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רוצה לעזור לנו לשפר את התוכן? אפשר לשלוח הצעות

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חובר ע"י חוקרים של אנו מוזיאון העם היהודי
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פריטים קשורים:
Pap, Karoly (1897-1945), author born in Sopron, Hungary (then part of Austria-Hungary), where his father was the rabbi of the Neolog Miksa Pollak community. Pap was an officer in the Austro-Hungarian army during World War I and was decorated for bravery. After demobilization, he joined Bela Kun's October Revolution and became a Hungarian Red Army commander. On the collapse of the revolution he was arrested, reduced to the ranks, and condemned to 18 months' imprisonment. After his release he left the country until 1925. Then he returned, settled in Budapest and began writing poetry and stories. He soon became known as a short story writer, but wishing to remain independent, he refused to take any employment.

Pap's first novel, "Megszabaditottal a halaltol" ("Thou Hast Delivered Me from Death," 1932), which dealt with a popular Jewish Messiah in the time of Jesus, was enthusiastically received by liberal and radical writers, notably the great Hungarian author, Zsigmond Moritz, who gave him much encouragement. The character of Jesus and the period in which he lived recur constantly in Pap's writings, not because of any attraction to Christianity but because, in his opinion, this "classical" period of Judaism retained traces of the Divinity, and at the same time presented social contrasts and gave Jews the taste of suffering. His great autobiographical novel "Azarel" (1937), which portrayed his father's house through the eyes of a child, aroused indignation among Jewish readers because of the cruel frankness of the description. In his sensational essay, "Zsido sebek es bunok" ("Jewish Wounds and Sins", 1935), Pap made a thorough and candid analysis of his Jewish and non-Jewish social surroundings. He traced the history of the Jews, particularly of Hungarian Jewry, in order to expose conventional lies, especially those concerning emancipation. He found only one solution to the Jewish problem: acceptance of the fate of a national minority. He himself was fanatically attached to all aspects of Jewish life and was uncompromising in his loyalty.

During World War II, The Budapest Jewish Theatre performed two biblical plays by Pap: "Bathsheba" (1940) and "Moses" (1944). In May 1944 he was sent to a labor camp. From there he refused to escape and was deported to Buchenwald, and is presumed to have been murdered in Bergen-Belsen. Three works which appeared posthumously were "A szuzesseg fatylai" ("The Vials of Chastity,"1945), "A Hoszobor" ("The Snow Statue." 1954) and "B varosaban tortent" ("It Happened in the City B," 2 vols., 1964).
מנהיג ציוני, סופר

נולד והתחנך בברנו, מוראביה (היום בצ'כיה), שם היה ממארגני "וריטאס", ארגון סטודנטים יהודים, וממייסדי התנועה הציונית בבוהמיה ובמוראביה.

אבלס הצטרף לחוגם של הציונים ברטולד פייבל ורוברט שטריקר. כשסיים את לימודיו באוניברסיטת וינה, עבד כיועץ משפטי בחברת הרכבות האוסטרית. הוא נמשך לכתיבה ועבר לתחום העיתונאות. אבלס היה מעורכי העיתון הציוני "וולט" ו"יודישה צייטונג", כתב מאמרים לעיתון "יידישה נציונל צייטונג" ולעיתונים גרמניים נוספים. יחד עם רוברט שטריקר יסד יומון ציוני ששמו "וינר מורגנצייטונג". בשנת 1926 נתמנה לשליח קרן היסוד, והרצה ברחבי מערב אירופה. משנת 1930 כיהן כמנהל קרן היסוד באמסטרדם.

מיצירותיו החשובות: Die Genesung, שירה (1920), "ביקור בארץ ישראל, תיאור של ביקורו הראשון (1926), ו"עשר יהודיות", על נשים יהודיות נודעות.

בשנות השואה היה אבלס אסיר במחנה הריכוז ברגן בלזן. הוא נפטר מתשישות בשנת 1945, זמן קצר אחרי ששוחרר מן המחנה.
Goslar, Hans (1889-1945), journalist, economist and official of Prussian government during the Weimar Republic, born in Hanover, Germany, the son of businessman Gustav Goslar, who had lived in Hanover since 1870. In 1894 the family moved to Berlin, where he joined the Zionist Youth Movement. He studied at the Graduate School in Berlin and became an economist and business journalist. He wrote for several leading business newspapers including the "Norddeutsche" and the "Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung". He later became editor of the economic journal "Plutus". From 1915 Goslar served in the German army and was assigned to the headquarters press department. The following year he became involved in the German administration of Lithuania and became editor of the Lithuanian newspaper "Dabartis". His service in eastern Europe enabled him to meet the Jewish masses in these areas. It changed his religious outlook.

In November 1919 he was named director of the press section of the Prussian government. His responsibilities included the establishment of a press service. He held this position until the overthrow of the republic by the Nazis in 1932. Goslar spoke out against increasing discrimination against Jews in the the Socialist Party and was quick to recognize the dangers of antisemitism. He was one of the leading of the Jewish People's Party. Throughout the period he was active in general Jewish, Zionist and Mizrachi activities. 1925 he was elected to the Prussian State Association of Jewish communities. Between 1928 and 1933 he, as a religious Zionist, was a member of the assembly of representatives of the Jewish community of Berlin. Goslar with his family fled Germany in 1933 and moved to Amsterdam, Holland, where he initially received a pension from the Prussian State and worked with lawyer Franz Ledermann to aid other Jews to leave Nazi Germany. [Ledermann was the father of Anne Frank's girlfriend Susan].

In 1943 Goslar and his immediate family were arrested and sent to the Westerbork concentration camp. In 1944 they were transferred to Bergen Belsen concentration camp. He was died a few days before the liberation, but his daughters survived a death march. They moved first to Switzerland and later emigrated to Israel.

Goslar wrote a number of books on Jewish subjects. In 1919 he published "Die Sexualethik der juedischen Wiedergeburt" in which he urged a return to Jewish family ethics.

Sam E. Bloch (Shmayahu Eliahu) (1924-2018), founder of Beit Hatfutsot and of the American Friends of Beit Hatfutsot, of which he served as national Vice President and Chairman for many years, a resistance fighter during World War II and who devoted his career to preserving the memory of Jewish Holocaust survivors, founder of museums and memorials, born in Iwje, Poland (now in Belarus), the son of a prominent Hebrew-language teacher. Bloch was educated at Tarbuth Hebrew College in Vilnius, Lithuania, and at Bonn University. 

After his father was killed in a mass execution by the Nazis in 1941, Bloch, then 16, along with his mother and younger brother, escaped a Jewish ghetto just before it was liquidated and sought shelter with a family of Polish farmers. They later fled into the countryside, where they hid first with Christian farmers and then in the woods. Bloch made connections with an underground Jewish resistance movement and then he joined the Bielski Partisans, an armed Jewish unit of resistance fighters led by three brothers who operated in the woods of Belarus.  Bloch engaged in sabotage, fought against Nazi forces and collaborators, and helped rescue other Jews.

In 1945, the Bloch family ended up at a displaced-persons camp near the site of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany, Bloch became the youngest member of the camp’s governing committee.

Having married Lilly Czaban, a Holocaust survivor, at the camp in 1949, he immigrated to the USA, settling in New York.  Bloch started working for the World Zionist Organization. He worked there for more than 50 years, eventually becoming director of publications. He edited and published many volumes of Holocaust history, memoirs and poetry.

In 1965, on the 20th anniversary of the liberation of Bergen-Belsen Nazi concentration camp, Bloch organized one of the first major reunions of Jewish survivors of the Holocaust.

Along with other Holocaust survivors, including Josef Rosensaft and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Elie Wiesel, Bloch took a leading role in planning Holocaust memorials and museums. He was a founding member of the International Society for Yad Vashem, the leading Holocaust remembrance organization in Israel, and helped distribute financial support to survivors worldwide.

Bloch served on a commission to create New York’s Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. He was a member of the committees that oversaw the early development of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington and helped create museums devoted to the Holocaust and Jewish history at Bergen-Belsen and in Israel.

Bloch served as president of the American Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors and Their Descendants; president of the World Federation of Bergen-Belsen Survivors Associations; chairman of the Advisory Council of the Foundation for World War II Memorial Sites in Lower Saxony, Germany, and served as a member of its board.

לובלינר, פרדי (1924 - 1942), פעיל בתנועת "בני עקיבא - (בח"ד) בלגיה", נולד בב' בשבט תרפ"ד (8 בינואר 1924) באנטוורפן, בלגיה. אביו, ישראל, ואמו, מריה לבית למברגר, גרו בתחילה באוסטנסטראאט 50, אח"כ באדלינקסטראאט 5 ולבסוף בסטנבוקסטראאט 38, פרדי לובלינר למד בבית הספר התיכון עירוני Athenee Royale, באנטוורפן, בלגיה. הוא היה חלק מרביעיית חברים יחד עם האטי פישר, לוסיאן האוזר (ראה ערך האוזר לוסיין בנפרד) ודו שטרן (ראה ערך שטרן דוד בנפרד). כינויו בין החברים היה "פלופ".

תנועת הנוער "בני עקיבא (בח"ד)" בבלגיה נוסדה בשנת תרצ"ג 1933, והיא תנועת נוער בעלת חשיבות בנוף של יחודי בלגיה בשנים שלפני השואה ובזמן השואה. חברי התנועה היו פעילים גם בשנים 1942-1940, כאשר בלגיה היתה תחת כיבוש נאצי. עם הפסקת הפעילות בסניפים, חברי "בני עקיבא" הצטרפו להכשרה חקלאית בבומל (Bomal) בתקווה שיבוא יום והם יזכו לעלות לארץ ישראל ולחיות שם כחקלאים.

פרדי לובלינר נעצר על ידי הנאצים באנטוורפן ונרשם כאסיר פוליטי בלגי יהודי תחת מספר 118975. הוא נשלח למחנה מעבר בעיר מלין (Malines-Mechelen), בלגיה, משם גורש לאושוויץ ב-4 באפריל 1944 בטרנספורט מס' 24 (Transport XXIV). שמו מופיע במספר 211 ברשימת המגורשים. מאושוויץ הועבר לבוכנוואלד ב-22 בינואר 1945 ומשם לברגן-בלזן ב-13 במרץ 1945, שם נעלמו עקבותיו.

___________________________________________________________________________

המידע פורסם במקור בספר סיפורה של אנדרטה. בני עקיבא -תקוותנו, אנטוורפן, בשואה, בעריכתם של ז'ק ישראל אופן ושלמה האוזר, הוצאה שמים תקשורת, ישראל 2010. נרשם במאגרי המידע של בית התפוצות באדיבות המחברים. 

לנגר, משה (מרכוס) (1919 - 1942), פעיל בתנועת "בני עקיבא - (בח"ד) בלגיה", נולד בט"ז בתמוז תרע"ט (14 ביולי 1919) בוינה, אוסטריה. אביו,  חיים, ואמו, רוזלי לבית קנר, הגיעו לבלגיה, ב-10 במאי 1924, וגרו בפלנטיין מורטוססטראאט 135, אנטוורפן, בלגיה.  למשה היו ארבע אחיות: אוה, ילידת פולין 1910 (נפטרה), ברטה, ילידת אנטוורפן, בלגיה, 1912 (נפטרה באנטוורפן, בלגיה ב-1972), ג'יזל אוגוסטה, ילידת אנטוורפן, בלגיה, 1914 (גורשה לאושביץ-בירקנאו, ניצלה ונפטרה בארה"ב בשנת 2007), הנריאטה, ילידת וינה, אוסטריה 1917 (התגוררה בארה"ב). 

תנועת הנוער "בני עקיבא (בח"ד)" בבלגיה נוסדה בשנת תרצ"ג 1933, והיא תנועת נוער בעלת חשיבות בנוף של יחודי בלגיה בשנים שלפני השואה ובזמן השואה. חברי התנועה היו פעילים גם בשנים 1942-1940, כאשר בלגיה היתה תחת כיבוש נאצי. עם הפסקת הפעילות בסניפים, חברי "בני עקיבא" הצטרפו להכשרה חקלאית בבומל (Bomal) בתקווה שיבוא יום והם יזכו לעלות לארץ ישראל ולחיות שם כחקלאים.

משה לנגר נעצר על ידי הנאצים באנטוורפן, ונשלח למחנה מעבר בעיר מלין (Malines-Mechelen), בלגיה, משם הוא גורש לאושוויץ ב-8 בספטמבר 1942 בטרנספורט מס' 8 (Transport VIII). שמו מופיע במספר 472 ברשימת המגורשים. משם לא חזר.

על פי עדותו של אהרן בוז'יקובסקי, הוא גורש לסוביבור ונספה בקרון בין גרו0-רוזן לבוכנוואלד.

___________________________________________________________________________

המידע פורסם במקור בספר סיפורה של אנדרטה. בני עקיבא -תקוותנו, אנטוורפן, בשואה, בעריכתם של ז'ק ישראל אופן ושלמה האוזר, הוצאה שמים תקשורת, ישראל 2010. נרשם במאגרי המידע של בית התפוצות באדיבות המחברים. 

מנהיג ציוני, סופר

נולד והתחנך בברנו, מוראביה (היום בצ'כיה), שם היה ממארגני "וריטאס", ארגון סטודנטים יהודים, וממייסדי התנועה הציונית בבוהמיה ובמוראביה.

אבלס הצטרף לחוגם של הציונים ברטולד פייבל ורוברט שטריקר. כשסיים את לימודיו באוניברסיטת וינה, עבד כיועץ משפטי בחברת הרכבות האוסטרית. הוא נמשך לכתיבה ועבר לתחום העיתונאות. אבלס היה מעורכי העיתון הציוני "וולט" ו"יודישה צייטונג", כתב מאמרים לעיתון "יידישה נציונל צייטונג" ולעיתונים גרמניים נוספים. יחד עם רוברט שטריקר יסד יומון ציוני ששמו "וינר מורגנצייטונג". בשנת 1926 נתמנה לשליח קרן היסוד, והרצה ברחבי מערב אירופה. משנת 1930 כיהן כמנהל קרן היסוד באמסטרדם.

מיצירותיו החשובות: Die Genesung, שירה (1920), "ביקור בארץ ישראל, תיאור של ביקורו הראשון (1926), ו"עשר יהודיות", על נשים יהודיות נודעות.

בשנות השואה היה אבלס אסיר במחנה הריכוז ברגן בלזן. הוא נפטר מתשישות בשנת 1945, זמן קצר אחרי ששוחרר מן המחנה.
Pap, Karoly (1897-1945), author born in Sopron, Hungary (then part of Austria-Hungary), where his father was the rabbi of the Neolog Miksa Pollak community. Pap was an officer in the Austro-Hungarian army during World War I and was decorated for bravery. After demobilization, he joined Bela Kun's October Revolution and became a Hungarian Red Army commander. On the collapse of the revolution he was arrested, reduced to the ranks, and condemned to 18 months' imprisonment. After his release he left the country until 1925. Then he returned, settled in Budapest and began writing poetry and stories. He soon became known as a short story writer, but wishing to remain independent, he refused to take any employment.

Pap's first novel, "Megszabaditottal a halaltol" ("Thou Hast Delivered Me from Death," 1932), which dealt with a popular Jewish Messiah in the time of Jesus, was enthusiastically received by liberal and radical writers, notably the great Hungarian author, Zsigmond Moritz, who gave him much encouragement. The character of Jesus and the period in which he lived recur constantly in Pap's writings, not because of any attraction to Christianity but because, in his opinion, this "classical" period of Judaism retained traces of the Divinity, and at the same time presented social contrasts and gave Jews the taste of suffering. His great autobiographical novel "Azarel" (1937), which portrayed his father's house through the eyes of a child, aroused indignation among Jewish readers because of the cruel frankness of the description. In his sensational essay, "Zsido sebek es bunok" ("Jewish Wounds and Sins", 1935), Pap made a thorough and candid analysis of his Jewish and non-Jewish social surroundings. He traced the history of the Jews, particularly of Hungarian Jewry, in order to expose conventional lies, especially those concerning emancipation. He found only one solution to the Jewish problem: acceptance of the fate of a national minority. He himself was fanatically attached to all aspects of Jewish life and was uncompromising in his loyalty.

During World War II, The Budapest Jewish Theatre performed two biblical plays by Pap: "Bathsheba" (1940) and "Moses" (1944). In May 1944 he was sent to a labor camp. From there he refused to escape and was deported to Buchenwald, and is presumed to have been murdered in Bergen-Belsen. Three works which appeared posthumously were "A szuzesseg fatylai" ("The Vials of Chastity,"1945), "A Hoszobor" ("The Snow Statue." 1954) and "B varosaban tortent" ("It Happened in the City B," 2 vols., 1964).
Goslar, Hans (1889-1945), journalist, economist and official of Prussian government during the Weimar Republic, born in Hanover, Germany, the son of businessman Gustav Goslar, who had lived in Hanover since 1870. In 1894 the family moved to Berlin, where he joined the Zionist Youth Movement. He studied at the Graduate School in Berlin and became an economist and business journalist. He wrote for several leading business newspapers including the "Norddeutsche" and the "Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung". He later became editor of the economic journal "Plutus". From 1915 Goslar served in the German army and was assigned to the headquarters press department. The following year he became involved in the German administration of Lithuania and became editor of the Lithuanian newspaper "Dabartis". His service in eastern Europe enabled him to meet the Jewish masses in these areas. It changed his religious outlook.

In November 1919 he was named director of the press section of the Prussian government. His responsibilities included the establishment of a press service. He held this position until the overthrow of the republic by the Nazis in 1932. Goslar spoke out against increasing discrimination against Jews in the the Socialist Party and was quick to recognize the dangers of antisemitism. He was one of the leading of the Jewish People's Party. Throughout the period he was active in general Jewish, Zionist and Mizrachi activities. 1925 he was elected to the Prussian State Association of Jewish communities. Between 1928 and 1933 he, as a religious Zionist, was a member of the assembly of representatives of the Jewish community of Berlin. Goslar with his family fled Germany in 1933 and moved to Amsterdam, Holland, where he initially received a pension from the Prussian State and worked with lawyer Franz Ledermann to aid other Jews to leave Nazi Germany. [Ledermann was the father of Anne Frank's girlfriend Susan].

In 1943 Goslar and his immediate family were arrested and sent to the Westerbork concentration camp. In 1944 they were transferred to Bergen Belsen concentration camp. He was died a few days before the liberation, but his daughters survived a death march. They moved first to Switzerland and later emigrated to Israel.

Goslar wrote a number of books on Jewish subjects. In 1919 he published "Die Sexualethik der juedischen Wiedergeburt" in which he urged a return to Jewish family ethics.

Anne (Annelies Marie) Frank (1929-1945), author, born in  Frankfurt on Main, Germany. She was taken with her family to Amsterdam after the Nazis seized power in 1933. After Holland was invaded in 1940, her father prepared for the eventuality of hiding and in July 1942 the family and a few friends moved into the attic of the vacant annex of her father's business premises where they were hidden by four of her father's employees. For the next two years they remained in the attic and Anne kept a diary of their life. In Aug. 1944, after being tipped off, the Germans arrested them all and send them to death camps. Anne and her sister were sent to Bergen-Belsen Nazi concentration camp where they died of typhus in March 1945. Her diary was discovered by one of those who had hidden them and given to her father who survived the war. First published in 1947, it became a recognized world classic translated into numerous languages. The house in which they hid, known as the Anne Frank House, became a center of pilgrimage for visitors from all parts of the world and houses the Anne Frank Foundation established to fight anti-Semitism and racism.

Wadersloh

A municipality in the district of Warendorf in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

First Jewish presence: 1846; peak Jewish population: unknown; Jewish population in 1933: unknown

Very little is known about this small Jewish community. Comprised in 1846 of five families, the community joined the Oelde regional synagogue association in 1853. Wadersloh’s Jewish cemetery, located in An der Kirksteige, was consecrated in 1831. Local Jews held their religious services in a series of private residences: one of these homes, used in and around the year 1905, was the Hoelsch family home at 3 Ueberwasserstrasse; another, used some time later, was located at 9 Ueberwasserstrasse. During the pogroms of November 1938, SA men broke into and devastated the prayer room building to such an extent that it had to be demolished. Six Wadersloh Jews are known to have been deported to Riga and Bergen-Belsen Nazi concentration camp, where they perished. Today, the synagogue site accommodates an inn; a memorial plate commemorates the former prayer room.

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This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.

במאגרי המידע הפתוחים
גניאולוגיה יהודית
שמות משפחה
קהילות יהודיות
תיעוד חזותי
מרכז המוזיקה היהודית
מקום
אA
אA
אA
רוצה לעזור לנו לשפר את התוכן? אפשר לשלוח הצעות
קהילת יהודי ברגן בלזן
חובר ע"י חוקרים של אנו מוזיאון העם היהודי

ואדרסלוה

Wadersloh

A municipality in the district of Warendorf in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

First Jewish presence: 1846; peak Jewish population: unknown; Jewish population in 1933: unknown

Very little is known about this small Jewish community. Comprised in 1846 of five families, the community joined the Oelde regional synagogue association in 1853. Wadersloh’s Jewish cemetery, located in An der Kirksteige, was consecrated in 1831. Local Jews held their religious services in a series of private residences: one of these homes, used in and around the year 1905, was the Hoelsch family home at 3 Ueberwasserstrasse; another, used some time later, was located at 9 Ueberwasserstrasse. During the pogroms of November 1938, SA men broke into and devastated the prayer room building to such an extent that it had to be demolished. Six Wadersloh Jews are known to have been deported to Riga and Bergen-Belsen Nazi concentration camp, where they perished. Today, the synagogue site accommodates an inn; a memorial plate commemorates the former prayer room.

--------------------------------------------

This entry was originally published on Beit Ashkenaz - Destroyed German Synagogues and Communities website and contributed to the Database of the Museum of the Jewish People courtesy of Beit Ashkenaz.

אנה פרנק
לנגר, משה (מרכוס)
לובלינר, פרדי
Sam E. Bloch
גוסלר, הנס
דה יונג, סלומון (סלו)
אבלס, אוטו
פאפ, קארוי

Anne (Annelies Marie) Frank (1929-1945), author, born in  Frankfurt on Main, Germany. She was taken with her family to Amsterdam after the Nazis seized power in 1933. After Holland was invaded in 1940, her father prepared for the eventuality of hiding and in July 1942 the family and a few friends moved into the attic of the vacant annex of her father's business premises where they were hidden by four of her father's employees. For the next two years they remained in the attic and Anne kept a diary of their life. In Aug. 1944, after being tipped off, the Germans arrested them all and send them to death camps. Anne and her sister were sent to Bergen-Belsen Nazi concentration camp where they died of typhus in March 1945. Her diary was discovered by one of those who had hidden them and given to her father who survived the war. First published in 1947, it became a recognized world classic translated into numerous languages. The house in which they hid, known as the Anne Frank House, became a center of pilgrimage for visitors from all parts of the world and houses the Anne Frank Foundation established to fight anti-Semitism and racism.

לנגר, משה (מרכוס) (1919 - 1942), פעיל בתנועת "בני עקיבא - (בח"ד) בלגיה", נולד בט"ז בתמוז תרע"ט (14 ביולי 1919) בוינה, אוסטריה. אביו,  חיים, ואמו, רוזלי לבית קנר, הגיעו לבלגיה, ב-10 במאי 1924, וגרו בפלנטיין מורטוססטראאט 135, אנטוורפן, בלגיה.  למשה היו ארבע אחיות: אוה, ילידת פולין 1910 (נפטרה), ברטה, ילידת אנטוורפן, בלגיה, 1912 (נפטרה באנטוורפן, בלגיה ב-1972), ג'יזל אוגוסטה, ילידת אנטוורפן, בלגיה, 1914 (גורשה לאושביץ-בירקנאו, ניצלה ונפטרה בארה"ב בשנת 2007), הנריאטה, ילידת וינה, אוסטריה 1917 (התגוררה בארה"ב). 

תנועת הנוער "בני עקיבא (בח"ד)" בבלגיה נוסדה בשנת תרצ"ג 1933, והיא תנועת נוער בעלת חשיבות בנוף של יחודי בלגיה בשנים שלפני השואה ובזמן השואה. חברי התנועה היו פעילים גם בשנים 1942-1940, כאשר בלגיה היתה תחת כיבוש נאצי. עם הפסקת הפעילות בסניפים, חברי "בני עקיבא" הצטרפו להכשרה חקלאית בבומל (Bomal) בתקווה שיבוא יום והם יזכו לעלות לארץ ישראל ולחיות שם כחקלאים.

משה לנגר נעצר על ידי הנאצים באנטוורפן, ונשלח למחנה מעבר בעיר מלין (Malines-Mechelen), בלגיה, משם הוא גורש לאושוויץ ב-8 בספטמבר 1942 בטרנספורט מס' 8 (Transport VIII). שמו מופיע במספר 472 ברשימת המגורשים. משם לא חזר.

על פי עדותו של אהרן בוז'יקובסקי, הוא גורש לסוביבור ונספה בקרון בין גרו0-רוזן לבוכנוואלד.

___________________________________________________________________________

המידע פורסם במקור בספר סיפורה של אנדרטה. בני עקיבא -תקוותנו, אנטוורפן, בשואה, בעריכתם של ז'ק ישראל אופן ושלמה האוזר, הוצאה שמים תקשורת, ישראל 2010. נרשם במאגרי המידע של בית התפוצות באדיבות המחברים. 

לובלינר, פרדי (1924 - 1942), פעיל בתנועת "בני עקיבא - (בח"ד) בלגיה", נולד בב' בשבט תרפ"ד (8 בינואר 1924) באנטוורפן, בלגיה. אביו, ישראל, ואמו, מריה לבית למברגר, גרו בתחילה באוסטנסטראאט 50, אח"כ באדלינקסטראאט 5 ולבסוף בסטנבוקסטראאט 38, פרדי לובלינר למד בבית הספר התיכון עירוני Athenee Royale, באנטוורפן, בלגיה. הוא היה חלק מרביעיית חברים יחד עם האטי פישר, לוסיאן האוזר (ראה ערך האוזר לוסיין בנפרד) ודו שטרן (ראה ערך שטרן דוד בנפרד). כינויו בין החברים היה "פלופ".

תנועת הנוער "בני עקיבא (בח"ד)" בבלגיה נוסדה בשנת תרצ"ג 1933, והיא תנועת נוער בעלת חשיבות בנוף של יחודי בלגיה בשנים שלפני השואה ובזמן השואה. חברי התנועה היו פעילים גם בשנים 1942-1940, כאשר בלגיה היתה תחת כיבוש נאצי. עם הפסקת הפעילות בסניפים, חברי "בני עקיבא" הצטרפו להכשרה חקלאית בבומל (Bomal) בתקווה שיבוא יום והם יזכו לעלות לארץ ישראל ולחיות שם כחקלאים.

פרדי לובלינר נעצר על ידי הנאצים באנטוורפן ונרשם כאסיר פוליטי בלגי יהודי תחת מספר 118975. הוא נשלח למחנה מעבר בעיר מלין (Malines-Mechelen), בלגיה, משם גורש לאושוויץ ב-4 באפריל 1944 בטרנספורט מס' 24 (Transport XXIV). שמו מופיע במספר 211 ברשימת המגורשים. מאושוויץ הועבר לבוכנוואלד ב-22 בינואר 1945 ומשם לברגן-בלזן ב-13 במרץ 1945, שם נעלמו עקבותיו.

___________________________________________________________________________

המידע פורסם במקור בספר סיפורה של אנדרטה. בני עקיבא -תקוותנו, אנטוורפן, בשואה, בעריכתם של ז'ק ישראל אופן ושלמה האוזר, הוצאה שמים תקשורת, ישראל 2010. נרשם במאגרי המידע של בית התפוצות באדיבות המחברים. 

Sam E. Bloch (Shmayahu Eliahu) (1924-2018), founder of Beit Hatfutsot and of the American Friends of Beit Hatfutsot, of which he served as national Vice President and Chairman for many years, a resistance fighter during World War II and who devoted his career to preserving the memory of Jewish Holocaust survivors, founder of museums and memorials, born in Iwje, Poland (now in Belarus), the son of a prominent Hebrew-language teacher. Bloch was educated at Tarbuth Hebrew College in Vilnius, Lithuania, and at Bonn University. 

After his father was killed in a mass execution by the Nazis in 1941, Bloch, then 16, along with his mother and younger brother, escaped a Jewish ghetto just before it was liquidated and sought shelter with a family of Polish farmers. They later fled into the countryside, where they hid first with Christian farmers and then in the woods. Bloch made connections with an underground Jewish resistance movement and then he joined the Bielski Partisans, an armed Jewish unit of resistance fighters led by three brothers who operated in the woods of Belarus.  Bloch engaged in sabotage, fought against Nazi forces and collaborators, and helped rescue other Jews.

In 1945, the Bloch family ended up at a displaced-persons camp near the site of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany, Bloch became the youngest member of the camp’s governing committee.

Having married Lilly Czaban, a Holocaust survivor, at the camp in 1949, he immigrated to the USA, settling in New York.  Bloch started working for the World Zionist Organization. He worked there for more than 50 years, eventually becoming director of publications. He edited and published many volumes of Holocaust history, memoirs and poetry.

In 1965, on the 20th anniversary of the liberation of Bergen-Belsen Nazi concentration camp, Bloch organized one of the first major reunions of Jewish survivors of the Holocaust.

Along with other Holocaust survivors, including Josef Rosensaft and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Elie Wiesel, Bloch took a leading role in planning Holocaust memorials and museums. He was a founding member of the International Society for Yad Vashem, the leading Holocaust remembrance organization in Israel, and helped distribute financial support to survivors worldwide.

Bloch served on a commission to create New York’s Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. He was a member of the committees that oversaw the early development of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington and helped create museums devoted to the Holocaust and Jewish history at Bergen-Belsen and in Israel.

Bloch served as president of the American Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors and Their Descendants; president of the World Federation of Bergen-Belsen Survivors Associations; chairman of the Advisory Council of the Foundation for World War II Memorial Sites in Lower Saxony, Germany, and served as a member of its board.

Goslar, Hans (1889-1945), journalist, economist and official of Prussian government during the Weimar Republic, born in Hanover, Germany, the son of businessman Gustav Goslar, who had lived in Hanover since 1870. In 1894 the family moved to Berlin, where he joined the Zionist Youth Movement. He studied at the Graduate School in Berlin and became an economist and business journalist. He wrote for several leading business newspapers including the "Norddeutsche" and the "Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung". He later became editor of the economic journal "Plutus". From 1915 Goslar served in the German army and was assigned to the headquarters press department. The following year he became involved in the German administration of Lithuania and became editor of the Lithuanian newspaper "Dabartis". His service in eastern Europe enabled him to meet the Jewish masses in these areas. It changed his religious outlook.

In November 1919 he was named director of the press section of the Prussian government. His responsibilities included the establishment of a press service. He held this position until the overthrow of the republic by the Nazis in 1932. Goslar spoke out against increasing discrimination against Jews in the the Socialist Party and was quick to recognize the dangers of antisemitism. He was one of the leading of the Jewish People's Party. Throughout the period he was active in general Jewish, Zionist and Mizrachi activities. 1925 he was elected to the Prussian State Association of Jewish communities. Between 1928 and 1933 he, as a religious Zionist, was a member of the assembly of representatives of the Jewish community of Berlin. Goslar with his family fled Germany in 1933 and moved to Amsterdam, Holland, where he initially received a pension from the Prussian State and worked with lawyer Franz Ledermann to aid other Jews to leave Nazi Germany. [Ledermann was the father of Anne Frank's girlfriend Susan].

In 1943 Goslar and his immediate family were arrested and sent to the Westerbork concentration camp. In 1944 they were transferred to Bergen Belsen concentration camp. He was died a few days before the liberation, but his daughters survived a death march. They moved first to Switzerland and later emigrated to Israel.

Goslar wrote a number of books on Jewish subjects. In 1919 he published "Die Sexualethik der juedischen Wiedergeburt" in which he urged a return to Jewish family ethics.
מנהיג ציוני, סופר

נולד והתחנך בברנו, מוראביה (היום בצ'כיה), שם היה ממארגני "וריטאס", ארגון סטודנטים יהודים, וממייסדי התנועה הציונית בבוהמיה ובמוראביה.

אבלס הצטרף לחוגם של הציונים ברטולד פייבל ורוברט שטריקר. כשסיים את לימודיו באוניברסיטת וינה, עבד כיועץ משפטי בחברת הרכבות האוסטרית. הוא נמשך לכתיבה ועבר לתחום העיתונאות. אבלס היה מעורכי העיתון הציוני "וולט" ו"יודישה צייטונג", כתב מאמרים לעיתון "יידישה נציונל צייטונג" ולעיתונים גרמניים נוספים. יחד עם רוברט שטריקר יסד יומון ציוני ששמו "וינר מורגנצייטונג". בשנת 1926 נתמנה לשליח קרן היסוד, והרצה ברחבי מערב אירופה. משנת 1930 כיהן כמנהל קרן היסוד באמסטרדם.

מיצירותיו החשובות: Die Genesung, שירה (1920), "ביקור בארץ ישראל, תיאור של ביקורו הראשון (1926), ו"עשר יהודיות", על נשים יהודיות נודעות.

בשנות השואה היה אבלס אסיר במחנה הריכוז ברגן בלזן. הוא נפטר מתשישות בשנת 1945, זמן קצר אחרי ששוחרר מן המחנה.
Pap, Karoly (1897-1945), author born in Sopron, Hungary (then part of Austria-Hungary), where his father was the rabbi of the Neolog Miksa Pollak community. Pap was an officer in the Austro-Hungarian army during World War I and was decorated for bravery. After demobilization, he joined Bela Kun's October Revolution and became a Hungarian Red Army commander. On the collapse of the revolution he was arrested, reduced to the ranks, and condemned to 18 months' imprisonment. After his release he left the country until 1925. Then he returned, settled in Budapest and began writing poetry and stories. He soon became known as a short story writer, but wishing to remain independent, he refused to take any employment.

Pap's first novel, "Megszabaditottal a halaltol" ("Thou Hast Delivered Me from Death," 1932), which dealt with a popular Jewish Messiah in the time of Jesus, was enthusiastically received by liberal and radical writers, notably the great Hungarian author, Zsigmond Moritz, who gave him much encouragement. The character of Jesus and the period in which he lived recur constantly in Pap's writings, not because of any attraction to Christianity but because, in his opinion, this "classical" period of Judaism retained traces of the Divinity, and at the same time presented social contrasts and gave Jews the taste of suffering. His great autobiographical novel "Azarel" (1937), which portrayed his father's house through the eyes of a child, aroused indignation among Jewish readers because of the cruel frankness of the description. In his sensational essay, "Zsido sebek es bunok" ("Jewish Wounds and Sins", 1935), Pap made a thorough and candid analysis of his Jewish and non-Jewish social surroundings. He traced the history of the Jews, particularly of Hungarian Jewry, in order to expose conventional lies, especially those concerning emancipation. He found only one solution to the Jewish problem: acceptance of the fate of a national minority. He himself was fanatically attached to all aspects of Jewish life and was uncompromising in his loyalty.

During World War II, The Budapest Jewish Theatre performed two biblical plays by Pap: "Bathsheba" (1940) and "Moses" (1944). In May 1944 he was sent to a labor camp. From there he refused to escape and was deported to Buchenwald, and is presumed to have been murdered in Bergen-Belsen. Three works which appeared posthumously were "A szuzesseg fatylai" ("The Vials of Chastity,"1945), "A Hoszobor" ("The Snow Statue." 1954) and "B varosaban tortent" ("It Happened in the City B," 2 vols., 1964).
לנגר, משה (מרכוס)

לנגר, משה (מרכוס) (1919 - 1942), פעיל בתנועת "בני עקיבא - (בח"ד) בלגיה", נולד בט"ז בתמוז תרע"ט (14 ביולי 1919) בוינה, אוסטריה. אביו,  חיים, ואמו, רוזלי לבית קנר, הגיעו לבלגיה, ב-10 במאי 1924, וגרו בפלנטיין מורטוססטראאט 135, אנטוורפן, בלגיה.  למשה היו ארבע אחיות: אוה, ילידת פולין 1910 (נפטרה), ברטה, ילידת אנטוורפן, בלגיה, 1912 (נפטרה באנטוורפן, בלגיה ב-1972), ג'יזל אוגוסטה, ילידת אנטוורפן, בלגיה, 1914 (גורשה לאושביץ-בירקנאו, ניצלה ונפטרה בארה"ב בשנת 2007), הנריאטה, ילידת וינה, אוסטריה 1917 (התגוררה בארה"ב). 

תנועת הנוער "בני עקיבא (בח"ד)" בבלגיה נוסדה בשנת תרצ"ג 1933, והיא תנועת נוער בעלת חשיבות בנוף של יחודי בלגיה בשנים שלפני השואה ובזמן השואה. חברי התנועה היו פעילים גם בשנים 1942-1940, כאשר בלגיה היתה תחת כיבוש נאצי. עם הפסקת הפעילות בסניפים, חברי "בני עקיבא" הצטרפו להכשרה חקלאית בבומל (Bomal) בתקווה שיבוא יום והם יזכו לעלות לארץ ישראל ולחיות שם כחקלאים.

משה לנגר נעצר על ידי הנאצים באנטוורפן, ונשלח למחנה מעבר בעיר מלין (Malines-Mechelen), בלגיה, משם הוא גורש לאושוויץ ב-8 בספטמבר 1942 בטרנספורט מס' 8 (Transport VIII). שמו מופיע במספר 472 ברשימת המגורשים. משם לא חזר.

על פי עדותו של אהרן בוז'יקובסקי, הוא גורש לסוביבור ונספה בקרון בין גרו0-רוזן לבוכנוואלד.

___________________________________________________________________________

המידע פורסם במקור בספר סיפורה של אנדרטה. בני עקיבא -תקוותנו, אנטוורפן, בשואה, בעריכתם של ז'ק ישראל אופן ושלמה האוזר, הוצאה שמים תקשורת, ישראל 2010. נרשם במאגרי המידע של בית התפוצות באדיבות המחברים. 

לובלינר, פרדי

לובלינר, פרדי (1924 - 1942), פעיל בתנועת "בני עקיבא - (בח"ד) בלגיה", נולד בב' בשבט תרפ"ד (8 בינואר 1924) באנטוורפן, בלגיה. אביו, ישראל, ואמו, מריה לבית למברגר, גרו בתחילה באוסטנסטראאט 50, אח"כ באדלינקסטראאט 5 ולבסוף בסטנבוקסטראאט 38, פרדי לובלינר למד בבית הספר התיכון עירוני Athenee Royale, באנטוורפן, בלגיה. הוא היה חלק מרביעיית חברים יחד עם האטי פישר, לוסיאן האוזר (ראה ערך האוזר לוסיין בנפרד) ודו שטרן (ראה ערך שטרן דוד בנפרד). כינויו בין החברים היה "פלופ".

תנועת הנוער "בני עקיבא (בח"ד)" בבלגיה נוסדה בשנת תרצ"ג 1933, והיא תנועת נוער בעלת חשיבות בנוף של יחודי בלגיה בשנים שלפני השואה ובזמן השואה. חברי התנועה היו פעילים גם בשנים 1942-1940, כאשר בלגיה היתה תחת כיבוש נאצי. עם הפסקת הפעילות בסניפים, חברי "בני עקיבא" הצטרפו להכשרה חקלאית בבומל (Bomal) בתקווה שיבוא יום והם יזכו לעלות לארץ ישראל ולחיות שם כחקלאים.

פרדי לובלינר נעצר על ידי הנאצים באנטוורפן ונרשם כאסיר פוליטי בלגי יהודי תחת מספר 118975. הוא נשלח למחנה מעבר בעיר מלין (Malines-Mechelen), בלגיה, משם גורש לאושוויץ ב-4 באפריל 1944 בטרנספורט מס' 24 (Transport XXIV). שמו מופיע במספר 211 ברשימת המגורשים. מאושוויץ הועבר לבוכנוואלד ב-22 בינואר 1945 ומשם לברגן-בלזן ב-13 במרץ 1945, שם נעלמו עקבותיו.

___________________________________________________________________________

המידע פורסם במקור בספר סיפורה של אנדרטה. בני עקיבא -תקוותנו, אנטוורפן, בשואה, בעריכתם של ז'ק ישראל אופן ושלמה האוזר, הוצאה שמים תקשורת, ישראל 2010. נרשם במאגרי המידע של בית התפוצות באדיבות המחברים. 

גוסלר, הנס
דה יונג, סלומון (סלו)
אבלס, אוטו
פאפ, קארוי
Goslar, Hans (1889-1945), journalist, economist and official of Prussian government during the Weimar Republic, born in Hanover, Germany, the son of businessman Gustav Goslar, who had lived in Hanover since 1870. In 1894 the family moved to Berlin, where he joined the Zionist Youth Movement. He studied at the Graduate School in Berlin and became an economist and business journalist. He wrote for several leading business newspapers including the "Norddeutsche" and the "Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung". He later became editor of the economic journal "Plutus". From 1915 Goslar served in the German army and was assigned to the headquarters press department. The following year he became involved in the German administration of Lithuania and became editor of the Lithuanian newspaper "Dabartis". His service in eastern Europe enabled him to meet the Jewish masses in these areas. It changed his religious outlook.

In November 1919 he was named director of the press section of the Prussian government. His responsibilities included the establishment of a press service. He held this position until the overthrow of the republic by the Nazis in 1932. Goslar spoke out against increasing discrimination against Jews in the the Socialist Party and was quick to recognize the dangers of antisemitism. He was one of the leading of the Jewish People's Party. Throughout the period he was active in general Jewish, Zionist and Mizrachi activities. 1925 he was elected to the Prussian State Association of Jewish communities. Between 1928 and 1933 he, as a religious Zionist, was a member of the assembly of representatives of the Jewish community of Berlin. Goslar with his family fled Germany in 1933 and moved to Amsterdam, Holland, where he initially received a pension from the Prussian State and worked with lawyer Franz Ledermann to aid other Jews to leave Nazi Germany. [Ledermann was the father of Anne Frank's girlfriend Susan].

In 1943 Goslar and his immediate family were arrested and sent to the Westerbork concentration camp. In 1944 they were transferred to Bergen Belsen concentration camp. He was died a few days before the liberation, but his daughters survived a death march. They moved first to Switzerland and later emigrated to Israel.

Goslar wrote a number of books on Jewish subjects. In 1919 he published "Die Sexualethik der juedischen Wiedergeburt" in which he urged a return to Jewish family ethics.
מנהיג ציוני, סופר

נולד והתחנך בברנו, מוראביה (היום בצ'כיה), שם היה ממארגני "וריטאס", ארגון סטודנטים יהודים, וממייסדי התנועה הציונית בבוהמיה ובמוראביה.

אבלס הצטרף לחוגם של הציונים ברטולד פייבל ורוברט שטריקר. כשסיים את לימודיו באוניברסיטת וינה, עבד כיועץ משפטי בחברת הרכבות האוסטרית. הוא נמשך לכתיבה ועבר לתחום העיתונאות. אבלס היה מעורכי העיתון הציוני "וולט" ו"יודישה צייטונג", כתב מאמרים לעיתון "יידישה נציונל צייטונג" ולעיתונים גרמניים נוספים. יחד עם רוברט שטריקר יסד יומון ציוני ששמו "וינר מורגנצייטונג". בשנת 1926 נתמנה לשליח קרן היסוד, והרצה ברחבי מערב אירופה. משנת 1930 כיהן כמנהל קרן היסוד באמסטרדם.

מיצירותיו החשובות: Die Genesung, שירה (1920), "ביקור בארץ ישראל, תיאור של ביקורו הראשון (1926), ו"עשר יהודיות", על נשים יהודיות נודעות.

בשנות השואה היה אבלס אסיר במחנה הריכוז ברגן בלזן. הוא נפטר מתשישות בשנת 1945, זמן קצר אחרי ששוחרר מן המחנה.
Pap, Karoly (1897-1945), author born in Sopron, Hungary (then part of Austria-Hungary), where his father was the rabbi of the Neolog Miksa Pollak community. Pap was an officer in the Austro-Hungarian army during World War I and was decorated for bravery. After demobilization, he joined Bela Kun's October Revolution and became a Hungarian Red Army commander. On the collapse of the revolution he was arrested, reduced to the ranks, and condemned to 18 months' imprisonment. After his release he left the country until 1925. Then he returned, settled in Budapest and began writing poetry and stories. He soon became known as a short story writer, but wishing to remain independent, he refused to take any employment.

Pap's first novel, "Megszabaditottal a halaltol" ("Thou Hast Delivered Me from Death," 1932), which dealt with a popular Jewish Messiah in the time of Jesus, was enthusiastically received by liberal and radical writers, notably the great Hungarian author, Zsigmond Moritz, who gave him much encouragement. The character of Jesus and the period in which he lived recur constantly in Pap's writings, not because of any attraction to Christianity but because, in his opinion, this "classical" period of Judaism retained traces of the Divinity, and at the same time presented social contrasts and gave Jews the taste of suffering. His great autobiographical novel "Azarel" (1937), which portrayed his father's house through the eyes of a child, aroused indignation among Jewish readers because of the cruel frankness of the description. In his sensational essay, "Zsido sebek es bunok" ("Jewish Wounds and Sins", 1935), Pap made a thorough and candid analysis of his Jewish and non-Jewish social surroundings. He traced the history of the Jews, particularly of Hungarian Jewry, in order to expose conventional lies, especially those concerning emancipation. He found only one solution to the Jewish problem: acceptance of the fate of a national minority. He himself was fanatically attached to all aspects of Jewish life and was uncompromising in his loyalty.

During World War II, The Budapest Jewish Theatre performed two biblical plays by Pap: "Bathsheba" (1940) and "Moses" (1944). In May 1944 he was sent to a labor camp. From there he refused to escape and was deported to Buchenwald, and is presumed to have been murdered in Bergen-Belsen. Three works which appeared posthumously were "A szuzesseg fatylai" ("The Vials of Chastity,"1945), "A Hoszobor" ("The Snow Statue." 1954) and "B varosaban tortent" ("It Happened in the City B," 2 vols., 1964).
גוסלר, הנס
Goslar, Hans (1889-1945), journalist, economist and official of Prussian government during the Weimar Republic, born in Hanover, Germany, the son of businessman Gustav Goslar, who had lived in Hanover since 1870. In 1894 the family moved to Berlin, where he joined the Zionist Youth Movement. He studied at the Graduate School in Berlin and became an economist and business journalist. He wrote for several leading business newspapers including the "Norddeutsche" and the "Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung". He later became editor of the economic journal "Plutus". From 1915 Goslar served in the German army and was assigned to the headquarters press department. The following year he became involved in the German administration of Lithuania and became editor of the Lithuanian newspaper "Dabartis". His service in eastern Europe enabled him to meet the Jewish masses in these areas. It changed his religious outlook.

In November 1919 he was named director of the press section of the Prussian government. His responsibilities included the establishment of a press service. He held this position until the overthrow of the republic by the Nazis in 1932. Goslar spoke out against increasing discrimination against Jews in the the Socialist Party and was quick to recognize the dangers of antisemitism. He was one of the leading of the Jewish People's Party. Throughout the period he was active in general Jewish, Zionist and Mizrachi activities. 1925 he was elected to the Prussian State Association of Jewish communities. Between 1928 and 1933 he, as a religious Zionist, was a member of the assembly of representatives of the Jewish community of Berlin. Goslar with his family fled Germany in 1933 and moved to Amsterdam, Holland, where he initially received a pension from the Prussian State and worked with lawyer Franz Ledermann to aid other Jews to leave Nazi Germany. [Ledermann was the father of Anne Frank's girlfriend Susan].

In 1943 Goslar and his immediate family were arrested and sent to the Westerbork concentration camp. In 1944 they were transferred to Bergen Belsen concentration camp. He was died a few days before the liberation, but his daughters survived a death march. They moved first to Switzerland and later emigrated to Israel.

Goslar wrote a number of books on Jewish subjects. In 1919 he published "Die Sexualethik der juedischen Wiedergeburt" in which he urged a return to Jewish family ethics.
דה יונג, סלומון (סלו)
אבלס, אוטו
מנהיג ציוני, סופר

נולד והתחנך בברנו, מוראביה (היום בצ'כיה), שם היה ממארגני "וריטאס", ארגון סטודנטים יהודים, וממייסדי התנועה הציונית בבוהמיה ובמוראביה.

אבלס הצטרף לחוגם של הציונים ברטולד פייבל ורוברט שטריקר. כשסיים את לימודיו באוניברסיטת וינה, עבד כיועץ משפטי בחברת הרכבות האוסטרית. הוא נמשך לכתיבה ועבר לתחום העיתונאות. אבלס היה מעורכי העיתון הציוני "וולט" ו"יודישה צייטונג", כתב מאמרים לעיתון "יידישה נציונל צייטונג" ולעיתונים גרמניים נוספים. יחד עם רוברט שטריקר יסד יומון ציוני ששמו "וינר מורגנצייטונג". בשנת 1926 נתמנה לשליח קרן היסוד, והרצה ברחבי מערב אירופה. משנת 1930 כיהן כמנהל קרן היסוד באמסטרדם.

מיצירותיו החשובות: Die Genesung, שירה (1920), "ביקור בארץ ישראל, תיאור של ביקורו הראשון (1926), ו"עשר יהודיות", על נשים יהודיות נודעות.

בשנות השואה היה אבלס אסיר במחנה הריכוז ברגן בלזן. הוא נפטר מתשישות בשנת 1945, זמן קצר אחרי ששוחרר מן המחנה.
פאפ, קארוי
Pap, Karoly (1897-1945), author born in Sopron, Hungary (then part of Austria-Hungary), where his father was the rabbi of the Neolog Miksa Pollak community. Pap was an officer in the Austro-Hungarian army during World War I and was decorated for bravery. After demobilization, he joined Bela Kun's October Revolution and became a Hungarian Red Army commander. On the collapse of the revolution he was arrested, reduced to the ranks, and condemned to 18 months' imprisonment. After his release he left the country until 1925. Then he returned, settled in Budapest and began writing poetry and stories. He soon became known as a short story writer, but wishing to remain independent, he refused to take any employment.

Pap's first novel, "Megszabaditottal a halaltol" ("Thou Hast Delivered Me from Death," 1932), which dealt with a popular Jewish Messiah in the time of Jesus, was enthusiastically received by liberal and radical writers, notably the great Hungarian author, Zsigmond Moritz, who gave him much encouragement. The character of Jesus and the period in which he lived recur constantly in Pap's writings, not because of any attraction to Christianity but because, in his opinion, this "classical" period of Judaism retained traces of the Divinity, and at the same time presented social contrasts and gave Jews the taste of suffering. His great autobiographical novel "Azarel" (1937), which portrayed his father's house through the eyes of a child, aroused indignation among Jewish readers because of the cruel frankness of the description. In his sensational essay, "Zsido sebek es bunok" ("Jewish Wounds and Sins", 1935), Pap made a thorough and candid analysis of his Jewish and non-Jewish social surroundings. He traced the history of the Jews, particularly of Hungarian Jewry, in order to expose conventional lies, especially those concerning emancipation. He found only one solution to the Jewish problem: acceptance of the fate of a national minority. He himself was fanatically attached to all aspects of Jewish life and was uncompromising in his loyalty.

During World War II, The Budapest Jewish Theatre performed two biblical plays by Pap: "Bathsheba" (1940) and "Moses" (1944). In May 1944 he was sent to a labor camp. From there he refused to escape and was deported to Buchenwald, and is presumed to have been murdered in Bergen-Belsen. Three works which appeared posthumously were "A szuzesseg fatylai" ("The Vials of Chastity,"1945), "A Hoszobor" ("The Snow Statue." 1954) and "B varosaban tortent" ("It Happened in the City B," 2 vols., 1964).