. בכפר פעלו שני בתי כנסת ומקווה טהרה. שני "חדרים" העניקו לילדים חינוך מסורתי. בין שתי מלחמות העלם יהודי כיהן כחבר במועצת הכפר.

במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 1930 נרשמו בפרסין 156 יהודים אשר היוו 7.3% מכלל התושבים.

 

תקופת השואה

העליה לשלטון של ממשלת גוגה-קוזה בדצמבר 1937 הובילה לחקיקה ויישום של מדיניות אנטישמית רשמית ברומניה.

בספטמבר 1940 הוקמה ברומניה ממשלה בראשותו של הגנרל יון אנטונסקו. ממשלה זאת כללה את מפלגת "משמר הברזל" - מפלגה לאומנית שדגלה באנטישמיות אלימה. הממשלה של יון אנטונסקו שינתה את מדיניות החוץ של רומניה וצירפה את המדינה אל הברית בין גרמניה הנאצית ואיטליה הפשיסטית. הממשלה הזאת הגבירה את רדיפת היהודים והנהגה משטר של טרור נגדם.

יהודי הכפר נצטוו לעבור תוך שעות ספורות לעיירה גורה-הומורולוי. ביוני 1941 רומניה הצטרפה למלחמה נגד ברה"מ. בסתיו 1941 יהודי פרסין גורשו לגטאות ומחנות הריכוז בטרנסניסטריה. בסוף שנת 1942 שני יהודים מבין אלה שגורשו לטרנסניסטריה הוחזרו לפרסין ע"י חברה לעיבוד עצים כדי להעסיק אותם במנסרה המקומית. התנגדות התושבים המקומיים לשובם של שני היהודים האלה הייתה כה חריפה עד שהחברה הציבה להם שומרים ובסוף נאלצה להעביר אותם למקומות אחרים.

בשנת 2002 בין למעלה מ-6,500 תושבים בפרסין, לא היה אף יהודי.

Ilișești

In German: Illischestie

A village in the district of Suceava in the historical region of Bukovina, Romania. Until 1918 the area was part of Austria-Hungary.

The Christian population of the village was mostly German, descendants of settlers who came from the Swabian region in southern Germany, and partly Romanian. The Jews began to settle in the village in the middle of the 19th century. The Romanians and Germans lived in separate neighborhoods. The Jews lived in the German neighborhood and had a good relationship with them that did not continue even after the Nazis came to power in Germany. The Jews spoke German in the Swabian dialect and sent their children to the German school.

Most of the Jews were engaged in trade and crafts. In 1924 there were 4 grocery owners in the village - Isac Grünberg, David Schächter, Iosif Suchar and Elias Tabac, 2 tailors - David Ianz and Leib Oclbert, 2 craftsmen - Jacob Eidinger and Haim M. Schmelzer and one tanner - Isac Ehrlich.

There was no independent Jewish community. The Jews of Ilișești belonged to the Jewish community in the nearby town of Gura Humorului, which provided them with community and religious services. The Jews of Ilișești had a mikve and they employed a shochet. The Jews of the village were Hasidim, and held their prayers in the two local synagogues, one belonged to the Viznitz Hasidim and the other to Sadigura Hasidim.

The 1930 census recorded 130 Jews in the village, who constituted 3% of the total population.

 

The Holocaust period

The rise to power of the Goga-Cuza government in December 1937 led to the enactment and implementation of official anti-Semitic policies in Romania.

In September 1940, a government headed by General Ion Antonescu was formed in Romania. This government included the Iron Guard Party - a nationalist party that advocated violent anti-Semitism. Ion Antonescu's government changed Romania's foreign policy and Romania joined the alliance between Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. This government increased the persecution of the Jews and led a regime of terror against them.

Following an agreement between Romania and Germany, the German residents of Ilișești were transferred to Germany. The Jews encountered the hostility of the Romanian peasants and all but nine moved to the nearby towns of Suceava and Gura-Humorului.

In June 1941, Romania joined the war against the USSR. In the autumn of 1941, the Jews of Ilișești, together with the Jews of the towns to which they had moved, were deported to ghettos and concentration camps in Transnistria.

מולדוביצה

Moldovița

בגרמנית: Russ Moldowitza

כפר במלוז סוצ'יאווה בחבל בוקובינה, רומניה. עד שנת 1918 האזור היה חלק מאוסטריה-הונגריה.

יהודי הכפר עסקו רובם במלאכות הקשורות בתעשיית העץ שבאזור, מעוטם בחייטות, סנדלרות ועוד. שלושה יהודים היו רופאים. בשנת 1924 רשומים במולדוביצה שלושה חייטים – גרשון גלר, מקס פוגל וקופל פישל, שלושה בעלי מנסרות – יעקב מאירוביץ', ליטמן ומשולם שרף, פחח אחד - לאון פורמן, בעלת טחנת קמח – ייטי הזנפרץ, סנדלר אחד – אפרים פורמן, ושען אחד – אדולף ברנפלד.

במקום לא התקיימה קהילה יהודית עצמאית והקהילה יהודית בוואמה, במרחק 20 ק"מ, סיפקה להם את השירותים הדתיים-קהילתיים. בשנת 1931 יהודי מולדוביצה התארגנו כקהילה עצמאית שאליה סונפו גם היהודים שהתגוררו בכפר ואטרה-מולדוביציי הסמוך. במולדוביצה פעלו בית כנסת, מקווה טהרה והחל משנת 1931 גם בית עלמין. בכפר היה סניף של ההסתדרות הציונית. יהודי אחד או שניים כיהנו כחברים במועצת הכפר.

במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 1930 נרשמו במולדוביצה 436 יהודים אשר היוו 13.5% מכלל התושבים. במקום קיים בית הקברות היהודי.

 

תקופת השואה

העליה לשלטון של ממשלת גוגה-קוזה בדצמבר 1937 הובילה לחקיקה ויישום של מדיניות אנטישמית רשמית ברומניה.

בספטמבר 1940 הוקמה ברומניה ממשלה בראשותו של הגנרל יון אנטונסקו. ממשלה זאת כללה את מפלגת "משמר הברזל" - מפלגה לאומנית שדגלה באנטישמיות אלימה. הממשלה של יון אנטונסקו שינתה את מדיניות החוץ של רומניה וצירפה את המדינה אל הברית בין גרמניה הנאצית ואיטליה הפשיסטית. הממשלה הזאת הגבירה את רדיפת היהודים והנהגה משטר של טרור נגדם.

כעבור חדשיים, יהודי מולדוביצה נאלצו לעזוב את כפרם ונמלטו לעיר גורה-הומורולוי. 

ביוני 1941 רומניה הצטרפה אל המלחמה נגד ברית המועצות. בסתיו של שנת 1941 יחד עם יהודי גורה-הומורולוי, יהודי מולדוביצה גורשו לגטאות ומחנות הריכוז בטרנסניסטריה.   

אחרי המלחמה כמה מהניצולים נרצחו בדרכם חזרה. בשנת 1947 היו בכפר 130 יהודים. במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 2002 נרשם יהודי אחד בין סה"כ 5,021 תושבים.

our Open Databases
Jewish Genealogy
Family Names
Jewish Communities
Visual Documentation
Jewish Music Center
Place
אA
אA
אA
Would you like to help us improving the content? Send us your suggestions
The Jewish Community of Gura Humorului

Gura Humorului

In German: Gura Humora

A town in Suceava County in the historic region of Bukovina, Romania. Until 1918 it was part of Austria-Hungary.

Frescos with a tableau of the "day of judgment" painted between 1547 and 1550 depicting among others Turkish and Jewish figures are found in the Voronet monastery there. Jewish settlement began in Gura Humorului under Austrian rule in 1835, with five Jewish families (in a total population of 700). They increased to 20 by 1848 and formed an organized community. Prayers were first held in a private house. The first synagogue was erected in 1869, and the great synagogue in 1871. As in the other communities of Bukovina, the influence of Chasidism was strong. At first occupied as craftsmen, merchants, and purveyors to the Austrian army, Jews later established workshops for wood processing and lumber mills. At the close of the 19th century, they played an important role in the industrialization of the town. The community numbered 130 persons in 1856, 190 in 1867, 800 in 1869, 1,206 in 1890, 2,050 in 1910, and 1,951 in 1927.

After the town passed to Romania at the end of World War I, and throughout the period between the two World Wars, the authorities endeavored to restrict the Jews in their economic activities while there were also occasional anti-Semitic outbreaks. The Zionist movement, formed locally at the beginning of the 20th century, had a large following. Aliyah to Eretz Israel began during the 1930s. At the time of the persecutions by the Romanian fascists, 2,954 local Jews and others who had gathered there from the surrounding area were deported in a single day (October 10, 1941) to Transnistria, where most of them died. After the end of World War II, the survivors returned to the town; they were joined by other Jewish inhabitants of the region who returned from their places of deportation, and numbered 1,158 in 1948. Nearly all the Jews there immigrated to Israel between 1948 and 1951.

in 1997 only 10 Jews lived in Gura-Humorului, with a synagogue.

Written by researchers of ANU Museum of the Jewish People

Moldovita
Ilisesti
Frasin
Comanesti
Bucșoaia
Suceava
Balaceana 
Romania

מולדוביצה

Moldovița

בגרמנית: Russ Moldowitza

כפר במלוז סוצ'יאווה בחבל בוקובינה, רומניה. עד שנת 1918 האזור היה חלק מאוסטריה-הונגריה.

יהודי הכפר עסקו רובם במלאכות הקשורות בתעשיית העץ שבאזור, מעוטם בחייטות, סנדלרות ועוד. שלושה יהודים היו רופאים. בשנת 1924 רשומים במולדוביצה שלושה חייטים – גרשון גלר, מקס פוגל וקופל פישל, שלושה בעלי מנסרות – יעקב מאירוביץ', ליטמן ומשולם שרף, פחח אחד - לאון פורמן, בעלת טחנת קמח – ייטי הזנפרץ, סנדלר אחד – אפרים פורמן, ושען אחד – אדולף ברנפלד.

במקום לא התקיימה קהילה יהודית עצמאית והקהילה יהודית בוואמה, במרחק 20 ק"מ, סיפקה להם את השירותים הדתיים-קהילתיים. בשנת 1931 יהודי מולדוביצה התארגנו כקהילה עצמאית שאליה סונפו גם היהודים שהתגוררו בכפר ואטרה-מולדוביציי הסמוך. במולדוביצה פעלו בית כנסת, מקווה טהרה והחל משנת 1931 גם בית עלמין. בכפר היה סניף של ההסתדרות הציונית. יהודי אחד או שניים כיהנו כחברים במועצת הכפר.

במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 1930 נרשמו במולדוביצה 436 יהודים אשר היוו 13.5% מכלל התושבים. במקום קיים בית הקברות היהודי.

 

תקופת השואה

העליה לשלטון של ממשלת גוגה-קוזה בדצמבר 1937 הובילה לחקיקה ויישום של מדיניות אנטישמית רשמית ברומניה.

בספטמבר 1940 הוקמה ברומניה ממשלה בראשותו של הגנרל יון אנטונסקו. ממשלה זאת כללה את מפלגת "משמר הברזל" - מפלגה לאומנית שדגלה באנטישמיות אלימה. הממשלה של יון אנטונסקו שינתה את מדיניות החוץ של רומניה וצירפה את המדינה אל הברית בין גרמניה הנאצית ואיטליה הפשיסטית. הממשלה הזאת הגבירה את רדיפת היהודים והנהגה משטר של טרור נגדם.

כעבור חדשיים, יהודי מולדוביצה נאלצו לעזוב את כפרם ונמלטו לעיר גורה-הומורולוי. 

ביוני 1941 רומניה הצטרפה אל המלחמה נגד ברית המועצות. בסתיו של שנת 1941 יחד עם יהודי גורה-הומורולוי, יהודי מולדוביצה גורשו לגטאות ומחנות הריכוז בטרנסניסטריה.   

אחרי המלחמה כמה מהניצולים נרצחו בדרכם חזרה. בשנת 1947 היו בכפר 130 יהודים. במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 2002 נרשם יהודי אחד בין סה"כ 5,021 תושבים.

Ilișești

In German: Illischestie

A village in the district of Suceava in the historical region of Bukovina, Romania. Until 1918 the area was part of Austria-Hungary.

The Christian population of the village was mostly German, descendants of settlers who came from the Swabian region in southern Germany, and partly Romanian. The Jews began to settle in the village in the middle of the 19th century. The Romanians and Germans lived in separate neighborhoods. The Jews lived in the German neighborhood and had a good relationship with them that did not continue even after the Nazis came to power in Germany. The Jews spoke German in the Swabian dialect and sent their children to the German school.

Most of the Jews were engaged in trade and crafts. In 1924 there were 4 grocery owners in the village - Isac Grünberg, David Schächter, Iosif Suchar and Elias Tabac, 2 tailors - David Ianz and Leib Oclbert, 2 craftsmen - Jacob Eidinger and Haim M. Schmelzer and one tanner - Isac Ehrlich.

There was no independent Jewish community. The Jews of Ilișești belonged to the Jewish community in the nearby town of Gura Humorului, which provided them with community and religious services. The Jews of Ilișești had a mikve and they employed a shochet. The Jews of the village were Hasidim, and held their prayers in the two local synagogues, one belonged to the Viznitz Hasidim and the other to Sadigura Hasidim.

The 1930 census recorded 130 Jews in the village, who constituted 3% of the total population.

 

The Holocaust period

The rise to power of the Goga-Cuza government in December 1937 led to the enactment and implementation of official anti-Semitic policies in Romania.

In September 1940, a government headed by General Ion Antonescu was formed in Romania. This government included the Iron Guard Party - a nationalist party that advocated violent anti-Semitism. Ion Antonescu's government changed Romania's foreign policy and Romania joined the alliance between Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. This government increased the persecution of the Jews and led a regime of terror against them.

Following an agreement between Romania and Germany, the German residents of Ilișești were transferred to Germany. The Jews encountered the hostility of the Romanian peasants and all but nine moved to the nearby towns of Suceava and Gura-Humorului.

In June 1941, Romania joined the war against the USSR. In the autumn of 1941, the Jews of Ilișești, together with the Jews of the towns to which they had moved, were deported to ghettos and concentration camps in Transnistria.

פרסין

Frasin

בגרמנית: Frassin

עיירה במחוז סוצ'יאווה בחבל בוקובינה, רומניה. עד 1918 האזור היה החלק מאוסטריה-הונגריה.

היישוב נוסד בראשית המאה ה-19. רוב תושבים הראשונים היו חוטבי עצים גרמנים. היהודים הראשונים, רובם מהגרים מגליציה ופודוליה, הגיעו לפרסין באמצע המאה ה-19. בשנת 1890 התגוררו בפרסין 261 יהודים.

היהודים עסקו לרוב במסחר ובמלאכה. בשנת 1916, מבין 31 הסוחרים בפרסין, 30 היו יהודים. מספר מועט של יהודים היו בעלי מנסרות. אחד מבעלי המנסרות במקום שהפיקה את הקרשים לתיבות פרי הדר של חברת "פרדס" בארץ ישראל היה אביו של פרופ' חיים שיבא, לימים מייסד חיל הרפואה בצה"ל ומנהל בית החולים תל השומר (הנקרא היום על שמו). השליח שהגיע מטעם החברה להשגיח על ייצור התיבות הביא איתו ספרים על תולדות הציונות, ייסד אירגון ציוני ועורר פעילות ציונית בכפר. יש לציין שבמקום התגוררו שני רופאים יהודים. 

יהודי פרסין השתייכו לקהילה היהודית בגורה-הומורולוי אשר סיפקה את השירותים הדתיים-קהילתיים. בכפר פעלו שני בתי כנסת ומקווה טהרה. שני "חדרים" העניקו לילדים חינוך מסורתי. בין שתי מלחמות העלם יהודי כיהן כחבר במועצת הכפר.

במפקד האוכלוסין של שנת 1930 נרשמו בפרסין 156 יהודים אשר היוו 7.3% מכלל התושבים.

 

תקופת השואה

העליה לשלטון של ממשלת גוגה-קוזה בדצמבר 1937 הובילה לחקיקה ויישום של מדיניות אנטישמית רשמית ברומניה.

בספטמבר 1940 הוקמה ברומניה ממשלה בראשותו של הגנרל יון אנטונסקו. ממשלה זאת כללה את מפלגת "משמר הברזל" - מפלגה לאומנית שדגלה באנטישמיות אלימה. הממשלה של יון אנטונסקו שינתה את מדיניות החוץ של רומניה וצירפה את המדינה אל הברית בין גרמניה הנאצית ואיטליה הפשיסטית. הממשלה הזאת הגבירה את רדיפת היהודים והנהגה משטר של טרור נגדם.

יהודי הכפר נצטוו לעבור תוך שעות ספורות לעיירה גורה-הומורולוי. ביוני 1941 רומניה הצטרפה למלחמה נגד ברה"מ. בסתיו 1941 יהודי פרסין גורשו לגטאות ומחנות הריכוז בטרנסניסטריה. בסוף שנת 1942 שני יהודים מבין אלה שגורשו לטרנסניסטריה הוחזרו לפרסין ע"י חברה לעיבוד עצים כדי להעסיק אותם במנסרה המקומית. התנגדות התושבים המקומיים לשובם של שני היהודים האלה הייתה כה חריפה עד שהחברה הציבה להם שומרים ובסוף נאלצה להעביר אותם למקומות אחרים.

בשנת 2002 בין למעלה מ-6,500 תושבים בפרסין, לא היה אף יהודי.

קומאנשט

Comănești

כפר במחוז סוצ'יאווה, חבל בוקובינה, רומניה.  עד 1918 היה חלק מאוסטריה-הונגריה.

בתחילת המאה ה-20 התגוררו בכפר 192 יהודים אשר היוו 14.9% מכלל האוכלוסיה. במהלך מחתית הראשונה של המאה ה-20 מספר התושבים הי הודים הלך וירד.

בשנת 1930 אירעו בכפר פרעות נגד יהודים, למרות התערבות השלטונות ומאסר 40 מבין הפורעים. ההסתה האנטישמית הגוברת גרמה ב-1936 להתנפלות על בית הכנסת. חורבן הביניין נמנע ע"י מחלקת ז’נדרמים שהגיעו מסוצ'יאווה ועצרו 15 מתפרעים.

במפקד האוכלוסין של 1930 נרשמו בכפר 121 יהודים אשר היוו 8% מאוכלוסיית המקום.

תקופת השואה

העליה לשלטון של ממשלת גוגה-קוזה בדצמבר 1937 הובילה לחקיקה ויישום של מדיניות אנטישמית רשמית ברומניה.

בעקבות הסכם ריבנטרופ-מולוטוב מאוגוסט 1939 בין גרמניה הנאצית לברה"מ, אזור צפון בוקובינה סופח לברה"מ ב-28 ביוני 1940. חיילים של הצבא הרומני הנסוג מהאזור המסופח, בהגיעם לכפר שנשאר בגבולות רומניה, זרקו מתוך רכבת את האחים זיסמן ,שני תושבים יהודים, וירו בהם למוות. התנהגותם של החיילים הרומנים עודדה כנופיות של איכרים מקומיים לתקוף את השכנים היהודים שלהם. בקומאנשט הרב לייב שכטר נרצח ביחד עם רעייתו ושני בניהם. רוב היהודים נטשו את הכפר ונמלטו חלקם לערי דרום בוקובינה שנותרו בשלטון רומניה, וחלקם לצפון בוקובינה שסופח לברית המועצות. בכפר עצמו קבעה "ועדת הניהול של הרכוש הנטוש" כי אין יותר יהודים בקומאנשט ובינואר 1941 הוחרם כל הרכוש היהודי בכפר.

בספטמבר 1940 הוקמה ברומניה ממשלה בראשותו של הגנרל יון אנטונסקו. ממשלה זאת כללה את מפלגת "משמר הברזל" - מפלגה לאומנית שדגלה באנטישמיות אלימה. הממשלה של יון אנטונסקו שינתה את מדיניות החוץ של רומניה וצירפה את המדינה אל הברית בין גרמניה הנאצית ואיטליה הפשיסטית. הממשלה הזאת הגבירה את רדיפת היהודים והנהגה משטר של טרור נגדם.

ביוני 1941 רומניה הצטרפה למלחמה נגד ברית המועצות. מעט היהודים שנותרו בקומאנשט גורשו אל העיר סוצ'יאווה. באוקטובר 1941 יהודי סוצ'יאווה גורשו לטרניסטריה. במהלך חודש יולי 1941 חזר השלטון הרומני לצפון בוקובינה. פליטי קומאנשט, בישובים בהם השתקעו, שותפו בגורל היהודים המקומיים ובסתיו אותה שנה גורשו לטרנסמניסטריה.

Bucșoaia

A village, today a municipal section of the town of Frasin in Suceava district in the historical region of Bucovina, Romania. Until 1918 it was part of Austria-Hungary.

The beginnings of the Jewish settlement in Bucșoaia are not known. The 1930 census recorded 11 Jews who constituted 0.8% of the total population in Bucșoaia.

Most of the village's Jews traded in wood, one Jew owned a sawmill and another Jew named Ettl Sharf owned a mill. Ella Binner and Strul (Israel) Haim Friedman owned a grocery store, and Nathan Tobak owned a pub. No community has been established in Bucsoaia. The Jews of the village belonged to the Jewish community in the town of Gura-Humorului which provided them with religious and community services. The Jews of Bucșoaia prayed in the synagogue of Frasin, then a village near Bucșoaia. A Jew of Bucșoaia served as the gabbay of the Great Synagogue in Frasin. The shochet of Frasin also served the Jews of Bucșoaia until the late 1930s, when a local shochet was appointed.

The Holocaust

The rise to power of the Goga-Cuza government in December 1937 led to the enactment and implementation of official anti-Semitic policies in Romania.

In September 1940, a government headed by General Ion Antonescu was formed in Romania. This government included the Iron Guard Party - a nationalist party that advocated violent anti-Semitism. Ion Antonescu's government changed Romania's foreign policy and Romania joined the alliance between Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. This government increased the persecution of the Jews and led a regime of terror against them.

After Romania joined the war against the USSR in June 1941, the Jews of Bucșoaia were evacuated to Gura Humorului. In the fall of 1941, they were deported to Transnistria together with the Jews of Gura Humoruloi.

Suceava

In German: Suczawa

A city in Suceava district, Bukovina, northern Romania. Formerly capital of Moldavia, from 1774 to the end of World War I was part of the Austrian Empire..

Jews lived there from the beginning of the 18th century. In 1774, there were 50 at the beginning of Austrian rule, there were 50 Jewish families (209 persons) living in the town. Although the Jews were oppressed by the Austrian authorities, their number increased as a result of immigration from Galicia and Russia. In 1782, 92 Jews were expelled from Suceava, the Austrian authorities claiming that they were unable to pay the taxes. Representatives of Suceava Jewry took an active part in the struggle of the Jews of Bukovina against the oppressions of the Austrian authorities. There were 160 Jewish families in Suceava in 1791, and 272, with the Jews in the vicinity, according to data of 1817. After 1848 their numbers increased rapidly, and the Jewish population numbered 3,750 (37.1%) in 1880; 6,787 in 1901; and 8,000 on the outbreak of World War I. With the advent of Romanian rule, many Jews moved to Chernovtsy and other places; there remained 3,496 in 1930.

The communal institutions included a Jewish school, opened in 1790. A large synagogue was renovated at the beginning of the 19th century. Jews also prayed in many Battei Midrash and a number of houses of prayer (Kloysen). Chasidic influence in the community was strong. Zionist activity had been initiated during the Chibbat Zion period, and an organization of Zionist students existed in Suceava before the first Zionist congress. A number of smaller Jewish communities were affiliated to the Suceava community until they became independent. Jews engaged in the trade of alcoholic liquor, wine, and beer. The cultural orientation was German. Jews played important roles in both municipal and national political life.

The local Jews were persecuted by the Nazi German and Romanian authorities between 1940 and 1941. When deported to Transnistria in 1941, they numbered 3,253. Only 27 remained in the town.

After World War II, when northern Bukovina was annexed by the Soviet Union, many Jews from Chernovtsy and other places in northern Bukovina who arrived in Suceava chose to remain there. Their numbers rose to 4,000, and community life was active during that period. The number of Jews subsequently declined as a result of emigration to Israel and other places. In 1971, there were still about 290 Jewish families in the town and Jewish life was maintained to a limited degree. Prayers were held in the central synagogue and a number of other places.

Bălăceana 

A village in Suceava County, Romania. 

Until the end of World War I Bălăceana was part of Austria-Hungary.

The Jews settled in Bălăceana at the end of the 19th century. They engaged in agriculture, cattle breeding and trade. They had small farms, which they worked on their own or with the help of employees.

During World War I the community was harmed as a result of the battles fought in the region. The Romanian government, after the First World War, worsened their situation and a law passed in 1934 to reduce the peasant debts to Jews, was exploited by anti-Semitic instigators to organize riots, during which Jews were harmed, their property was looted and the synagogue destroyed. Disruptions were stopped after government intervention.

The Jews of Bălăceana did not set up a community and they were affiliated to the Jewish community of Suceava. The Jews of the village were followers of the Vizhnitzer rebbe and were known as scholars. Bălăceana was nicknamed the "Little Land of Israel." Before the construction of the wooden synagogue in 1910, the locals prayed in a private house. There was also a mikveh and a traditional heder. The dead were buried in the Suceava community cemetery, 10 km away.

Between the two world wars a branch of the Mizrahi Zionist organization and a branch of Agudat Israel were active in Bălăceana.

According to the 1930 census, there were 234 Jews in Bălăceana which constituted 5% of the total population.

 

The Holocaust period

The rise to power of the Goga-Cuza government in December 1937 led to the enactment and implementation of official anti-Semitic policies in Romania.

In September 1940, a government headed by General Ion Antonescu was formed in Romania. This government included the Iron Guard Party - a nationalist party that advocated violent anti-Semitism. Ion Antonescu's government changed Romania's foreign policy and Romania joined the alliance between Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. This government increased the persecution of the Jews and led a regime of terror against them.

The situation of the Jews soon deteriorated. Their lands, cattle and grain stocks were confiscated. Most of the Jews left the village destitute. In January 1941, the last of the Jews moved to Suceava, after being tortured by the Iron Guard and their property looted.

In June 1941 Romania joined the war against the Soviet Union. In the fall of 1941, the Jews of Bălăceana along with the Jews of Suceava were deported to Transnistria.

At the end of the war only a few returned.

Romania

România

A country in eastern Europe, member of the European Union (EU)

21st Century

Estimated Jewish population in 2018: 9,000 out of 19,500,000.  Before the Holocaust Romania was home to the second largest Jewish community in Europe, and the fourth largest in the world, after USSR, USA, and Poland. Main Jewish organization:

Federaţia Comunităţilor Evreieşti Din România - Federation of Jewish Communities in Romania
Str. Sf. Vineri nr. 9-11 sector 3, Bucuresti, Romania
Phone: 021-315.50.90
Fax: 021-313.10.28
Email: secretariat@fcer.ro
Website: www.jewishfed.ro

Tombstone dated 1873 in the Jewish cemetery in Gura-Humorului, Bukovina, Rumania, 1974
Halutzim cutting wood in Gura-Humorului, Bukovina, Romania 1935
The town of Gura-Humorului in Bucovina, Romania, 1920-1930
Tombstone dated 1873 in the Jewish cemetery
in Gura-Humorului, Bukovina, Rumania, 1974
Photo: Lajos Erdelyi, Hungary
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot, Lajos Erdelyi collection)
Halutzim cutting wood in Gura-Humorului,
Bukovina, Romania, 1935
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot,
Bequest of the late David Vinitzki, Israel)
The Town of Gura-Humorului in Bucovina,
Romania, 1920-1930
One third of its population was Jewish
(The Oster Visual Documentation Center, Beit Hatfutsot
courtesy of Zusia Efron, Jerusalem)